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WW II thoughts?


Lazy WP
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One of the auctioneers in Valentine has put out a couple of record albums and on one of them, he wrote a song about his Dad and the war. Seems like Burrell flew 35 missions in one, mainly in 44 and the spring of 45. 
Burrell was our school bus driver, my kindergarten year. But I don’t ever remember him talking about the war. Mike’s song tells about burying his buddy in the English sands.
Just a humbling reminder that I really don’t want to go to war.  

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War! What is it good for? Absolutely nothing!!!

Ya know what, every time I hear/read/listen to this query I always think of the hundreds of thousands of soldiers killed in battles who might/could have made a difference in how this ducked up world is run by the scum we have running the world, just a thought about WAY, WAY, WAY, to many wasted lives.

 

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Dad and many of his friends were WWII vets. Many stories. Apparently long stretches of boredom separated by periods of **** on earth.

Dad said we need to keep the wars 'over there'. The destruction of the country is horrible.

Korea was worse from what I've heard.

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1 minute ago, acem said:

Dad and many of his friends were WWII vets. Many stories. Apparently long stretches of boredom separated by periods of **** on earth.

Dad said we need to keep the wars 'over there'. The destruction of the country is horrible.

Korea was worse from what I've heard.

Not the only thing I took away from my old mans table talks on the war but one of HIS main points was getting up in the morning and tuned to a very fine edge and staying that way til he got back to camp and the feeling drained out of him to relax a little so he could try some sleep, the b17 thread was a good posting but I didnt want to hijack with stories but maybe lazy will open this up a bit to allow some our vet parents stories related here.

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23 minutes ago, Rawleigh99 said:

my Dad, Godfather and a few friends were all in WWII.  They either did not tell war stories or told sanitized or funny stories when asked.  Most did not really want to talk about it.

A lot of people I knew were in that boat, but Ive mentioned before my mother spent 5 years in occupied netherlands and the old man 5 years on the italian campaign so it took very little to get a table discussion going with her being a warbride, after she passed in '74 the talk was few and far between then.

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30 minutes ago, acem said:

Thousands?

The USSR lost over 20 million in WWII. China lose nearly 20 million.

we got off easy here in north America. The civilian losses were light.

Thx-Ace 

World_War_II_Casualties.svg.png

I wasnt skewing numbers just making a small point.

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35 minutes ago, Rawleigh99 said:

my Dad, Godfather and a few friends were all in WWII.  They either did not tell war stories or told sanitized or funny stories when asked.  Most did not really want to talk about it.

My mother's high school sweetheart and first love died in the war.   His brother was captured and spent 2 years in a prisoner-of-war camp before escaping and living with the natives of Borneo until well after the war.  He survived the war but was mentally wrecked, rarely leaving a cabin in the woods of his parents farm in Akron, Indiana.   The two young men were my father's first cousins.  My dad also served, but rarely spoke about the war.

I honor them each Memorial Day, and think of them often.

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They suffered silently, unlike people today.  It took a toll on many. 

My Godfather was in the Pacific and he told a story about being abandoned on Okinawa when the typhoon right after the war struck.  He had gone to shore to get the mail in his LCM and when he tried to go back to the ship he discovered it had sortied under strict orders, leaving him and his other two crewmen behind.  They returned to shore, tied up as best they could and, taking the mail sacks with them, went up in the hills to wait out the storm.  There were caves there but he could smell the Japanese cooking so he would not let the crew go into them.  They set behind rocks for three days while the typhoon just about destroyed the island.  The original story ended with the crew back on the ship being congratulated for hanging on to the mail sacks!

What he did not tell me originally was that when the sky cleared two Japanese soldiers in full battle dress came out of the cave near them.  One squatted to use the bathroom but the other one came towards their hideout.  As Coxswain of the mail boat he had a 38 Colt revolver which he pulled and shot both Japanese, killing them.  I did not find out about that until a druggie broke into his house abut 10 years before he died.  He held them at gunpoint with his 870 riot gun until I got there and called the police.  Fortunately the guy was passed out on his sofa but his girlfriend was sitting meekly in a chair at gunpoint when I came in.  He started having dreams again after that about the war and thought he was going crazy.  i had to explain PTSD to him and how subsequent trauma can bring it back to the surface.  That is when he told me about killing the Japanese.

