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Dairy cow prices....


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I was looking at one of the local CL pages & found a Jersey, recently freshened, 45" high, yadda yadda..... for $3000!!!! Can that be right or are they asking Tractorhouse prices for their milkers? I've been thinking about getting a cow or two, but I can make a lot of trips to the dairy aisle for that amount of moolah.

Is there a website out there that would keep me abreast of the prices? I'm looking into decent Ayrshire & Jersey milkers. Maybe a bull to keep them fresh. Unless AI is far cheaper.

Mike

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I’ve found CL to be full of people that don’t know what they have. Most priced too high but once in awhile I’ll find a bargain. I don’t know dairy but I’d say that one fits in the first category. 
As far as a bull, for one or two cows don’t bother. AI is a lot cheaper, not as efficient it may take a couple of shots to get breed, but a lot cheaper. 

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Too much work! If you want raw milk find a dairy farmer who'll sell it to you. A cow is 24/7/365 vs a drive every few days.

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4 hours ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

I was looking at one of the local CL pages & found a Jersey, recently freshened, 45" high, yadda yadda..... for $3000!!!! Can that be right or are they asking Tractorhouse prices for their milkers? I've been thinking about getting a cow or two, but I can make a lot of trips to the dairy aisle for that amount of moolah.

Is there a website out there that would keep me abreast of the prices? I'm looking into decent Ayrshire & Jersey milkers. Maybe a bull to keep them fresh. Unless AI is far cheaper.

Mike

I will know more in a month what prices are as we sell our herd at auction on the 1st and 2nd of September. That being said prices vary a lot within a herd because of pedigree etc. There are those with more potential than others . I'd never keep a bull , ever especially with less cows it's more economical for AI then even more. We are going to keep 4 (approximately) for the kids to milk for fresh milk and to feed the calves we are keeping 

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41 minutes ago, bitty said:

I will know more in a month what prices are as we sell our herd at auction on the 1st and 2nd of September. That being said prices vary a lot within a herd because of pedigree etc. There are those with more potential than others . I'd never keep a bull , ever especially with less cows it's more economical for AI then even more. We are going to keep 4 (approximately) for the kids to milk for fresh milk and to feed the calves we are keeping 

You selling all your cows and quitting milking Bitty?

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8 minutes ago, Jacka said:

You selling all your cows and quitting milking Bitty?

Yes, going to be doing different things in agriculture 

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Craigslist ads for cattle and calves are usually indicative of a declining market. They missed the peak prices at the cattle barn, so they're trying to find some sucker on Craigslist who doesn't know any better.

I get this weekly paper called Country Folks that has a weekly report on the local sale barns. It's a regional paper, and I'm sure there are papers for every region.

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1 hour ago, bitty said:

 I'd never keep a bull , ever especially with less cows it's more economical for AI then even more. 

Surprised that no one has mentioned safety yet. I know several farmers just in our valley that have been attacked by their herd bull. No deaths, but they were stove up pretty good for a while.

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Wow,a big decision for sure.But all things come to pass.I sold my little herd many years ago as kids got older and went to college. My tears flowed as the cows left.But it was a decision that was best at the time and still was the right one.The demands of a dairy farm many don't know or understand unless they did it.I had a feed guy tell me once when I was comparing cost of feed daily to his competitor that is just like a trucker putting fuel in a truck .I told him a trucker can park his truck you can't park a dairy cow. I wish you the best in whatever you do and know it will be a success because you have been success in the past.

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1 hour ago, ny bill o said:

Surprised that no one has mentioned safety yet. I know several farmers just in our valley that have been attacked by their herd bull. No deaths, but they were stove up pretty good for a while.

my brother worked at the local breeders for 20 plus years. back then they had 200 bulls. Ask him or his co workers and they will tell you an old Jersey bull is the meanest SOB out of all the breeds.  for a few cows a bull is not practical and you are stuck with his genetics. Use AI and get the best bull out there

 

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6 hours ago, New Englander said:

Too much work! If you want raw milk find a dairy farmer who'll sell it to you. A cow is 24/7/365 vs a drive every few days.

I don't mind the work & the BTO's around here fear their gov't & won't sell or even give from the bulk tank.

Mike

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Check the local laws. Here in Arkansas a dairy farmer can sell directly from the farm. If they transport it off farm to sell it all the special stuff gets started.

Thx-Ace 

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6 hours ago, bitty said:

I will know more in a month what prices are as we sell our herd at auction on the 1st and 2nd of September. That being said prices vary a lot within a herd because of pedigree etc. There are those with more potential than others . I'd never keep a bull , ever especially with less cows it's more economical for AI then even more. We are going to keep 4 (approximately) for the kids to milk for fresh milk and to feed the calves we are keeping 

I wish you the best for your herd dispersal & your time after it. Sounds like a good idea to hang on to a few. Might go through withdrawals otherwise. Then again, I've known guys to do a jig after their gone & never look back.

I'd rather not have a bull. They are a pain in the neck to keep after & a truly "mellow" bull is just that. Bull. Any animal can turn at any given time, including the human ones.

Mike

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11 hours ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

I was looking at one of the local CL pages & found a Jersey, recently freshened, 45" high, yadda yadda..... for $3000!!!! Can that be right or are they asking Tractorhouse prices for their milkers? I've been thinking about getting a cow or two, but I can make a lot of trips to the dairy aisle for that amount of moolah.

