Jump to content

WW II thoughts?


Lazy WP
 Share

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, mike newman said:

..love these   old aircrtaft pictures...was going to put it on the "Awesome  Picture Thread''...

...but it belongs on this thread.....

..Lancaster

Mike

1663718802839 lancaster.jpg

Cockpit might have been a very warm place on a sunny day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, mike newman said:

..love these   old aircrtaft pictures...was going to put it on the "Awesome  Picture Thread''...

...but it belongs on this thread.....

..Lancaster

Mike

1663718802839 lancaster.jpg

Mike, were you familiar with the British Fr47 Seafire fighter plane? A northwest Montana friend of mine has the only one airworthy that I'm aware of. There may be more. He invented the "flowmeter" and doesn't have to work anymore. He has a huge hangar full of old aircraft. He purchased this Seafire in a crate in storage in England. The plane has (I believe?) either a Halifax or a Lancaster bomber engine installed in a Spitfire airframe. It has counter rotating props, to keep it from flipping over when revving it on the ground. The counter rotating props give it a "mushy" sound, rather than the "crack sound" a single prop would give, as on a Spitfire. But it is powerful. It came about by being designed to chase Hitler's jets over the Channel. The war came to an end before they were ever utilized in combat. To make the airplane feel at home, he had 27(?) semi tractors and lowboys bring stones from a Texas Quarry for his private Stonehenge, near his runway and golf course.  Gary   

Fr-47 Seafire.jpg

Seafire fly over.jpg

Seafire over Stonehenge, NW Montana.jpg

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  My grandparents moved to the farm I am on today in 1923.  They being of German descent were poorly received in a community that consisted mostly of people whose families came over 150 years prior from England.  Most of my school years were during the 1970's and carrying a German surname I could say that I was not the most popular kid in school for that.  I actually had a 4th grade teacher mildly mock my background and if I thought dad would not go off of the deep end I would have said something.  If I could go back in time and talk to the Kaiser before the war I would tell him that it was not worth it for Germany to go to war.  That Germany and Germans suffered far more than he could imagine and for a far greater period of time.  

The Kaiser should of listened to to then Reichscouncler Hiddenburg he told him or warned him when the Kaiser was still in his early years on the throne do not surround ya'r self with them Officers, and sadly he did and we know what happened next. 

I heard of some stories here in my area too that they weren't treated well same goes for Swiss folks as well they where not allowed to speak german. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Swiss Fighter plane made in and developed in Switzerland starting in 1939, only 142 where made. Plane was in service from 1942 to 1952 in the Schweizerische Luftwaffe (in the Swiss Luftwaffe) 

Swiss_Air_Force_C-3603-1.thumb.jpg.31da85fb8f0c492fae9f33524d118336.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/19/2022 at 4:23 PM, sandhiller said:

I just got got one of Mike's CD's

Got it for the coyote huntin song

When I get home I will check to see if the song you are talking about is on it. 

People buy CDs?!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, U-C said:

The Kaiser should of listened to to then Reichscouncler Hiddenburg he told him or warned him when the Kaiser was still in his early years on the throne do not surround ya'r self with them Officers, and sadly he did and we know what happened next. 

I heard of some stories here in my area too that they weren't treated well same goes for Swiss folks as well they where not allowed to speak german. 

 

  Germany did need to come into the then modern world meaning it did need full time military officers.  Germany prior to the 19th Century was a bunch of nation-states that spoke a similar language with each having a small militia.  A peace time military was in the best interests in terms of the nation-states unifying into Germany.  This allowed all involved to have access to food and industrial materials to live a modern life style.  That outsiders would not be allowed to readily disrupt trade.  How much of a navy it needed is open to debate.  If it was going to trade with other European nations such as Spain and Italy then material would move via the sea and therefore a need to have a navy to protect German vessels in shipping lanes.  Did Germany really need the number of battleships it had at the opening of hostilities in 1914?  Most likely no but then we are looking at it from our perspective instead of theirs.  During the time of Teddy Roosevelt our military leaders considered Britain and not Germany the most likely opponent if a war broke out.  So it was more than just the Germans that considered the Brits a likely threat.  But what Germany lacked was a calm and intellectual leader that would not be goaded into rash decisions and would constantly sooth the English fears of a changing continental power.  Instead Kaiser Wilhelm II was arrogant, mentally erratic, and simple minded.  A man who simply was not up to the challenge of being a leader in a modern world. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has been a very informative thread. It has reminded me of my Grandpa, who told me he was of Pennsylvania Dutch descent. One day my Grandma's sister told me that before the Lusitania was sunk, Grandpa had said he was of German descent. I can understand his changing his story! We had an area in the township known as little Germany, my mother told me there was a German family living there in WW 1 that was basically shunned by the rest of the town.  

