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Variable valve duration cam shaft.


Mudfly
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https://youtu.be/uhsgdwUX1-w

This is interesting.  I don’t know how much this gains vs just being expensive, but nevertheless it’s really interesting since the mechanism is all mechanical.

I would think that electronic actuated valves are going to be coming soon and will be cheaper in the long run if this is where ICE engines are going.  Otherwise, there is still nothing wrong with a well profiled cam, pushrods, and lifters.

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The Chevy 5.3 I am working on now is a vvt, dod engine. Here are some of the pictures of parts that make it happen. Tim g set with vvt gear setup, the actuator bolt that would have a switch on cover, the lifters and valley cover for dod engines and the oil pump that wears out causing troubles. The biggest thing with any of those motors is to change oil regularly. Dirty oil will stick lots of parts. The guys that know engines say if you disable dod on a Chevy the vvt still gives you power and torque on old motors.

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VVT is slightly different.  That changes the phase of when a valve opens/closes to the position of the crankshaft.  The Variable valve duration, actually will add or subtract degrees that the valve is open.  
For the sake of arguement, let’s say that a cam has 75 degrees of valve opening, vvt shifts when the 75 degrees starts and stops, but it will always be 75 degrees of duration.  This new technology would allow that 75 degrees to vary from 60 degrees to 90 degrees (just saying, not sure if those are the actual numbers or not).

Neat idea.  Not sure what it buys though in the real world.

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12 minutes ago, Mudfly said:

Neat idea.  Not sure what it buys though in the real world.

Both variable valve timing and variable duration would broaden the torque curve.   Question is if the gains are worth the added complexity. All the efforts to broaden the torque curve run rather contrary to the trend of more transmission speed ratios and infinitely variable transmissions designed to utilize an engine with a narrower performance band. 

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2 hours ago, Gearclash said:

Both variable valve timing and variable duration would broaden the torque curve.   Question is if the gains are worth the added complexity. All the efforts to broaden the torque curve run rather contrary to the trend of more transmission speed ratios and infinitely variable transmissions designed to utilize an engine with a narrower performance band. 

Long live the 18 speed RoadRanger!!

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14 hours ago, Rawleigh99 said:

Those phasors die regularly.  A friend bought a used Chevy Colorado and had to delete them.  It made a nice truck after that.  Had to have a new cam and other parts for the delete.

If you keep oil changed (3000 miles ) and run a dexos oil. They don’t give much trouble. We had a lifter hang up on this suburban at 150,000 miles I drove it home and stopped at Chevy dealer. When I restarted it it straightened out and has been good.

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23 hours ago, oleman said:

Just something else to break, and more initial cost to the consumer, with very little gain.

 

Modern engineers should learn this. I am so aggravated at these “improvements” that generate little more than hours and hours of diagnostic time, piles of used parts and huge repair bills. I hope the military doesn’t use all of this “modern” garbage or we are in trouble.  Just from our own on farm experience, which means nothing on an Internet forum, Diesel engine reliability peaked in the mid to late 90’s. 

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I am so backward that I think aluminum engine blocks are just in there for extra profits to the manufacture  over the live of the vehicle unless the vehicle has wings and flies!! It will all be over after the greenies get done killing the petro industry. Wonder where they intend to get their plastic for insulation on all their electric gizmos?

 

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28 minutes ago, oleman said:

I am so backward that I think aluminum engine blocks are just in there for extra profits to the manufacture  over the live of the vehicle unless the vehicle has wings and flies!! It will all be over after the greenies get done killing the petro industry. Wonder where they intend to get their plastic for insulation on all their electric gizmos?

 

If it is unreliable, impossible to diagnose problems with it, and costs a fortune to replace, you can bet they want to make it standard equipment. 

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2 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

Diesel engine reliability peaked in the mid to late 90’s. 

Tier 3 is when it started going down hill.  Tier 1 and 2 I think have us all useful improvement.  After that it was only about improving air quality in LA or other such human ant hills. The rest of us get to foot the bill on it. 

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15 hours ago, oleman said:

I am so backward that I think aluminum engine blocks are just in there for extra profits to the manufacture  over the live of the vehicle unless the vehicle has wings and flies!! It will all be over after the greenies get done killing the petro industry. Wonder where they intend to get their plastic for insulation on all their electric gizmos?

 

Seems like another couple of aluminium producers in Europe shutting down production due to electricity costs

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13 hours ago, Gearclash said:

Tier 3 is when it started going down hill.  Tier 1 and 2 I think have us all useful improvement.  After that it was only about improving air quality in LA or other such human ant hills. The rest of us get to foot the bill on it. 