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7 minutes ago, Rawleigh99 said:

They suffered silently, unlike people today.  It took a toll on many. 

My Godfather was in the Pacific and he told a story about being abandoned on Okinawa when the typhoon right after the war struck.  He had gone to shore to get the mail in his LCM and when he tried to go back to the ship he discovered it had sortied under strict orders, leaving him and his other two crewmen behind.  They returned to shore, tied up as best they could and, taking the mail sacks with them, went up in the hills to wait out the storm.  There were caves there but he could smell the Japanese cooking so he would not let the crew go into them.  They set behind rocks for three days while the typhoon just about destroyed the island.  The original story ended with the crew back on the ship being congratulated for hanging on to the mail sacks!

What he did not tell me originally was that when the sky cleared two Japanese soldiers in full battle dress came out of the cave near them.  One squatted to use the bathroom but the other one came towards their hideout.  As Coxswain of the mail boat he had a 38 Colt revolver which he pulled and shot both Japanese, killing them.  I did not find out about that until a druggie broke into his house abut 10 years before he died.  He held them at gunpoint with his 870 riot gun until I got there and called the police.  Fortunately the guy was passed out on his sofa but his girlfriend was sitting meekly in a chair at gunpoint when I came in.  He started having dreams again after that about the war and thought he was going crazy.  i had to explain PTSD to him and how subsequent trauma can bring it back to the surface.  That is when he told me about killing the Japanese.

Thank you.

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1 hour ago, sandhiller said:

I just got got one of Mike's CD's

Got it for the coyote huntin song

When I get home I will check to see if the song you are talking about is on it. 

I think the song is on that CD. Paper Doll? 
The Coyote song is about the area I grew up in. Knew all the people he talks about. I think Earl Bestol is the only one alive now. 

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2 hours ago, acem said:

Dad and many of his friends were WWII vets. Many stories. Apparently long stretches of boredom separated by periods of **** on earth.

Dad said we need to keep the wars 'over there'. The destruction of the country is horrible.

Korea was worse from what I've heard.

My wife’s “step-grandpa” (not sure of correct terminology) still won’t eat at a Chinese restaurant.

or own anything Asian, so long as he can help it. Heck it took them making Toyota in USA for him to get one of those. 
he said, briefly and quietly once, and only once I can remember, that the heathens don’t value life. Women children screens, etc. he said that was hardest part

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Dad and his friends talked alot about it war. Most were in the pacific.

Dad was a coxswain and piloted small landing craft. Like the ones in saving private Ryan. He dropped marines off on the beaches. His primary battles were the invasion of the Philippines and Okinawa. He said Okinawa looked like the surface of the moon after the naval bombardment and air bombing. He didn't see how anyone could have survived. He spent most of his time making smoke screens by running a smoke machine in his landing craft. They were trying to protect the ships from aerial bombardment and the dreaded kamikaze. He signed up for the duration of the war like everybody else but volunteered for an extra 6 months to help take surrender of the Japanese forces in China. He said the Japs did terrible things to the Chinese people.  He hated the Japs but loved China. Never had a good thing to say about the Japs.

His friend Kenneth Sagely was asleep in a ship at Pearl when the Japs attacked. He woke up to the sound of explosions. Thinking there was a problem with his ship he headed topside in the confusion. He quickly realized they were under attack and headed to his battle station.he served throughout the war in the pacific.

His friend Don Abbott lied about his age so he could join the marines underage. His first battle was Guadalcanal. As part of a machine gun crew he carried a plate to place under the tripod. The plate would keep the tripod from digging into the sand on the beach. One time their landing craft hit an uncharted reef and they didn't make it to the beach. He sank and had to run on the bottom to get to water shallow enough for his head to get out of the water! He had many good stories about the south pacific. He loved it there. Dad and he were in some of the same battles and may have seen each other during the war.

