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Anybody picking (with a picker) corn this fall?


766 Man

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On 9/18/2022 at 6:53 PM, Sledgehammer said:

From the rear through the back glass. I watched. 

is that what IH anticipated? I thought the two piece doors were designed for that purpose

23 hours ago, sandhiller said:

I think in the those days that was a pretty common hazard.

I remember a few farmers that lost hands that way. 

I was young enough when family was still farming in eastern Nebraska to never have run one or been closer than a safe distance away watching. 

 

I know a guy who lost an arm on a pto driven dump trailer. one has a mangled arm from a corn picker and another guy crushed under the corn header of a Uni. maybe I am heartless but you get what you get if you don't acknowledge the dangers of equipment   I have a NI picker sheller and a NI picker. Haven't used them for a longtime but maybe when I retire I will see if the Amish will hire me to pick some corn. Its great feed ! the added fiber is what is the bonus. In my opinion the labor and handling is what made guys around here go away from it. Seems to me before my time the elevators used to have shellers and they would receive cobbed corn. anyone verify that?

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On 9/18/2022 at 9:38 PM, Sledgehammer said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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That's as close to a twin to our picking equipment as I've ever seen, right down to the wagon! I like the fresh repaint on the picker,  looks brand new. Our picker was a 2M-E, with some 2M-H options, like the solid steel fenders for the rear wheels/tires, and the non-steerable center snoot that raised with the picker, borrowed from the same 2M-H picker on a dealer's back lot. Had the M&W Super Snoot too, I think Dad painted the wagon elevator white to look more like a 2M-H. Our BIG wagon was very similar to your's too, EWC #150 box and EWC 8 ton gear painted Oliver green, but we had some other brand hoist, had 2 cylinders that straddled the center reach, think 4" cylinders,  the wagon box sat right down on the frt & rear bolsters of the running gear and two 1x12's for sideboards, the live pump on the SH really struggled to lift a full load of ear corn, could pick most of the morning into that wagon. Neighbor had a twin to it except on a Deere gear, forget the model, when He saw our EWC/Oliver branded gear he regretted buying his shade of green.

   The 80 acres my Sister & I own Dad and the neighbor farmed for 20 years, half mile rows, they rigged their picker tractors to dump the wagons, picked a round, maybe it was 2 rounds and unloaded, no waiting for an empty wagon, normally took just over a day to pick all 80 acres. They even had two cribs and elevators, no waiting to unload.

Picking on the home farm was a little slower. GRANDPA actually bought the 2M-E picker to go on Dad's new '51 M and they traded help, Dad picked, Grandpa hauled in. We only had 80 or 100 acres of corn, can't remember how much corn Grandpa had, the shared picking agreement stopped in 1964 when Grandpa rented his farm to a neighbor, Not Dad. Farming that added 160 acres is why Dad bought me the JD R diesel. AND the reason why the R left the farm so fast. My Mom inherited 40 of the160 acres, and bought another 40 from her sister, I'd buy the remaining acres but my 3 cousins will own that eventually.

   It was tough hauling in some places when picking, our buildings were in the far NE corner of the farm, the "back 40" was over a half mile away. The two wagons we picked in were different sizes, the BIG EWC, then an Economy brand flare box that held around 80-90 bushel, not 150+ like the EWC. Dad would be waiting for me every time he picked into the little wagon, because I had the BIG wagon to unload.

   I enjoyed picking, and the fall fieldwork that followed. We'd chop stalks, maybe do some fall plowing. The last year Dad farmed I had EVERYTHING fall plowed except for about 3-4 acres of old hog pasture, still had a dozen hog houses on the ground, and I was out of room to store them.

 

 

 

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The picture of the SMT-A with the 2MHD brought back a lot of memories.  We picked a lot of ear corn to feed the dairy cows and fat cattle.  In the early 60's Dad broke an axle on the SMT-A while picking.  I remember the tractor and picker in the field across the highway from the house.  I believe they swapped the axle in the field.  Neither I or Dad ever left the seat with the picker running.  Too many things that can grab you.

Bill

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23 minutes ago, barkerwc4362 said:

 Neither I or Dad ever left the seat with the picker running.  Too many things that can grab you.

Wise plan! The first time you fire up one of those things ,even WITH all the guards in place, is a little intimidating!

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guy that retails my shell corn, also picks about 15 acres of ear corn for sale to people that want ear corn. He uses a 2 row NI 325 picker.

When I milked cows, I made a lot of high moisture ground ear corn.  Started harvesting with 2 row snapperhead on 892 chopper, kept in 14x30 upright silo. Progressed to a NI 325 picker-grinder, made the best feed of any machine I have used. Then bought a 802 Uni/ chopper and 3 row head and filled 150' ag bags, finally progressed to neighbor's NH 2115 self propelled chopper with my IH 1063 combine head. 

