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Planter plate spacing....


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2 hours ago, acem said:

You backed onto the planter with the front pipe on the ground. The front pipe is picked up and mounted to a bracket on the frame rails. Then the rear is attached to the 2/3 pt, I think the lower arms were removed and it attached to the top arms with chains. It's been a long time so my memories are fuzzy. When I was a kid I spent many hours sitting on an old cultivator seat mounted to the back of the planter. I was the planter monitor...

The planters worked good in cotton and soybeans with full tillage. The best soybeans yield we ever made was planted with this planter, on top of beds with perfect weather. 40 bushel per acre. My ground is too wet for good soybeans.

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I recognize the first brochure. There was a guy on Ebay, some years ago, that had just started digging through his recently passed father's former IH dealership. It was somewhere in AR or MS. He had that brochure in with a stack of 5 other ones for $40 & I never pulled the trigger on that auction. Thought it was too expensive in the days of $1-$2 literature & manuals. Now that offer is loooong gone & I haven't seen a notice from his Ebay store in a couple years. Fairly certain it was the same guy that had a NOS cultivator for a Super C.

Anyhow....

What exactly does that odd mounting setup do to make cotton planting better with that machine?

Mike

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2 hours ago, acem said:

I don't know why they show cotton being planted flat. Cotton is always planted on beds. Probably the pics were taken up north.

There was also a 3 pt model, 88? They weren't very popular.

Skip row cotton was a big thing back when we had set aside. You planted 2/3 of the field by skipping every third row. The other two rows grew better because of the extra sun.  I never saw a skip row planter. Normally the chain was taken off the row.

 

Thx-Ace 

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I had figured that pic was taken on a test farm in IL. That land is awfully flat. Then again, I'm not familiar with the terrain in south central cotton & rice country. Is it fairly flat there?

Were 3 row pickers used in skip row cotton?

Mike

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On the populations  and spacing you got to remember things were a LOT different when those planters were new. Even in the days of mounted corn pickers in the 50s and 60s row widths were 40" tho 38 would work. When farmall regulars and f 20s were new corn was still planted In 40" or 42" pattern so it could be cultivated cross ways as well as the direction the planter ran to plant it. Not sure when that fell out of popularity.  That's why those old cultivators were "steerable" so you could dodge around plants that got a bit out of pattern somehow. 

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The ground in the delta, where the best cotton is grown is flat. It's grown on beds for drainage and irrigation. Pull type planters don't work well on beds. The belly mount planters are very stable and easy to keep on the bed when set up right. 3pt planters are standard for planting on beds now.

They may have planted dryland cotton flat out west. I've not been around it much. They grown alot of cotton on the plains from Central Kansas down through Amarillo and Abilene Texas.

Skip row cotton was a thing back in the days of set aside. I haven't seen any  since set aside went away.

They grew cotton all over the place a hundred years ago. There were gins up in the mountains...

Thx-Ace 

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Here's the plate information from my 800 planter parts book. Hopefully I got pics of all the pages...

There are more plates available from companies like Lincoln.

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According to my manual on my c221 is dropping every kernel 16 inches for 1927A flat drop plate . 
3075A ,a is dropping 32 inches on my c221 

dah ! Half the openings twice the distance dah !

im learning ,I think that’s right  ? 

dad use drop them on the driveway and measure and count to make sure the machine was working. 
 

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8 hours ago, acem said:

They grew cotton all over the place a hundred years ago. There were gins up in the mountains...

Yes there were. Matter of fact, the gin at Franklin is still there, though long closed down. Our gin closed in 1967, one year after my great grandfather planted his last cotton crop. It was a whopping 2.5 acres if I remember correctly, and he used horses to work it. I grow a couple rows in the garden yet, for the wife's spinning wheel projects. 

@Absent Minded Farmer, I  meant to ask you, what do you aim to do with your Hickory King? We grew that some years ago but couldn't get the seed anymore so switched to Truckers Favorite White. The Hickory King made the very best cornmeal I remember. My wife's grandfather had a small gristmill and we would take our corn to him when I was a little boy. He'd grind it for a share of the meal. Her uncle still has the mill, but it hasn't been used in years. I've got a fairly middlin stand of corn this year, and I've about convinced her uncle to fire it up and grind us a bit of meal come fall. 

Mac

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23 hours ago, iowaboy1965 said:

On the populations  and spacing you got to remember things were a LOT different when those planters were new. Even in the days of mounted corn pickers in the 50s and 60s row widths were 40" tho 38 would work. When farmall regulars and f 20s were new corn was still planted In 40" or 42" pattern so it could be cultivated cross ways as well as the direction the planter ran to plant it. Not sure when that fell out of popularity.  That's why those old cultivators were "steerable" so you could dodge around plants that got a bit out of pattern somehow. 

Yeah, I remember after being reminded. Lol! What you said about population between then vs now, that reminded me of all the videos out there where the harvesting machine has to crawl through corn, beans, oats, etc. The yields just were not what they are now, then.

Eventually, a 6RN 30" planter would be nice for shell corn. I would stick to the wider rows for sweet corn. As for a steerable cultivator..... that's a prerequisite. I can't plant a straight row to save my soul. But, you get more seed in a crooked row, so it's said.

Mike

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20 hours ago, acem said:

The ground in the delta, where the best cotton is grown is flat. It's grown on beds for drainage and irrigation. Pull type planters don't work well on beds. The belly mount planters are very stable and easy to keep on the bed when set up right. 3pt planters are standard for planting on beds now.