Another friend who's name I forgot was captured in the Philippines early in the war. The Japs treated them terribly bad. He said they never got good food. They would get soup made from spoiled food and sometimes soybeans but mostly water. He would stare off in the distance as he told the story and end with "if I could just get one soybean in my soup I felt better that day". It was very powerful. He hated the japs with a passion.

Sonny Smith was in the war. I don't know anything about were he served. He was nuts, shell shocked. He was a good tractor driver though.

A friend was from Germany. Her father served in the German army during the war. When he came to visit her,  I asked him about the war. He said it was bad. Not enough supplies. His friends died. He did what he had to in order to survive. He moved his family after the war from east to west Germany during the 50s to get away from communism.

Dad served in the Korean War. Nobody ever had good stories about the early days of the Korean War. He said so many kept coming at them that they melted machine gun barrels trying to kill them all. Units lost so many men that they were folded together with other units to make whole units again. They were later transferred to Hokkaido Japan to prepare for the expected soviet invasion of Japan. 

Thx-Ace 

I've seen dad confront men stealing stuff from our farm. He would grab them by the shirt and put a gun to their head. He'd usually say either 'I've killed better men than you' or 'you won't be the first man I've killed and might not be the last'. One time he stopped Virgil Gean (a known thief) in the road. I was standing beside dad and Virgils youngest son was riding with him. Dad chewed Virgil's a$$ out throughly and told him that if he saw him on our place again he would kill him. Then he looked at Virgil's son and told him that if his dad was killed to tell the sherif that I (dad) killed him.

 

Thx-Ace 

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Ive mentioned before the old man drove a bren carrier and aided in movement of the dead and wounded, fullfilment of this job as a job was his job, but the stories he mentioned there was a couple that really ensconsed the demeanor of his job, after one battle he came across a wounded soldier who had stepped on a land mine and blown his foot apart, he started dressing the foot and noticed

the young guy was sobbing and as this wasnt something strange he noticed the man was sobbing for his mother, asking for her, the old man bandaged him up and took him into triage.

Another time him and his sargeant who was i/c came back from a run and the unit commander summoned them to the HQ hut, why? He wanted to know which way they came in, they showed him the route on the map and he says great, we don't have to check for mines there.

Another time him and sarge (his name was charlie smith) were sitting parked and all of a sudden pappy throws it into gear and backs up way and helll away from where they were, sarge says what the helll frank whats.............. just then an 88 came down and blasted a hole where they were, he had a sixth sense about the bombing placements which saved their butts a few times.

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Dasnake said:

A lot of people I knew were in that boat, but Ive mentioned before my mother spent 5 years in occupied netherlands and the old man 5 years on the italian campaign so it took very little to get a table discussion going with her being a warbride, after she passed in '74 the talk was few and far between then.

It seemed I read once Holland had one of the highest deaths per capita. 

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Unfortunately those who are defeated don't want to be interviewed about their war experience's. It's to late now, but I wish there more first hand accounts from German and Japanese veterans.

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Dad was drafted in late December 1941, he was 33.  He went through basic training in Montana, then to California.  Departed San Francisco in  early February 1942 for Australia.    He was in a transportation unit that hauled bombs and gas for the 5th Air Force.  He was in Port Moresby, New Guinea in 1942 when the Japanese were bombing it every day.  Said his unit was on one side of the airstrip (20 Mile airdrome) and the ammo/fuel dump on the other.  The Japanese regularly missed the ammo/fuel dump and hit their camp.   Later he went to the Philippines and Okinawa.    He was on Okinawa getting ready for the invasion of Japan when the war ended.  He came home in October 1945.

My Mom has some friends in Iowa National Guard the who were called up in early 1941 to fill out a Tank Battalion that was sent to the Philippines.  They were captured when the Philippines fell.  They died on one of the **** Ships that was torpedoed in 1944 by US submarines.  Mom said she was told one of them weighed less than a hundred pounds when he died.  She said he was a big man when she last saw him.

