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1980 ford F600, IH motor?


stronger800
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Got a neighbor looking at a small dump truck with only 36k on it. Seller says it has a 6.6.  165hp IH turbocharged motor in it.  Believes  it to be original. What motor would that be?  He says at a glance it doesn’t look like  the 414/36/66 tractor motors we are more familiar with.  But he isn’t a mechanic, and only looked at it briefly in the dark.    Uncle had a F600 with a big gas motor in it back in the day.  390?  But way bigger than the pickup style motors. Thanks.  
Pump is on the right, turbo on the left.

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Alot if the 70s big trucks had 352, 361, 391 v-8s, I think there was also a 332, or something like that, the later 80s gassers, were 460s ,Ford changed the casting on those later blocks to be used for truck purposes.  Those are cast with longer cylinder walls, which if you are interested in stroking one, which I plan to do in the near future, that's the block you really do best to find 

My f600 has the 352, and it has torque, but loaded, it needs a mile or two to hit 55 😂

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From Wiki 

Doesn't look like there was a inline 6 diesel until 1985 when the New Holland engine was introduced 

 

Sixth generation (1980-1999)[edit]

For the 1980 model year, the medium-duty F-Series underwent its first complete redesign since 1967. As with its predecessor, the cab and interior were derived from the F-Series pickup trucks of the period, with medium-duty trucks adopting their own chassis, front fascia, drivetrain, and suspension. A two-door cab was standard, with a four-door crew cab offered as an option. The model range was carried over from the previous generation, with the F-600, F-700, and F-800; the B-Series denoted cowled bus chassis. The medium-duty F-series shared exterior styling derived from the larger L-Series trucks.

Shifting from the rectangular grille of the F-Series and Ranger to the trapezoidal grille of the L-Series conventional and CL-Series COE, the sixth-generation medium-duty F-Series trucks adopted a taller, narrower hoodline, requiring the return of separate fenders (for the first time since the 1957 "Big Job" trucks). A traditional rear-hinged hood was standard, but the optional forward-tilting hood (in the style of the larger L-Series trucks) quickly overtook it in popularity. As a running change during 1983 (for the 1984 model year), the medium-duty F-Series replaced "F O R D" with the Ford Blue Oval grille emblem, becoming the last Ford vehicle to do so.

At its launch, the medium-duty F-Series was offered with two gasoline V8 engines and two diesel V8 engines. A 370-cubic-inch V8 was standard, with an optional 429-cubic-inch V8; both were variants of the 460 V8 developed for commercial use. The 429 became standard fitment in 1991. At its 1980 introduction, the standard diesel option was an 8.2 L Detroit Diesel "Fuel Pincher" V8 (for F-600 and F-700 trucks); the 10.4 L Caterpillar 3208 V8 made a return (redesignating F-800s as F-8000s). In 1985, Ford introduced inline-six diesel engines produced in a joint venture with New Holland in Brazil; 6.6 L and 7.8 L inline-sixes were phased in to replace the Detroit Diesel V8 and the Caterpillar 3208. In place of adding an extra "0" to the model designation, versions with the New Holland engines wore "Diesel" badging. In 1992, Ford introduced Cummins 5.9 L B-series and 8.3 L C-series straight-six diesels, phased in to replace the Ford-New Holland engines.

During its 19-year production run, the sixth-generation medium-duty F-Series received few changes outside of powertrain revisions. After the 1984 logo change, the medium-duty F-Series did not have any exterior change (aside from engine badging) until 1995, when the forward-tilting hood was standardized with a more aerodynamic design; along with an enlarged grille, and the turn signals were relocated outboard of the headlamps. With the exception of its steering column, the medium-duty F-Series used the interior and dashboard of the 1980-1986 F-Series through its entire production.

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It's a Ford Brazilian 6.6L or 401, part of the same family was a 7.8L or 474. They are similar to the Ford tractor 401 but different head and fuel systems. Many Ford pullers use the 474 or a combination of the Genesis 456 and truck 474. Pretty good engines. 

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1 hour ago, acem said:

A friend has a 80 something ford f700 with a big block 427? It runs strong but is very thirsty...

Would that be the good block for stroking?

Ace---

I believe Ford's "427" was actually a 429.

I have a '89 F-700 with factory propane.  (lots of power--------4 mpg!!!!!):blink:

I talked with a very knowledgeable shop foreman with a Ford dealer who was one of my best friends when I ran upon this truck for sale in maybe 2000 or so.

The shop foreman was a noted "hot rodder"---------he immediately told me to buy the truck; ------he wanted the engine.  Going on to tell me what all could be done to it.

Being factory L-P-------he said it would be high compression and ever switched to gasoline would need to burn high octane premium.

You are probably right with your thinking. 

Hope you are moving along with your harvest------good luck.

 

 

DD

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Your probably right Delta, It was a chicken litter spreading truck and it was rusted out bad last time I saw it. It had great power but was very thirsty! It was on propane too. Originally a delivery truck.

Harvest hasn't started yet, everythingwas planted late because ofweather. Rice heads are not turned down yet. 

Thx-Ace 

 

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"Originally a delivery delivery truck"

Mine was originally a propane delivery truck also-----found some paper work in glove box.  It originally was delivered to Springdale, Arkansas.

I bought it as cab and chassis-----put 16 ft tilt bed on it.

Powered and Geared for climbing steep Arkansas hills I reckon (5 speed/2 speed)-------runs 55 mph @ 3,300 rpm.

Don't run it much------anx not much at all here lately.   feels good to know you got some power waiting in reserve.B)

 

DD

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22 hours ago, Injpumped said:

It's a Ford Brazilian 6.6L or 401, part of the same family was a 7.8L or 474. They are similar to the Ford tractor 401 but different head and fuel systems. Many Ford pullers use the 474 or a combination of the Genesis 456 and truck 474. Pretty good engines. 

That engine was fairly common in Fords but for some reason had  very limited advertising by Ford, I think they were wanting the much cheaper made 6.9 V8 engine family in their medium duty trucks but that never happened, they ended up using mostly Cummins for their trucks after the run of Brazilian engines. or was the total truck imported from Brazil?  

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