Jump to content

Got a Unimog- cylinder repair advice


ryangpayne
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I recently bought a Unimog FLU419 at a local city auction. It had been sitting about 15 years. I got it running, put 4 tires on it and got it to drive up on the trailer to bring it home. It has a loader on the front and a case backhoe attachment on the rear. It’s supposed to be the same as I believe a 580e backhoe. I got all the hydraulic functions to work but need to rebuild all the cylinders on it. 
 

I bought a special tool to remove the glands off the cylinders but even with a 3/4 drive ratchet it wouldn’t attempt to budge them. I even welded the adjustable part up and welded a handle on it to hit with a sledge and couldn’t get it to move. I also tried an air hammer to break them loose. I did remove the little locking screw.


What are some better tools or techniques to use to break these down? I’ll include pics of the machine and cylinders. Thanks for any help!

 

5005EB17-9684-42AE-A042-7C03F8781468.thumb.jpeg.a5658218da8cc39f16a10d44f445e9cd.jpeg0152B8E9-F129-437D-8D15-C4E2E16C74B2.thumb.jpeg.b04d1f01f271df6a33ee69ac8b9fdd79.jpeg7B63FD06-9B48-4A25-A48B-46A2411CB865.thumb.jpeg.ebcaa65d102bb469c4b61f32687eb489.jpeg7F8553DC-B041-40B1-B317-E5D87AAAFD76.thumb.jpeg.091768ae7787d42c94682f0c96e55574.jpeg31F036FA-08CC-4055-BCEE-A7C8CF5C643B.thumb.jpeg.90cb09e5d190ae2917f586d6912d9220.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They may have lock tight on the thread. Had one on a 580K that took 4 hours of slow progress with a home made spanner and a 10’ pipe. Threads had been boogered. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hate the way some cylinders are constructed. They should all be tie bolt cylinders in my opinion. Put some heat on it. Maybe throw some wrenches and hammers just to get that out of the way, then try to rotate the gland. The worst cylinders are the Eaton (Cessna) Wyr-Loc, stupidest thing anyone ever came up with. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might take it to a hydraulic shop and have them take the cylinders apart. I had some Morris Rodweeder cylinders that refused to come apart for me this spring, they had them apart in about five minutes. Aluminum nut on a steel barrel and 40 years they were well glued together. Be a good place to get the seals and orings that you will need when you are there.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’ve rebuilt a number of cylinders of similar design on Case skid steers, no tricks to them at all.  Never hard to get apart.  Makes me think the threads on yours are rusted, although that seems unlikely as there is an O ring and backer ring between the threads and the flange of the head.  Could be rust between the O ring and the flange edge.

Can’t remember now, those might be buttress threads.  I would advise penetrant at the flange, and heat.  Be careful with the heat.  Also support the barrel right under the head when you try to crank on the head.  I would suggest applying torque via the pin wrench, and at the same time hit the other accessible pin hole with an air hammer in the direction of rotation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you get there , Broken Tractor has the best prices on packing kits i have found, and US made too

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Use a gun tap and then a bottom tap to make very good threads in the end gland pin holes then bolt a heavy made spanner to the end gland. You can beat the out side of the barrel with a herd plastic hammer to break rust. As said support as close as you can to the wrench. Some heat can help but too much will melt rubber seals to a point it causes trouble. Turning with two handles at 180 apart can help sometimes. It is not uncommon to need a ten foot cheater. I will add a pic of some gland wrenches I have made and used for many years with great success. Keep circling it, they always come in the end. I have never had to machine out a thread in gland. Good Luck

 

1/2" x 1 1/2 stub handle works good for these. You can pound with a heavy dead blow hammer you can spin it round and round when it starts moving and if welded proper it will stand any cheater pipe.

 

Cyl tools.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, just Dave said:

You can beat the out side of the barrel with a herd plastic hammer to break rust.

Not using a plastic hammer, but even tapping on an unbroken took joint while someone is using a pipe wrench to apply LH torque to break the connection, WILL work.

At least you looked for and removed the little set screw, as the barrel on our mechanical setting tool for our EZSV packers had exactly the same narrow width to get something on to remove/install the nut.  (And I personally found out what trying to remove that end piece WITHOUT removing that little set screw, does to the threads on the case).

Since you are in Cross Plains, you might want to go over to "Rebel"(?) oil field supply and see, but I doubt, if they have even a small break out machine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ford used those cylinders beginning with the first 555 up to the sellout and beyond. You can pound, pry and tug all you want, all you are going to do is mess up the holes. Look at that fastening system... not a lot of torque is used in their assembly. The guys saying heat are correct. Heat up a band about 1-1/2” wide all around the mouth of the barrel. It’s thin and will heat easily. By time the paint is burnt off that gland will screw right out of there. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you guys very much for the tips and advice. I will try all those things out in the next couple days and see what I can get done. As many cylinders as it has I’m sure hoping to find a way to get it done myself. 
 

it is an odd little machine. I believe it’s a 89 model, and has a 6 cylinder Mercedes diesel. It has a 4 speed trans with a 2 speed auxiliary and then has a air shift to split each one of those gears. I dont think the loader will be very practical but I can see me getting some use out of the backhoe part once I get it fixed up. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would suggest cracking the lines to get any possible pressure off and help let oil leak out of the threads on the gland nut. If you use heat be careful i have seen people warp the end of those barrels where the gland nut goes in on Case hoes. If you wish to heat i would gently warm the entire threaded end of the barrel where the gland nut is and use your gland nut wrench(have someone putting pressure while you are heating really helps). If that fails there is enough room on the edge to put on a pipe wrench with a bar as the last resort.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...