I always figured I could substitute 1# of HMEC for 1# of shell corn, and the cows never missed a beat. Plus I got an extra ton of roughage every acre.

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2 years ago, I had some picking corn that didn't dry down, picked it in the spring with an Allis Chalmers 1 row, just to see if it would pick corn. 1/2 mph it would- faster and it would plug. Finished the 2 acres with a NI 1 row.

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On 9/19/2022 at 2:01 PM, MTB98 said:

Do you store it in piles like that? Tarp it? Or move it to ear corn cribs?

We just leave it in piles- storage is generally not a concern. It's always fed up before spring thaw.

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On 9/18/2022 at 5:46 PM, Rick G. said:

Ummmmmmmmmmmmmmm…….How praytell do you get in and out of that ICB cab on that rig?????

Those cabs had Dutch doors. You can see the split in the door in the video still.

Mike

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Art, my Dad had a hammermill when I was growing up. Think it was a Monkey-Wards. It ground the shucks just fine We ground a load of feed with that stupid thing every Saturday, where most of my hearing loss came from. Who knew to wear earplugs or muffs!

Just a guess, but if you close the concave it will 'grind' the cobs. I would think it would crack the kernels too if you get it too tight.

 

 


 

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2 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

How does a hammermill (which is assume is the grinding mechanism if almost all grinder mixers) handle the shucks on ear corn.

I understand that the kernels and cobs will pass through the screen, but I would think that the shucks would just wind up in a ball.

I believe that my Dad went to a LETZ burr mill, because it would shred the shucks, and produce feed from ear and shelled corn, without turning it into powder/dust (which was the purpose of the dust collector on a hammermill)  It seems that cattle would nose through the ground feed, without eating the fine, flour like powder, which wound up in the corners of the bunks.

I wonder how a roller mill would handle the shucks on ear corn, after looking, it seems that ArtsWay grinder mixers use a roller mill, and I do not know if Kneedler is still in business or, if so, they still make roller mills of any size.

We filled a silo with ear corn. We put a Farmall 230 on the blower ran the unloading auger from a 1150 mill into it, covered it with canvas. 766 on mill with a 1 1/4 screen in it. put a gravity wagon feeding the mill. Elevator to gravity wagon and filled it with the wagons cycling to the 702 Uni two row and the two row 324 picker. One person just stood by the mill feeding it with earplugs in. Filled a 14x 45 that way for years. Feed quality was if you used less than a 1 1/4 screen it pulverized anything including sticks and handles that were unplugging the bridging, never had a problem with stalks or the husks. One year the mill broke and rented a roller mill which was quicker but my Dad flipped his lid when he saw the bill for the rent.

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Shucks normally wouldn't bother a hammermill because the swinging hammers would just push the product through the screen.  The smaller the holes in the screen the finer the product that was ground. 

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18 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

wonder how a roller mill would handle the shucks on ear corn, after looking, it seems that ArtsWay grinder mixers use a roller mill, and I do not know if Kneedler is still in business or, if so, they still make roller mills of any size.

Artsway probably made both hammer and roller mills. The great majority in my area were hammer mills. Right now I have 2 artsway hammer mills. As others have said the shucks never seemed to be a problem for hammer mills tho the goal was always to have as few shucks in a load of ear corn as possible. 

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59 minutes ago, Art From Coleman said:

This is true, but Allis Chalmers pickers (Model #33), few as they were NEVER seemed to master that concept, and, on wire cribs, you could tell if it had been a windy day when they were filled, by the side of the crib being lined with shucks.

the 33 was a 2 row mounted picker. My pull behind Allis picker is half of a #33. The only thing on mine that might pass as husking area is the snapping rolls are extended well beyond where the ear snaps off/ rolls are knobby in that area. Yes, it does a crap job of husking. Tho, some of my problem was likely the corn variety.

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20 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

And, at one time John Deere was touting the ability of their combines to make a kernel/cob mix, but I do not know how this was done.

I have tried to get our Deere conventional combines to grind up the corn and could never get them to do it. We always still end up running it through the hammermill before we bag the high moisture corn. We do take the sieve out to try and get cobs in it. 

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The last 6 years or so I have been planting 10ac of wide row (38in) corn to "play" in. I have pickers, and some friends have them so we get together about the last weekend of October and have a "Picker Days" weekend. 

We put the ear corn into the wore crib with an IH #21 elevator, then winter thru early summer we grind it for fat cattle feed.

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1 hour ago, Dan Robinson said:

The last 6 years or so I have been planting 10ac of wide row (38in) corn to "play" in. I have pickers, and some friends have them so we get together about the last weekend of October and have a "Picker Days" weekend. 

