Jump to content

Load Rejected…


Recommended Posts

One of our drivers was at the Cargill soybean processor plant in Kansas City today. There was a small line and a guy in front of him was mad. He asked him what the deal was and he said they had rejected his load. He asked what was wrong with the beans and he said they refused to let him unload because he was over 150,000 lb gross weight. He had a ͏f͏our axle tractor and a three axle trailer, but that is the heaviest load that I have ever seen anyone bring in there. I have never seen them reject a load for being overweight, but I have never seen someone that heavy before. I did see a different elevator in Kansas City unload a 138,000 lb load of corn before. I’m sure the DOT would have loved to have stopped him. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

43 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

One of our drivers was at the Cargill soybean processor plant in Kansas City today. There was a small line and a guy in front of him was mad. He asked him what the deal was and he said they had rejected his load. He asked what was wrong with the beans and he said they refused to let him unload because he was over 150,000 lb gross weight. He had a ͏f͏our axle tractor and a three axle trailer, but that is the heaviest load that I have ever seen anyone bring in there. I have never seen them reject a load for being overweight, but I have never seen someone that heavy before. I did see a different elevator in Kansas City unload a 138,000 lb load of corn before. I’m sure the DOT would have loved to have stopped him. 

Never heard of that either.  I’ve had loads up to 160,000 lbs at our elevator. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Years ago I heard a rumor of someplace that let the dot tie into their scales. I don’t know where it was, it wasn’t local to me. I think I heard there were some legal challenges to it based on entrapment?  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you need to run that heavy to make your loads work, you probably should raise your rates!

 I saw an elevator in Byers Colorado reject a load of wheat, 35 years ago, because he was over 100,000. He didn’t make it the 20 miles back to the farm before he split his trailer in two. 
4 axle truck and 3 axle trailer only get you to 96,000 in Nebraska, 90,000 in Kansas, and 85,000 in MO, I think. 
 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, 1256pickett said:

Years ago I heard a rumor of someplace that let the dot tie into their scales. I don’t know where it was, it wasn’t local to me. I think I heard there were some legal challenges to it based on entrapment?  

MN will allow you a certain amount over 80,000. if hit the scale above that limit you have to leave and dump some off or dump on their propertyand they won't print the ticket until you're "legal", reason being is that that DOT has the right to come onsite and demand to see all scale tickets because the state certifies that the scale weights are correct. any over weight tickets ,both the trucker and the scale operator get fined.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen loads over 140K here. Never heard of anybody ever rejected for weight. I know you guys don't allow GVWs as high as the states in the Upper Midwest do. All the gravel haulers exploit South Dakota's bridge laws to every advantage they can get away with.

True story about law enforcement and elevators here in SD. Back in the 1980s, a South Dakota highway patrolman entered an elevator right at harvest time....wanting to see the scale tickets of all the trucks coming in. Mysteriously......every truck in line to the scale/pit just "quit and would no longer start up and run". While these guys distracted the Highway Patrolman....the elevator manager contacted the elevator's lawyer about the legality of the Hi-Po doing this. The lawyer told the manager that since the elevator was private property, he could ask the Patrolman to leave the premises with no repercussions...and that he had no legal standing being there. After putting up a fight, the Hi-Po did eventually leave. Amazingly, after he left, every truck in line to the scale/pit would start up and run again.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, jass1660 said:

Our local elevator raises heck with the driver if over 110k. We are an 80k state they say its hard on the scale only rated at so many tons. 

That elevator would be out of business here with that weight limit.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Never heard of that before. If you think about it, its stupid. You're in theroy supposed to protecting the roads with weight limits. You refuse to dump above said party. He leaves and drives on above stated roads in theroy causing more damage and wear on them instead of just dumping him.

During harvest you are allowed 10% overage here. 

Of course where im from the weights a few of you guys are talking about are either childs play or just a day in the office here. 

Seen a couple here gross 180,000. Most places have scales to handle it or split weigh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

That elevator would be out of business here with that weight limit.  

Big difference between states. 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Michigan,Wyoming and Oklahoma should all go back to 80,000 pounds until they figure out how to make a smooth road!!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, SDman said:

I've seen loads over 140K here. Never heard of anybody ever rejected for weight. I know you guys don't allow GVWs as high as the states in the Upper Midwest do. All the gravel haulers exploit South Dakota's bridge laws to every advantage they can get away with.