Someone here a while ago gave a table of costs and environmental improvement of the various Tiers

IIRC Tier 0 to Tier 1 was a 90% reduction in emissions

Tier 1 to Tier 2 was also a 90% reduction - but of the 10% that was left.  So we're now at 99% reduction. And any reductions from there were also of what was then left

And if you graphed the costs and the reductions the best bang for the buck was between Tier 2 and Tier 3

But the zealots got their way

http://www.numberwatch.co.uk/zealots.htm

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1 hour ago, Ian Beale said:

Seems like another couple of aluminium producers in Europe shutting down production due to electricity costs

My colleague and friend who grew up in Jamaica explained to me that the ore they mined was processed to alumina then shipped off to places with cheap electricity such as Iceland that has lots of hydro power for processing to aluminum. His dad was an officer in the company. I've driven by some of the plants in Iceland - very large and long buildings.

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2 hours ago, New Englander said:

My colleague and friend who grew up in Jamaica explained to me that the ore they mined was processed to alumina then shipped off to places with cheap electricity such as Iceland that has lots of hydro power for processing to aluminum. His dad was an officer in the company. I've driven by some of the plants in Iceland - very large and long buildings.

Producing aluminum from ore requires immense amounts of electricity -- such that one wag said aluminum is essentially a solid form of electricity.  

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4 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

Someone here a while ago gave a table of costs and environmental improvement of the various Tiers

IIRC Tier 0 to Tier 1 was a 90% reduction in emissions

Tier 1 to Tier 2 was also a 90% reduction - but of the 10% that was left.  So we're now at 99% reduction. And any reductions from there were also of what was then left

And if you graphed the costs and the reductions the best bang for the buck was between Tier 2 and Tier 3

But the zealots got their way

http://www.numberwatch.co.uk/zealots.htm

There are too many things left out of the equation when using real world experience. We have engines from the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s that still have almost all of the original parts. Even though they have over 10,000 hours on them and they have never needed a service call.  We have newer engines that constantly have small, nuisance type issues. This often requires special trips to the dealer, or the dealer service tech to come out just to diagnose it with another trip to get parts. I wish someone who was honest and had no agenda would figure all of these real world costs over the expected life compared to predecessors. Are you really decreasing emissions by making all these extra trips? Does it really save anything when products no longer last? I think too often the rationale is that oil is evil, so it doesn’t matter what it costs and if you go broke in the process, who cares?

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I am the opposite thinking at least for vehicle engines. I have at least 7 or 8 running vehicles with most all over 100,000miles. My daily driver is a 13 Chevy with 250,000. The motors and transmissions from my 94 Chevy on up until now have been very. Durable with almost no maintenance. Oil changes and spark plugs is all I have ever done. The 10 suburban with the oil leak at 180,000 is the most work I have done to one.

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2 minutes ago, dale560 said:

I am the opposite thinking at least for vehicle engines. I have at least 7 or 8 running vehicles with most all over 100,000miles. My daily driver is a 13 Chevy with 250,000. The motors and transmissions from my 94 Chevy on up until now have been very. Durable with almost no maintenance. Oil changes and spark plugs is all I have ever done. The 10 suburban with the oil leak at 180,000 is the most work I have done to one.

I don't disagree with you.  Its possible that gas vs diesel.  Lets face it gas engines from the late 70's, 80's and early 90's weren't known for being the best, but they were constantly improving and while some engines still have issues, lets face it 150,000 miles is normal without doing much to an engine. 

I suspect diesel engines from lets say about 2000 to 2015 have suffered issues for various reasons (increasing HP, emissions controls, changes to fuel, overseas manufacturing, etc).  And lets face it, you can't diagnose and fix/tune an engine with 2 wrenches and a screwdriver anymore.  

Hopefully the growing pains are close to over and we can get back to high quality, long lasting engines.

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Mudfly said:

I don't disagree with you.  Its possible that gas vs diesel.  Lets face it gas engines from the late 70's, 80's and early 90's weren't known for being the best, but they were constantly improving and while some engines still have issues, lets face it 150,000 miles is normal without doing much to an engine. 

I suspect diesel engines from lets say about 2000 to 2015 have suffered issues for various reasons (increasing HP, emissions controls, changes to fuel, overseas manufacturing, etc).  And lets face it, you can't diagnose and fix/tune an engine with 2 wrenches and a screwdriver anymore.  

Hopefully the growing pains are close to over and we can get back to high quality, long lasting engines.

 

 

 

The 2006 era twin turbo or egr engines were a handful. It was a rush to get product to met epa emissions and more testing would have solved a lot of issues. A 6.4 or 6.0 power stroke comes to mind with the aftermarket products you can have a very durable long lasting engine. From the factory they were a warranty nightmare.

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11 minutes ago, int 504 said:

My father bought a 47 Chevy new and sold it with 150,000 miles on it when he bought a new 54 Chevy which was also sold with 150, 000 miles neither one had any major work done, just oil changes, tune ups. These were 6 cyl one standard, one automatic.

Boy a 150,000 on dipper rods would be a stretch. I think by 54 they had full pressure oil system but still bypass filter. Dad had a 47 Chevy truck his dad bought new . They put a new updated engine in it in 1963 or 4 with not a lot of miles.

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