Jump to content

Need to replace a wood post in a concrete feedlot....


Recommended Posts

How does one go about doing that? The post is rotten & I'm the fortunate party that has been tasked by the neighbor to figure out how to change it out. The only thing I can figure is, cut the post off flush, dig most of the rest of the post down to the dirt line & break out the concrete around it. Drop a new post in & add fresh mud. Is that about right or is there an easier way? Dynamite? C4? Something???

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a couple that were loose enough to hook a chain to and pull out with loader. Then break a little of the old cement around to reset new post. Of course there were a couple others that were rotted off so bad they broke. Then proceed as you said with dig out the rest. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 2 or 3 times the last 40 yrs i got lucky as i was able to pull the old 6x6 with a loader and i had the new post ready to slide right back in the hole & push it down with the loader. Was fortunate to never have one bust off flush with concrete

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, nomorejohndeere said:

Wood in concrete = rot

Eliminate needless words! Eliminate needless words! Eliminate needless words!

Or so said Will Strunk in his book about proper English usage.

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

I would just use a heavy post anchor plate on top of the concrete fasten with some stainless lags 

you can fill the old hole with stone or cement 

 

Concrete Post Anchor: Amazon.com

If that is free standing the anchors will jack out.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Gearclash said:

Eliminate needless words! Eliminate needless words! Eliminate needless words!

Or so said Will Strunk in his book about proper English usage.

So you're saying it

would rot 

 

  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Best pull and put new post in same hole 

If it won't pull drive a new post thru the old post. Cut it off flush and drive away. Pipe will drive the best. Be prepared to do the whole lot in the next few years.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Concrete saw.  18” square around the post.  When you get it out, drill a bigger hole than you need and pack the post in with 1” rock. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If the post is broken off flush with the concrete I have had some luck in removal by finding a BIG long lag bolt and putting it thru a piece of chain, then driving it into the old post with an impact driver. Hook the chain to the loader and try to pull out.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, zleinenbach said:

If you do this, would it be possible to bury a sleeve of some sort? 
then in theory you could remove next post and not have to fool with concrete?

Not a bad idea. I'll look into it tomorrow.

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, 1480x3 said:

The 2 or 3 times the last 40 yrs i got lucky as i was able to pull the old 6x6 with a loader and i had the new post ready to slide right back in the hole & push it down with the loader. Was fortunate to never have one bust off flush with concrete

Not sure how bad that post is yet. t'd be nice if it pulls out, but that may be wishful thinking. Will check into it tomorrow & post back.

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, zleinenbach said:

If you do this, would it be possible to bury a sleeve of some sort? 
then in theory you could remove next post and not have to fool with concrete?

A little off subject but when I built our shop I wanted 2 frost free hydrants in the floor. I  put 5 gal buckets with the bottom cut out around the hydrants filled with gravel then poured the floor . Removed the bucket then poured sackcrete(spelling?) in the hole so if the hydrants go bad I only have to break a small circle of concrete around the hydrant. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, KY2674 said:

A little off subject but when I built our shop I wanted 2 frost free hydrants in the floor. I  put 5 gal buckets with the bottom cut out around the hydrants filled with gravel then poured the floor . Removed the bucket then poured sackcrete(spelling?) in the hole so if the hydrants go bad I only have to break a small circle of concrete around the hydrant. 

They make a thing now that the hydrant comes in a casing and has some sort of pit-less adapter fitting on it, supposed to eliminate the need for digging once installed,

never used one. 
 I like your idea though tht should work nice

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Consider replacing it with something other than wood. My calf facility has been losing railroad ties for a couple years due to rot, and they finally got bad enough that I’m gonna have to replace them all if I want to use it again. (Cows went 4 years ago, but we raise a few steers for freezer meat and a hobby.) the only one that has been replaced so far was replaced with fiberglass, and the rest will be too.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...