John

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, tinnerjohn said:

This has been a very informative thread. It has reminded me of my Grandpa, who told me he was of Pennsylvania Dutch descent. One day my Grandma's sister told me that before the Lusitania was sunk, Grandpa had said he was of German descent. I can understand his changing his story! We had an area in the township known as little Germany, my mother told me there was a German family living there in WW 1 that was basically shunned by the rest of the town.  

John

I, too, have heard of this.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Dasnake said:

Mu own father was working in the Navy yard and deferred. I believe that always bothered him.

 I don't know why what he did, would have bothered him.  He WAS contributing to the war effort, and what he did, enabled US to "win the war".

Nothing to be ashamed of there, and IF the shipyard had won the "E" award for their work, so much the better.

https://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/a/army-navy-e-award.html

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

People buy CDs?!

When I can't get the cassette

And don't even get me started on trying to find an 8-track☹️

  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, tinnerjohn said:

This has been a very informative thread. It has reminded me of my Grandpa, who told me he was of Pennsylvania Dutch descent. One day my Grandma's sister told me that before the Lusitania was sunk, Grandpa had said he was of German descent. I can understand his changing his story! We had an area in the township known as little Germany, my mother told me there was a German family living there in WW 1 that was basically shunned by the rest of the town.  

John

Not too far from where l live here in Texas, there was a small town named Brandenburg. But shortly after WWl started, the town's people got together and changed the name to Old Glory, Texas because of the anti-German sentiments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was a story told about an old German neighbor who once said that Hitler could land his blimp on his farm. I don't think he was too popular at the time. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My father was drafted in 1942 and given a medical discharge 6 months later. He told me numerous times of feelings of shame, even though he joined the American Legion and served in the honor guard for the burial of at least one KIA during the war, as well as other veterans. I think I can kind of understand, since I never served, fortunately being too young for Viet Nam. I hope 30 years on the VFD helped somewhat to pay my dues, but I still feel like a slacker sometimes!

The aftermath of 9-11 reminded me of the anti German and Japanese feelings that arose overnight.

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

 I don't know why what he did, would have bothered him.  He WAS contributing to the war effort, and what he did, enabled US to "win the war".

Nothing to be ashamed of there, and IF the shipyard had won the "E" award for their work, so much the better.

https://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/a/army-navy-e-award.html

 

 

Somehow newey's quote got wrapped up with my name art.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, tinnerjohn said:

My father was drafted in 1942 and given a medical discharge 6 months later. He told me numerous times of feelings of shame, even though he joined the American Legion and served in the honor guard for the burial of at least one KIA during the war, as well as other veterans. I think I can kind of understand, since I never served, fortunately being too young for Viet Nam. I hope 30 years on the VFD helped somewhat to pay my dues, but I still feel like a slacker sometimes!

The aftermath of 9-11 reminded me of the anti German and Japanese feelings that arose overnight.

John

VFD?, where would that be john? We have a VFD from vancouver bc, I was BFD until retirement 15 years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, iowaboy1965 said:

There was a story told about an old German neighbor who once said that Hitler could land his blimp on his farm. I don't think he was too popular at the time. 

  Based on what I heard around here I think some German-Americans had no concept of what was taking place over in Germany when Hitler came to power.  They assumed that it was not possible for somebody of a similar background to be such a bad human being.  That is not to make excuses for those who did understand what Hitler was and openly supported the immorality that came with him.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, 766 Man said:

  Based on what I heard around here I think some German-Americans had no concept of what was taking place over in Germany when Hitler came to power.  They assumed that it was not possible for somebody of a similar background to be such a bad human being.  That is not to make excuses for those who did understand what Hitler was and openly supported the immorality that came with him.  

Never thought of that angle but I'm sure that could be true.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, tinnerjohn said:

My father was drafted in 1942 and given a medical discharge 6 months later. He told me numerous times of feelings of shame, even though he joined the American Legion and served in the honor guard for the burial of at least one KIA during the war, as well as other veterans. I think I can kind of understand, since I never served, fortunately being too young for Viet Nam. I hope 30 years on the VFD helped somewhat to pay my dues, but I still feel like a slacker sometimes!

The aftermath of 9-11 reminded me of the anti German and Japanese feelings that arose overnight.

John

  The attitude towards German-Americans after WWI was very complicated.  For centuries England and the German nation-states viewed each other as cousins even before things such as the House of Hanover came along.  Each entity really had no respect for the other Europeans like they did for each other.  At the same time like in real family units there are the strong who want to control and there are the strong who are not in a position to control and resent the other who can control.  But in the end it is like in most families at the end of the day we put our differences aside so as to be able to function.  After WWI in communities that had high percentages of both English and Germans it was a feeling of personal betrayal felt by the English descendants towards their German cousins.  The bitterness was never there with the Italian-Americans or the few Japanese-Americans like it was with the German-Americans.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...