Jump to content

Planter plate spacing....


Recommended Posts

I've been hunting for some plates for my planter & see that there are two offerings for the flat drop plates with the 3/4" holes. One is a 1927A with 16 cells & the other is a 3075A with 8 cells. What is the spacing between the seeds when they hit the ground with those plates? Can't seem to find the info. It's either not in any of my books or I miss it because I'm looking for it.

Thanks!

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

I've been hunting for some plates for my planter & see that there are two offerings for the flat drop plates with the 3/4" holes. One is a 1927A with 16 cells & the other is a 3075A with 8 cells. What is the spacing between the seeds when they hit the ground with those plates? Can't seem to find the info. It's either not in any of my books or I miss it because I'm looking for it.

Thanks!

Mike

What are you planting?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, ksfarmdude said:

What are you planting?

Hickory King & it needs an 8" - 12" spacing in the row. I'm thinking it's the 3075A plate that may be needed.

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spacing is dependant on the population you are trying to achive,  The  higher  the population the spacing will be less the planter manual will tell you the drive combination used to get a specific population and spacing for various row widths. The number of cells has more to do with the speed you want to travel  to achieve higher populations you would over speed an 8 cell plate rather quickly so you would have to drive terribly slow ,  An 16 cell  plate could double your ground speed either plate could be used to create that spacing its the sprocket ratio of seed plate turns  to drive tire travel that determines the spacing .

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What planter model are you using?  I assume it is an IH.  I have no experience with IH planters, but do with John Deere, Covington and Cole.  All use a set of sprockets on chains or direct drive to vary the speed that the plate spins.  The John Deere 51 Unit planters I have talk about seed population and you then need to find the chart on the internet that will break it down into actual seed spacing in the row.  The Covington and Cole are even easier since they tell you exactly what your seed spacing will be based upon the cell count on the plate and the sprocket you are using.   Seed population is based upon the number of plants per acre and the actual row spacing.  See attached population charts.

Bill

plant population per acre_Page_1.png

plant population per acre_Page_2.png

plant population per acre_Page_3.png

plant population per acre_Page_4.png

plant population per acre_Page_5.png

  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have some IH plates and no longer have a planter. Let me check in the next few days and see if I have any you mentioned.  How many rows is your planter?

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

there should be different sprokets to change to change population/spacing. the best way is put some seed in planter and drive on hard ground and see how far apart seeds are and adjust from that.

pete

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, this may not be helpful, but it might give you an idea. This is from my IH 184 planter manual:

20220807_173808.thumb.jpg.9056de72d43fcdbab24f3d15a12e4734.jpg20220807_173756.thumb.jpg.499f35e8800d5e18387d6941c55a735a.jpg

The 184 is press wheel driven, so that makes a bit of difference. Essentially, an 8 cell will plant twice the distance and 16 will. 

Mac

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What model planter ya runnin?

I'm running a caseih 900 plate planter now and have the tables for  the 800 and 900.

If you get one seed per hole you can get a great variation of spacing depending on which sprockets you use.

Thx-Ace 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/6/2022 at 6:26 PM, R190 said:

Spacing is dependant on the population you are trying to achive,  The  higher  the population the spacing will be less the planter manual will tell you the drive combination used to get a specific population and spacing for various row widths. The number of cells has more to do with the speed you want to travel  to achieve higher populations you would over speed an 8 cell plate rather quickly so you would have to drive terribly slow ,  An 16 cell  plate could double your ground speed either plate could be used to create that spacing its the sprocket ratio of seed plate turns  to drive tire travel that determines the spacing .

At the moment, I'm trying to get the planter into working order & hadn't given population much thought. So, I'm glad you brought that up. Looking at what's in the manual, there aren't a whole lot of options & should be easy to figure out. If the 16 cell plate is used, the variable drop gets set to 4 & the chain gets moved to the medium sprocket for 8-1/4" spacing.

There sure are some long distances, between seeds, on that chart. I would guess the 58" distance would be for something like pumpkins? That's quite a stretch for most other crops.

Mike

IMG_20220808_110747.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/6/2022 at 6:39 PM, barkerwc4362 said:

What planter model are you using? 

