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D282 industrial


Junk collector
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I'm curious about the power an industrial 282 has compared to an ag 282. I bought a 706 that has a 282 out of a backhoe in it. The man who had it thought it from either a 3600 or 3800 but couldn't remember for sure. This motor starts easily, makes very little smoke, and seems to run exceptionally strong. I've had other 70 to 75hp tractors and this one seems much stronger than my others. I owned a 282 powered 706 years ago and hated it enough to put a 263 in it and never had nice words for a 282. However,  I have fallen in Love with this one.

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For some reason 74hp seems to stick in my mind for TD9B but there was different numbers for powershift vs gear but that may have been how much the drive train was consuming and turbo'd or not

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3 hours ago, hardtail said:

For some reason 74hp seems to stick in my mind for TD9B but there was different numbers for powershift vs gear but that may have been how much the drive train was consuming and turbo'd or not

It all depended on the application; in the construction version the power shift was a naturally aspirated D282 rated at 75 HP flywheel @2300 rpm, the gear drive was a turbocharged DT282 rated at 66 HP @1700 rpm. The ag version TD9B was turbocharged rated at 75 HP flywheel @1850 rpm.  The D282 industrial was rated 91 HP flywheel @2400 rpm. It depended on the pump specifications. Different applications used different pump settings, the D282's were rated anywhere between 1500-2500 rpm.  

IH D282 Industrial engine.jpg

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11 hours ago, 885 said:

Dumb question, but are the bellhousing patterns on the industrial the same as a ag 282. Meaning does the ag 282 have a sae 3 pattern or does it have a different rear cover

Not a rear cover per se, but an adapter plate. But no, the tractor bell housing is "large frame IH" not any SAE pattern. 

The adapter plate bolts on to the rear of the block. The block itself is not open in the rear.

It sure would be nice if IH had used an SAE bell housing on the tractors. It would have made engine swaps easy, and opened the door for a lot of odd combinations to make people scratch their heads and ask why.

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26 minutes ago, Junk collector said:

The guy who put the motor in this tractor told me he used the plate from the 263 he removed from it

That's because the D282 block is externally identical to the C263 block. You can even stick a distributor in the diesel block where the tach drive comes out so you can mess with people at tractor shows.

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Never seen a spin on fuel filter set up on the 282.  Obviously this is the industrial carry over.  Looks like a nice setup compared to the canister filters.

Scott

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50 minutes ago, VacDaddyt said:

A late C263 crankshaft supercedes into a D282 engine. I have done that swap. 

You specify "late" so I won't argue. I do know that more than half the broken D282 cranks I have seen were junkyard cranks with casting numbers ground off. C301 is another crank with same dimensions but different number.

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27 minutes ago, snoshoe said:

That is an adapter setup.

No I said fuel not oil.

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2 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

so you can mess with people at tractor shows.

Drill and tap the core plugs under the injectors and install spark plugs and wires... and a little starting tank somewhere...

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9 hours ago, snoshoe said:

You specify "late" so I won't argue. I do know that more than half the broken D282 cranks I have seen were junkyard cranks with casting numbers ground off. C301 is another crank with same dimensions but different number.

Actually the diesel crank ended up in the gasoline engine when I think about it. Still running and the guy who bought it off me still rubs it into my face how well it runs, he got the better running one of the two I had at that time. 

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There was a bulletin of which cranks depending on the hardness you could use in that series block, also the gear for the timing train is the exact same part number. Not sure if I can find it though as that was 4 or more years ago.

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14 hours ago, acem said:

I thought they used to d282 in the 656 tractor, 715 combine and a cotton picker into the mid 70s?

Thx-Ace 

I don’t know what the 715 used upon introduction.  But according to the manuals I have for my 715, they used the d301 before switching to the German 310. 

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