Bill

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14 hours ago, acem said:

Dad and his friends talked alot about it war. Most were in the pacific.

Dad was a coxswain and piloted small landing craft. Like the ones in saving private Ryan. He dropped marines off on the beaches. His primary battles were the invasion of the Philippines and Okinawa. He said Okinawa looked like the surface of the moon after the naval bombardment and air bombing. He didn't see how anyone could have survived. He spent most of his time making smoke screens by running a smoke machine in his landing craft. They were trying to protect the ships from aerial bombardment and the dreaded kamikaze. He signed up for the duration of the war like everybody else but volunteered for an extra 6 months to help take surrender of the Japanese forces in China. He said the Japs did terrible things to the Chinese people.  He hated the Japs but loved China. Never had a good thing to say about the Japs.

His friend Kenneth Sagely was asleep in a ship at Pearl when the Japs attacked. He woke up to the sound of explosions. Thinking there was a problem with his ship he headed topside in the confusion. He quickly realized they were under attack and headed to his battle station.he served throughout the war in the pacific.

His friend Don Abbott lied about his age so he could join the marines underage. His first battle was Guadalcanal. As part of a machine gun crew he carried a plate to place under the tripod. The plate would keep the tripod from digging into the sand on the beach. One time their landing craft hit an uncharted reef and they didn't make it to the beach. He sank and had to run on the bottom to get to water shallow enough for his head to get out of the water! He had many good stories about the south pacific. He loved it there. Dad and he were in some of the same battles and may have seen each other during the war.

Another friend who's name I forgot was captured in the Philippines early in the war. The Japs treated them terribly bad. He said they never got good food. They would get soup made from spoiled food and sometimes soybeans but mostly water. He would stare off in the distance as he told the story and end with "if I could just get one soybean in my soup I felt better that day". It was very powerful. He hated the japs with a passion.

Sonny Smith was in the war. I don't know anything about were he served. He was nuts, shell shocked. He was a good tractor driver though.

A friend was from Germany. Her father served in the German army during the war. When he came to visit her,  I asked him about the war. He said it was bad. Not enough supplies. His friends died. He did what he had to in order to survive. He moved his family after the war from east to west Germany during the 50s to get away from communism.

Dad served in the Korean War. Nobody ever had good stories about the early days of the Korean War. He said so many kept coming at them that they melted machine gun barrels trying to kill them all. Units lost so many men that they were folded together with other units to make whole units again. They were later transferred to Hokkaido Japan to prepare for the expected soviet invasion of Japan. 

Thx-Ace 

I've seen dad confront men stealing stuff from our farm. He would grab them by the shirt and put a gun to their head. He'd usually say either 'I've killed better men than you' or 'you won't be the first man I've killed and might not be the last'. One time he stopped Virgil Gean (a known thief) in the road. I was standing beside dad and Virgils youngest son was riding with him. Dad chewed Virgil's a$$ out throughly and told him that if he saw him on our place again he would kill him. Then he looked at Virgil's son and told him that if his dad was killed to tell the sherif that I (dad) killed him.

 

Thx-Ace 

  My paternal grandmother's one sister got trapped in the east as Germany fell.  Rough for quite a number of years but harder to tell as the mail from there became increasingly censored as the communists took control.  Most of the family got out of there by the 1920's as it was obvious the political situation was becoming increasingly unstable.  A fair number went to Canada and stayed there. 

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40 minutes ago, barkerwc4362 said:

My Mom has some friends in Iowa National Guard the who were called up in early 1941 to fill out a Tank Battalion that was sent to the Philippines. 

The National Guard gets derided as "weekend warriors", yet they bore the brunt, just the same as those in the regular military did.

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2 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

The National Guard gets derided as "weekend warriors", yet they bore the brunt, just the same as those in the regular military did.