It's an IH 220 or 230 planter, 2RW on the steel closing wheels.  I hadn't thought of the planting chart in the manual. Glad you said something. There aren't a whole lot of options for gearing on that planter, so it should be easy.

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/6/2022 at 10:31 PM, Sledgehammer said:

I have some IH plates and no longer have a planter. Let me check in the next few days and see if I have any you mentioned.  How many rows is your planter?

That would be greatly appreciated. It's a two row 220 or 230.

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/7/2022 at 6:31 AM, DHF said:

there should be different sprokets to change to change population/spacing. the best way is put some seed in planter and drive on hard ground and see how far apart seeds are and adjust from that.

pete

Once I get the planter freed up, I'll give that a try.

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, acem said:

What model planter ya runnin?

I'm running a caseih 900 plate planter now and have the tables for  the 800 and 900.

If you get one seed per hole you can get a great variation of spacing depending on which sprockets you use.

Thx-Ace 

 

It's either a 220 or a 230 2 row with the steel press wheels. Not quite as fancy as the 800, but it should still get the job done.

I've often wondered about the 400/800/900 plate planters. Is there a particular use for them or do they still plant better than the units with the Cyclo setup?

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Yup about the only thing we can say from the information provided is that the spacing will be twice as far apart with the 8-hole plates as the 16-hole. Sorry.

No issue here. I didn't initially take into consideration, the amount of different sprocket combo's there are between the different planters made throughout the years. Mine is a McCormick 220 or 230 2 row on steel press wheels. Think I have the spacing figured out now, with the chart in the manual. Been concerned with the mechanical issues so far & forgot about the settings. Glad there's this site here, to help keep my marbles all in the same bag. Lol!

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

There sure are some long distances, between seeds, on that chart. I would guess the 58" distance would be for something like pumpkins? That's quite a stretch for most other crops.

Pumpkins or melons are usually planted at those longer distances. Will your planter hill drop? If so, I think that's what the 8 cell plates are for. The 16 cell plates are more for straight drilling if memory serves, though either plate can be used for either operation if you so desire. 

Mac

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

That would be greatly appreciated. It's a two row 220 or 230.

Mike

I looked and don’t have either of those numbers handy. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Sledgehammer said:

I looked and don’t have either of those numbers handy. 

Not a problem. I appreciate you looking.

Mike

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, MacAR said:

Pumpkins or melons are usually planted at those longer distances. Will your planter hill drop? If so, I think that's what the 8 cell plates are for. The 16 cell plates are more for straight drilling if memory serves, though either plate can be used for either operation if you so desire. 

Mac

My 230 planter will do hill drop, drill & check row. The book mentions plates with alternating groups of two cells, then three, etc. for hill drop. Found that interesting.

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, acem said:

I have detailed descriptions of the plates in my manuals if that will help.

I have a manual for a 456 around here somewhere that covers the specs of the plates in greater detail. Something like what MacAR posted. Do appreciate it though. You mentioned the 86 belly mounted planter. Does that mount to the side rails by the engine? Sounds like a neat setup.

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You backed onto the planter with the front pipe on the ground. The front pipe is picked up and mounted to a bracket on the frame rails. Then the rear is attached to the 2/3 pt, I think the lower arms were removed and it attached to the top arms with chains. It's been a long time so my memories are fuzzy. When I was a kid I spent many hours sitting on an old cultivator seat mounted to the back of the planter. I was the planter monitor...

The planters worked good in cotton and soybeans with full tillage. The best soybeans yield we ever made was planted with this planter, on top of beds with perfect weather. 40 bushel per acre. My ground is too wet for good soybeans.

s-l1600 - 2022-08-09T071232.596.jpg

s-l1600 - 2022-08-09T070732.348.jpg

s-l1600 - 2022-08-09T070648.268.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know why they show cotton being planted flat. Cotton is always planted on beds. Probably the pics were taken up north.

There was also a 3 pt model, 88? They weren't very popular.

Skip row cotton was a big thing back when we had set aside. You planted 2/3 of the field by skipping every third row. The other two rows grew better because of the extra sun.  I never saw a skip row planter. Normally the chain was taken off the row.

 

Thx-Ace 

s-l1600 - 2022-08-09T071033.796.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...