True story about law enforcement and elevators here in SD. Back in the 1980s, a South Dakota highway patrolman entered an elevator right at harvest time....wanting to see the scale tickets of all the trucks coming in. Mysteriously......every truck in line to the scale/pit just "quit and would no longer start up and run". While these guys distracted the Highway Patrolman....the elevator manager contacted the elevator's lawyer about the legality of the Hi-Po doing this. The lawyer told the manager that since the elevator was private property, he could ask the Patrolman to leave the premises with no repercussions...and that he had no legal standing being there. After putting up a fight, the Hi-Po did eventually leave. Amazingly, after he left, every truck in line to the scale/pit would start up and run again.

That story is absolutely true, happened in Ohio in ‘92 when the Bill Clinton fuel came out. Brokers hauling in limestone from Sandusky back east to an asphalt plant. Motor Carrier Enforcement came in and started dipping tanks. Was asked to leave, which they did, but sat a short distance away on a state route , waiting for them. Word quickly spread. Trucks, empty or loaded , jammed the lots on both ends of the haul, due to private property protection as SDman stated. Some guys called for legal fuel and changed it on site, others waited til dark and made a break for it.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

Big difference between states. 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Michigan,Wyoming and Oklahoma should all go back to 80,000 pounds until they figure out how to make a smooth road!!

Never will happen. Cant get enough trucks to haul stuff now. 

Part of the problem is state road funding being siphoned off on for other BS. The 80,000 pound states have some s-itty roads too. Its all in how funds are alloted.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

That elevator would be out of business here with that weight limit.  

As stated 80k state and with harvest permit and allowed route to and back from elevator during harvest can run 88k. Not many elevators around and lots of dot and portable scales not to mention town Barney Fife’s. One nailed me in a six wheeler last fall for 5k over on the tandems. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Lazy WP said:

4 axle truck and 3 axle trailer only get you to 96,000 in Nebraska, 90,000 in Kansas, and 85,000 in MO, I think. 

He was way over no matter how you slice it. He almost certainly came in and left on I-29, that’s about the only way to get there. I guarantee if they caught him on an interstate with that weight he would have been parked until he got it legal with a scoop shovel, grain vac, whatever. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

One of our drivers was at the Cargill soybean processor plant in Kansas City today. There was a small line and a guy in front of him was mad. He asked him what the deal was and he said they had rejected his load. He asked what was wrong with the beans and he said they refused to let him unload because he was over 150,000 lb gross weight. He had a ͏f͏our axle tractor and a three axle trailer, but that is the heaviest load that I have ever seen anyone bring in there. I have never seen them reject a load for being overweight, but I have never seen someone that heavy before. I did see a different elevator in Kansas City unload a 138,000 lb load of corn before. I’m sure the DOT would have loved to have stopped him. 

  Not unheard of around here.  But you can haul "heavy" if you have the permits along with the correct truck and trailer.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are 3 farmers with big wagons that our local elevator won't let on scales with 2 big wagons due to being hard on the scale. They put a new scale in probly 3 yr ago and the scale co told them to increase scale life reduce the excessively high wts. So they pull a big one with a smaller one behind.  There smallest wagons are J&M 540s, the big ones are Grain Train 1100s. The 1100s are 6 wheel center dumps

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, 1480x3 said:

There are 3 farmers with big wagons that our local elevator won't let on scales with 2 big wagons due to being hard on the scale. They put a new scale in probly 3 yr ago and the scale co told them to increase scale life reduce the excessively high wts. So they pull a big one with a smaller one behind.  There smallest wagons are J&M 540s, the big ones are Grain Train 1100s. The 1100s are 6 wheel center dumps

I wish we were close enough to a market to use wagons. There are no country elevators left here. Everything has to go at least 30 miles. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, jass1660 said:

As stated 80k state and with harvest permit and allowed route to and back from elevator during harvest can run 88k. Not many elevators around and lots of dot and portable scales not to mention town Barney Fife’s. One nailed me in a six wheeler last fall for 5k over on the tandems. 