And because the Guard units usually have their numbers concentrated in a community, when they are deployed into combat the number of casualties can really devastate the community.  I recall the 138th Artillery Unit from Bardstown taking a significant hit after the 1968 Tet Offensive.  That resulted in Bardstown having the  highest per capita casualty rate of any community in the US.  I imagine the circumstances for units deployed in WWII would be similar.  I know they were part of many campaigns and assault landings.  One unit, the African-American 39th Infantry Regiment from the streets of Harlem was referred to as the "**** Fighters" and earned significant recognition from the French Army to which they were assigned.

I noticed 39th Infantry Regiment nickname was tagged for profanity.  Think of the opposite of "Heaven"'.

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And, the African-American units in the then segregated army, like the Japanese-American Nissai (sp) went through all kinds of special h3ll to prove their worth.

And they, the Japanese units, did it, despite having themselves, their parents, siblings, relatives, and friends and neighbors having their property seized, and being forced into CONCENTRATION, not 'relocation' camps, in some of the most desolate and inhospitable areas of the western US.

NEVER FORGET!  I do NOT think that this can ever be forgiven, yet the revisionist historians, almost NEVER make mention of this.

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52 minutes ago, Art From Coleman said:

And, the African-American units in the then segregated army, like the Japanese-American Nissai (sp) went through all kinds of special h3ll to prove their worth.

And they, the Japanese units, did it, despite having themselves, their parents, siblings, relatives, and friends and neighbors having their property seized, and being forced into CONCENTRATION, not 'relocation' camps, in some of the most desolate and inhospitable areas of the western US.

NEVER FORGET!  I do NOT think that this can ever be forgiven, yet the revisionist historians, almost NEVER make mention of this.

,,,a similiar situation in NZ..except it was an ''internment' camp for various foreign Nationals...who were percieved to have possibly  posed a threat  to the host country....

On another topic, I mentioned a (my ) visit to an RAF Squadron reunion in the UK....Some of the personnel from 684 and 681  RAF Squadron's were involved with the repatriation of Allied prisoners.... from the infamous Japanese prison camps....

..one of the old 684 Officer's told me of an  high ranking  American Officer...who was there with his contingent of men to organise specific Prisoners back to the US...by then the 684 and 681  personnel were ''accustomed ''  (for want of a better word...)...to the sight and plight of these poor ,thin wretches..that once were strong, vibrant young men of various Allied  nationalities......

He said this American  stood ..transfixed , looking at these 'men'....and ths old gentleman described, as he remembered, the American Officer's reaction........white faced   fury ...but ''controlled  unspoken  rage'' at the perpetrators  at this inhumane  treatment....

,,,I guess it is hard to describe in a few written words..but the memories of those last few days  there in Saigon, brought tears to the old blokes eyes ..as he recounted those incidents ,,,and left an indelible impression on me..

Picture of Dad taking part in the Japanese surrender  in Saigon......

(We have the Sword at home.......)

Mike

image0-20.jpg

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2 hours ago, bob_carr said:

And because the Guard units usually have their numbers concentrated in a community, when they are deployed into combat the number of casualties can really devastate the community.  I recall the 138th Artillery Unit from Bardstown taking a significant hit after the 1968 Tet Offensive.  That resulted in Bardstown having the  highest per capita casualty rate of any community in the US.  I imagine the circumstances for units deployed in WWII would be similar.  I know they were part of many campaigns and assault landings.  One unit, the African-American 39th Infantry Regiment from the streets of Harlem was referred to as the "**** Fighters" and earned significant recognition from the French Army to which they were assigned.

I noticed 39th Infantry Regiment nickname was tagged for profanity.  Think of the opposite of "Heaven"'.

Look up the Bedford Boys from Virginia.  There is a large memorial to them in Bedford, VA.  Company A of the 116th Guard Regiment had a 90% casualty rate on Omaha Beach at Normandy.  Only 18 out of 230 not wounded or killed.  35 were from the Town of Bedford, and of those 24 were killed.  They suffered the greatest proportion of losses of any town in the United States according to what I read.

https://citizen-soldiermagazine.com/the-bedford-boys/

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