They may have planted dryland cotton flat out west. I've not been around it much. They grown alot of cotton on the plains from Central Kansas down through Amarillo and Abilene Texas.

Skip row cotton was a thing back in the days of set aside. I haven't seen any  since set aside went away.

They grew cotton all over the place a hundred years ago. There were gins up in the mountains...

Thx-Ace 

So, the frame around the tires that goes to the belly of the tractor is for stability? That makes sense. That may also explain why there are so many tool bar planters down your way. Keeps things rigid.

I take it set aside was a form of CRP or whatever it is these days?

When I was interested in going to "cotton school" at A&M yeeeeears ago, the teacher I was speaking with said cotton has been experimented with in 49 out of 50 states at some point in history. If memory serves, the shorter days & shorter seasons are what kept cotton from catching on in my neck of the woods. He also told me that the genetics lab does some pretty amazing things, so don't be surprised if a variety becomes available for the northern states at some point in the near future. Wonder how the lab is coming with that? That conversation must have been 20 years ago already.

Mike

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19 hours ago, 560Dennis said:

According to my manual on my c221 is dropping every kernel 16 inches for 1927A flat drop plate . 
3075A ,a is dropping 32 inches on my c221 

dah ! Half the openings twice the distance dah !

im learning ,I think that’s right  ? 

dad use drop them on the driveway and measure and count to make sure the machine was working. 
 

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8ED2CAF0-4846-4FE8-9F9C-A926DB516917.jpeg

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It's interesting to note, your mounted 220 & my trailer 230 are from the same era & the drive sprockets are different. Guess my observation that the two machines are similar is a bit off.

Mike

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12 hours ago, MacAR said:

Yes there were. Matter of fact, the gin at Franklin is still there, though long closed down. Our gin closed in 1967, one year after my great grandfather planted his last cotton crop. It was a whopping 2.5 acres if I remember correctly, and he used horses to work it. I grow a couple rows in the garden yet, for the wife's spinning wheel projects. 

@Absent Minded Farmer, I  meant to ask you, what do you aim to do with your Hickory King? We grew that some years ago but couldn't get the seed anymore so switched to Truckers Favorite White. The Hickory King made the very best cornmeal I remember. My wife's grandfather had a small gristmill and we would take our corn to him when I was a little boy. He'd grind it for a share of the meal. Her uncle still has the mill, but it hasn't been used in years. I've got a fairly middlin stand of corn this year, and I've about convinced her uncle to fire it up and grind us a bit of meal come fall. 

Mac

I hadn't thought about corn meal from the Hickory King. That has to be some good grits!! I'll keep that in mind. I use it to make my own corn nuts. Figured that idea out when in Washington State. One of the farmers market vendors used that in a home made snack mix. It was their secret ingredient. That concept didn't last long after I blabbed & said what it was, not knowing it was supposed to remain mum. Upon questioning, I mentioned the seed I had came in a seed corn sampler that was ordered up a few years before I moved. The couple that made the mix got excited & ended up ordering a sampler for themselves & started making different mixes with the different varieties. Think it was the Truckers Yellow & the Yellow dent that didn't work so well, as they were tough kernels.

I'll be adding a grist mill to my list of things to get. Already want a stone mill for making flour. The cornmeal should give me a decent trifecta of salable goods for some time to come. The third being hemp, but I don't want to grow it for CBD. I have no problem with that, there just isn't enough industrial hemp products out there. Would like to have some hemp binder twine to see if it's any better than sisalana.

Oh, before I forget again.... the Hickory King & my other corn selections come from RH Shumway. Think the sizes are ranged from 1/4 lb on up to 50. The seed is not graded, mind you, so you'll need grading sieves or an air planter or just plant by hand.

Mike

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Took some photos of what in the seed hopper (Richmond) before I lose something . Got the pan hot with purple power and water to boil out the crow repellent crude and paint it . Should powder coat but I’m not 

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2 hours ago, 560Dennis said:

Took some photos of what in the seed hopper (Richmond) before I lose something . Got the pan hot with purple power and water to boil out the crow repellent crude and paint it . Should powder coat but I’m not 

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Those hopper bottoms look to be in good shape yet. Are the cutoff & knocker springs still decent? They don't look too crusty in your pics.

Mike

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9 minutes ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

Those hopper bottoms look to be in good shape yet. Are the cutoff & knocker springs still decent? They don't look too crusty in your pics.

Mike

The three springs on this side are excellent , we’ll see when I take the other side apart .only doing one side at a time ,for reassembly reason s  . 
psrings are sort of easy to get ,

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13 hours ago, 560Dennis said:

The three springs on this side are excellent , we’ll see when I take the other side apart .only doing one side at a time ,for reassembly reason s  . 
psrings are sort of easy to get ,

Already missing a part in photo. Found in the boiling pan ! Magnets search 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I’m a rookie corn planter guy , just know one side of this planter was crushing seed. What I remember. These samples only thing I have to go on. 3324A was the plate in the planter at the time 60 years ago when this would happen .
(lastest issue I see is left side chain from wheel is binding ,why don’t know but that may be the cause .

o
Is this 3324A the best option for new hybrid corn today ?

3324A was in the hoppers ,dark in one and lighter in the other. This seed is 60 years old . Is new seed changed ? Assume it has .

Hope Absent Farmer doesn’t mind but a lot of information in yours that I can look thru I haven’t seen before 

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