Super Bs from Canada are allowed 140K if they go no less then 30 miles from the border.  We are allowed around 108K on ours.  I can run 88K any time I want on our 3 axle trailer plus 10% during harvest.  Lot of the commercial guys and some farmers will pull a triple axle trailer and a pup behind them.  I have a neighbor with a 4 axle grain trailer and tag on the truck.  The main elevator we go to has a DOT scale house in route.  Were we take our durum there is two but one is close most of the time.  Other then commercial haulers on here, I bet I’ve been through scales more then most guys on here 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guys....I'm gonna plead ignorance on this as I have been out of the "weight limits game" for South Dakota for so long I have no idea on this....but what can either of these units shown haul legally? The first unit is owned by the large grain elevator association in NE South Dakota....they own a fleet of those trucks to haul grain between all their elevators. The other one is owned by a local farming operation. Either setup is pretty commonplace around here anymore for hauling grain.

Also, how do states that strictly enforce the 80K weight limit haul Quadtracs on their roads on a truck? Our big delivery truck is permitted for 104K just for hauling them. 

20220809_180728.jpg

20220809_180939.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, SDman said:

I've seen loads over 140K here. Never heard of anybody ever rejected for weight. I know you guys don't allow GVWs as high as the states in the Upper Midwest do. All the gravel haulers exploit South Dakota's bridge laws to every advantage they can get away with.

True story about law enforcement and elevators here in SD. Back in the 1980s, a South Dakota highway patrolman entered an elevator right at harvest time....wanting to see the scale tickets of all the trucks coming in. Mysteriously......every truck in line to the scale/pit just "quit and would no longer start up and run". While these guys distracted the Highway Patrolman....the elevator manager contacted the elevator's lawyer about the legality of the Hi-Po doing this. The lawyer told the manager that since the elevator was private property, he could ask the Patrolman to leave the premises with no repercussions...and that he had no legal standing being there. After putting up a fight, the Hi-Po did eventually leave. Amazingly, after he left, every truck in line to the scale/pit would start up and run again.

My true story. We had a contractor hauling lots of sand to a freeway project. I had a project not too far way. I scoped out the trucks in my county road commission car. They looked heavy and we were getting complaints on their speed.

So i reported by findings to the boss. he says our weigh-master is on vacation. So I said let me borrow the weigh masters truck. I go park on the shoulder of the road just outside the pit. I make deliberate eye contact with a couple trucks leaving. It was interesting, the next loaded trucks coming out made a u-turn on the drive and went back into  the pit to lighten their loads.  I sat there a while then went to my project. After I did my thing there, I went back and parked out side the pit driveway.  Same thing, back in the pit to dump some.

When the weigh-master was back, I'd go sit there with my county car, make eye contact with the loaded trucks and work on my project paperwork. If they turned around, I'd leave and call the weigh master. He'd go run a few over the portable scales. There was going to be 4-500 trucks to one big interchange.

My boss called the contractor. He asked if they would be running legal or will we need to run them over the portable scales? They backed down the loads.  I had fun sittng at the pit gate:)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, SDman said:

Guys....I'm gonna plead ignorance on this as I have been out of the "weight limits game" for South Dakota for so long I have no idea on this....but what can either of these units shown haul legally? The first unit is owned by the large grain elevator association in NE South Dakota....they own a fleet of those trucks to haul grain between all their elevators. The other one is owned by a local farming operation. Either setup is pretty commonplace around here anymore for hauling grain.

Also, how do states that strictly enforce the 80K weight limit haul Quadtracs on their roads on a truck? Our big delivery truck is permitted for 104K just for hauling them. 

20220809_180728.jpg

20220809_180939.jpg

They look like some of our normal haulers around here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the South Dakota rules. And Montana . South Dakota can be 129,000 and 81 or so feet of trailer on select roads. With a special permit. Montana  weights are in graph also. Nowhere close to 150,000 anyplace.

DD637E91-752E-4321-919E-1C16DA324A44.png

9A6B1F82-65FC-4141-B234-8BCC3C392D45.png

1D57FFB5-1C22-4537-925F-EF581C5BA936.png

FC4EDC46-EB68-4B23-B3CA-47B1351A6CB7.png

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I always say never ask a log truck driver what his truck weighs and expect an honest answer.

I haul pulp wood to two different paper mills. The first mill weighs up to 184,000. If you are over that weight they have a special yard close to the scale where the driver can bail off some of the load, usually about three or four cords. Then they can weigh in, get unloaded, weigh out and reload what they bailed off and do it again as a separate load. There needs to be a 10,000 pound difference in The inbound vs outbound weight to make a ticket. I've not had to do that yet but I have been to that yard a couple times because I had an oversize stick I needed to trim.

The other mill on the other hand, the scale displays all dashes if the truck is over 200,000...so I've been told by some of the other drivers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...