We put the ear corn into the wore crib with an IH #21 elevator, then winter thru early summer we grind it for fat cattle feed.

Very cool, thanks for the pics

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On 9/21/2022 at 12:22 PM, Art From Coleman said:

 

And, at one time John Deere was touting the ability of their combines to make a kernel/cob mix, but I do not know how this was done.

 

Art, when IH brought out the Axial-Flow combine in the late 1970s/early 1980s, one thing that IH pushed about them was their ability to "field grind" ear corn. There were several service bulletins written on suggestions for combine setup to do this. Generally speaking, you set up the combine like you would for wheat.....small wire concaves, run the concaves tight to the rotor, run the rotor fast like you would for wheat. After the concaves, they wanted you to remove the grates, so that all of the grain, stover, and fodder fell into the cleaning system area....where they wanted you to remove the sieves so that EVERYTHING ended up in the grain tank.

I've seen and heard mixed results doing this. A CaseIH dealer a couple hours east of me had several guys do this over the course of several years. Supposedly, it could be tough on rotors and concaves doing this. And then you might have a problem getting that stuff out of the grain tank, especially if its high-moisture corn.

I do have a customer here that has tried something similar with a couple 8240s for several years. He removes the sieves, but does leave all of his concaves/grates in the machine so not so much stover and fodder ends up in the grain tank. He combines this stuff very wet(30-35% moisture), and packs it into a silage pile with his silage. He must do okay with it....he keeps doing it year after year. 

I don't remember which one, but one of the Farmington Implement IH DVDs shows an 03 series IH combine setup for grinding corn in the field with a combine. It shows the sample in the grain tank....would probably make good cow chow.

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On 9/21/2022 at 1:22 PM, Art From Coleman said:

As far as I know, IH was the only manufacturer that offered a grinder attachment on their Model 234 picker.

And, at one time John Deere was touting the ability of their combines to make a kernel/cob mix, but I do not know how this was done.

A quick search using Google-fu only mentions that cobs in the tank is a bad thing.

back when JD was making conventionals it was clear as day to look in a trailer and see if it was a JD load . worst sample on the market IMHO lots of cob💩

 New Idea offered a hammer mill attachment for their pickers. I know of one close by and was always going to buy it but never got around to it

 

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11 hours ago, Dan Robinson said:

The last 6 years or so I have been planting 10ac of wide row (38in) corn to "play" in. I have pickers, and some friends have them so we get together about the last weekend of October and have a "Picker Days" weekend. 

We put the ear corn into the wore crib with an IH #21 elevator, then winter thru early summer we grind it for fat cattle feed.

 

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Dan that pic is fantastic. it could be taken from an IH brochure from the 60s

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1 hour ago, hillman said:

back when JD was making conventionals it was clear as day to look in a trailer and see if it was a JD load . worst sample on the market IMHO lots of cob💩

 New Idea offered a hammer mill attachment for their pickers. I know of one close by and was always going to buy it but never got around to it

 

  Funny, I run a JD 6620 combine and I always made the grumpy elevator manager happy when I brought loads in.  Don't matter if you run a JD, IH, Gleaner, etc you have to check adjustments and every field is different in terms of conditions.  

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2 hours ago, hillman said:

 New Idea offered a hammer mill attachment for their pickers. I know of one close by and was always going to buy it but never got around to it

 

that is what I still have in the shed next door. There is a set of crushing rolls, under the knives and screen, so the corn and cobs are sized well. Beautiful feed.

The spout is made so it can swivel and follow the wagon on turns. 2 springs about 30-36" long, one spring hooks into each topside of the unloading wagon. Except for when you forget to unhook said springs when changing wagons. Then they are about 6 or 8' long. I bought more springs for that thing....... Finally locked it like in the video.

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3 hours ago, hillman said:

 New Idea offered a hammer mill attachment for their pickers. I know of one close by and was always going to buy it but never got around to it

 

sorry for the double post..

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While we're also on the subject of grinders. 

I also have a 234 Grinder unit. I bought it out of western IA, they used it to grind high moisture corn then blew it into a silo for feed. 

The grinder unit is similar to a sheller, but has cast iron burr ring that grinds the cobs at the end of the rotor. The shelled corn is augered into a roller mill to crack the corn. Then the ground cobs and cracked corn are mixed while being augered into the wagon

The 234 grinder unit can also be converted into a sheller/cracker, which will shell the corn and then run it thru the roller mill to crack it. Yet dump the cobs on the ground.

Or also it can be used as a standard sheller. And use it like a regular sheller unit. 

A true Multiple Purpose Grinder-Sheller.

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