Is there a website out there that would keep me abreast of the prices? I'm looking into decent Ayrshire & Jersey milkers. Maybe a bull to keep them fresh. Unless AI is far cheaper.

Mike

Back when my boys were little, we had a neighbor with a real nice milk cow.

Whenever we needed milk, he would let us come over and take over one of the milkings.

Looking back we didn't realize how good we had it.

I remember Holstein bulls as the meanest most unpredictable of the breeds. 

And like @acemsaid, a beef bull will do just fine.

AI would be just as acceptable to my way of thinking

 

 

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5 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Craigslist ads for cattle and calves are usually indicative of a declining market. They missed the peak prices at the cattle barn, so they're trying to find some sucker on Craigslist who doesn't know any better.

I get this weekly paper called Country Folks that has a weekly report on the local sale barns. It's a regional paper, and I'm sure there are papers for every region.

Thanks! I'll check into that paper.

Mike

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5 hours ago, ny bill o said:

Surprised that no one has mentioned safety yet.

And I appreciate that thought. I'm not wholly devoid of being around cows, steers, pigs, etc. But.... it just hasn't been much & I would not consider myself an old head by a long shot.

Already had a scare early on in life & I'm glad it was a mild one. A Guernsey cow was enjoying a good head scratching from me & kept leaning into the fence. And leaning, and leaning. The post just to my right cracked & I bolted to the house. After telling my great uncle what had happened, he told me don't get too friendly with them. They don't know how big they are & I'm lucky the cow didn't flatten me with love.

Mike

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18 minutes ago, acem said:

Check the local laws. Here in Arkansas a dairy farmer can sell directly from the farm. If they transport it off farm to sell it all the special stuff gets started.

Thx-Ace 

There are a good many states that allow bulk sales to some extent. That includes the land of fruits, nuts & flakes. Thinking back on it, they may have pioneered the movement. Think they still out produce America's Dairyland in bulk production, too. That leaves us with cheese production & 10,000 flavors of fru-fru beer. Yuck! Well, the flavored beers, not the cheese.... GLORIOUS CHEESE!!!!!!!

Mike

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had a Holstein bull that was one ornery ******* ... a ring in his nose meant nothing so i added about 5' of sturdy chain for him to step on all the time, even that was just a temporary fix to his attitude problem, had to use the skid steer to get him pushed on the cattle haulers trailer for his final ride to the sale barn.

 

had a 16 year old second cousin who was killed by their families bull

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26 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Back when my boys were little, we had a neighbor with a real nice milk cow.

Whenever we needed milk, he would let us come over and take over one of the milkings.

Looking back we didn't realize how good we had it.

I remember Holstein bulls as the meanest most unpredictable of the breeds. 

And like @acemsaid, a beef bull will do just fine.

AI would be just as acceptable to my way of thinking

 

 

Until I was about 15 or 16, there was usually fresh milk to be had from my one uncle. I remember how great it was & how long it took to readjust to the taste of milk in a plastic jug that had the flavor cooked out of it. Then milk in glass bottles hit the shelves around here & it was ok, but not the same. And some of those places fed out a bit too much corn silage. Had milk that tasted like creamed corn.

Will certainly look into the AI.

Mike

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2 minutes ago, Takn4aFool said:

had to use the skid steer to get him pushed on the cattle haulers trailer for his final ride to the sale barn.

I bet it was a happy day after that ordeal. Turning that one into hamburger would have been quite satisfying, in my book.

Mike

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17 minutes ago, Absent Minded Farmer said:

Until I was about 15 or 16, there was usually fresh milk to be had from my one uncle. I remember how great it was & how long it took to readjust to the taste of milk in a plastic jug that had the flavor cooked out of it. Then milk in glass bottles hit the shelves around here & it was ok, but not the same. And some of those places fed out a bit too much corn silage. Had milk that tasted like creamed corn.

Will certainly look into the AI.

Mike

I don’t know the laws for sure but I think around here the farmer can’t sell raw milk but can sell a percentage of a cow to you and then give you the milk. Last I heard one neighbor was doing it that way with their 5 cows. 

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5 minutes ago, 1256pickett said:

I don’t know the laws for sure but I think around here the farmer can’t sell raw milk but can sell a percentage of a cow to you and then give you the milk. Last I heard one neighbor was doing it that way with their 5 cows. 

That sounds about right. It's been a few years since I read up on raw milk sales, but I think it was Agri-View that kept up with that news. Think Pete on Just A Few Acres has said something in the past about it too.

I'll have to look again, when I get a minute & see what's been updated here in Wi. & elsewhere.

Mike

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the head scratching is a real no no with bulls . one day you won't give him a scratch and he won't like it

 I cannot stress how dangerous any bull can be but don't take the Jersey too lightly because the cows are small and nice to work with once you get past how stubborn they can be. but  I love the little things. Congrats on getting a few cows btw. 👍

this source seems to back up what I have grown to take as fact https://homesteadontherange.com/2014/03/12/jersey/

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That said, there are definitely breeds that have earned better reputations for disposition than others. Jersey bulls are downright vicious

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The bull is something to be reckoned with. The general consensus on Jersey bulls is that they are some of the most vicious farm animals in existence. Horror stories abound about these unpredictable creatures. Suffice it to say that only an extremely experienced individual should even consider owning a Jersey bull.

 

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