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One way plowing video


Big Bud guy
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First of all I’m surprised this is still done in some areas of the country.  That area looks just as dry as mine and those damn things is what caused the earth to move around here.  Now I don’t know when the video was actually made but it was posted this year.

Secondly, I’ve never seen one in action but I’m amazed how straight all 5 of the one ways behind the 8850 are pulling straight.  Not because they are JD but because you think the side draft would eventually make them pull crooked 

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My very limited experience with old Minneapolis Moline was one of the most frustrating thing I ever pulled. As it wondered all over. It was a summer fallowing operation and the volunteer barley was 3 to 4 foot high and starting to head. Dad had decided the offset disc was not cutting deep enough, so he hock on the old oneway i had never seen used. With 20 inches of rain summer fallow is not needed many years.  So this late fallowing could of been just to nock over the barley and let the cows back on. In this country it is called a flat field but far from flat.

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I’ve never personally seen an 8850 or one way disc in action let alone being used together. The local dealer did have an 8850 on the lot once, the only one I’ve ever seen. They must have relatively low draft requirements as I’m guessing that must be close to 100’ wide? Very, very few tractors that big were sold new in this area. 

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Wonder how many feet of hydraulic hose there is all together?

Talk about being able to see, I am impressed! (Just like looking out over the ocean)

I also wonder why he is "one-waying" it now, as there is no weeds or other new growth sucking up moisture, as there is no moisture in the ground.

I have seen a lot of one-ways, but this is the first I have ever seen in use, and they don't even seem to be putting a load on that 8850 (350 HP John Deere V-8)

I've seen two, one came through the shop while I was at BT&I, the other was for sale down at Ballinger, TX.  (There is also supposed to be a Big Bud out in the Ballinger, Rowena, Winters area). But I have found 'dead' 8970 JD out west of Winters, fittingly enough, right across the road from the cementery.

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19 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I’ve never personally seen an 8850 or one way disc in action let alone being used together. The local dealer did have an 8850 on the lot once, the only one I’ve ever seen. They must have relatively low draft requirements as I’m guessing that must be close to 100’ wide? Very, very few tractors that big were sold new in this area. 

We had an 8850 back in the day.  My cousins still have 2 of them.  After that there was 4 more around here in my immediate neighborhood.  Only one of them is left.  They were a fairly popular tractor.  From what I gather reading the material of the day, one ways did pull easy or easier then sweep plows.  

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37 minutes ago, ray54 said:

My very limited experience with old Minneapolis Moline was one of the most frustrating thing I ever pulled. As it wondered all over. It was a summer fallowing operation and the volunteer barley was 3 to 4 foot high and starting to head. Dad had decided the offset disc was not cutting deep enough, so he hock on the old oneway i had never seen used. With 20 inches of rain summer fallow is not needed many years.  So this late fallowing could of been just to nock over the barley and let the cows back on. In this country it is called a flat field but far from flat.

We used to have an MM too from the 30s.  I assume great grandpa bought it to pull with his Twin City 21-32 later on.  

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Wow....that video brings back a lot of memories. Dad's neighbor that I used to help back in the 1980s used one-ways on wheat stubble right after harvest. He had 2 IH's hooked together....one was 17', the other was 18'....pulled them together behind a 3588 2+2. He was always adamant that you just wanted to shave the stubble with the one-way; if you were throwing dirt, you were running it too deep. The guy at the end with the 1086 was running his at the depth my neighbor would have wanted to run at. He was the last one in our area to use one-ways, said everybody tried to run them too deep and thought they did a poor job so they quit using them. 

I wished the video would have zeroed in on the tail wheels on the one-ways as the JD setup looks different than how IH set up their one-ways. On the IHs, they used a big cast iron tail wheel(think the neighbor said they were 1000-1200lbs?) that ran in the furrow behind the last disc, that tail wheel kept the one-way pulling/running straight. When you moved the one-way to another field, a hydraulic cylinder would actuate linkage back there that would lift up the cast iron wheel and then lower a rubber tire to the ground to carry the back end of the one-way.

One thing you learn quick about a one-way....they only turn one-way. My neighbor would always have us work square fields in a series of triangle-shaped lands so you always turned left. All in all, a one-way was a effective tillage tool for our neighbor. Dad never had one so it was a new experience for me.

As far as sweep plows...I assume you are talking about blade plows or Noble blades? Our neighbor had one of them, too. Five five-footers, so it was 25'. Again, the 2+2 pulled it. It definitely pulled harder than a one-way, if you could get it in the ground. Around here, its usually pretty dry at wheat harvest time, so the stubble ground can be as hard as a rock. To get the Noble blades in the ground, they usually had concrete weights on the Noble blades frames to help them penetrate the soil. Once you got the Noble blade in the ground, you didn't want to pull it out of the ground. That's why he used the 2+2...so you could turn under load at the headland. He had a 1586 as well, but that didn't work well on the Noble blade. One thing about a Noble blade, it would really loosen up the soil. If you drove into the field, you better have a 4x4 pickup, and it better be in 4wd, or you will get stuck in that soft soil. And if you did a good job with a Noble blade, you couldn't tell the field was worked with the exception of another set of wheel tracks in the field. Today's no-till stubble fields remind of a Noble-bladed field from the 80s.

The biggest Noble blade I remember was the neighbor that had a 9-blade unit....don't remember if the blade size was 5', 5 1/2', or 6' per blade as they were the common blade sizes around here. He pulled that with a Big Bud 525/50.

Thanks for the trip down memory lane. My old neighbor that I worked for passed away this spring at the ripe old age of 90. Miss that guy.

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Guy I worked for at Hunter Kansas has 7 by 7 blade and would really like to find a 9 by 7. He pulled his with a 450 Versitile and it was all it wanted. 
There are still a few one ways left in eastern Colorado. Mainly the organic guys 

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11 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

I've seen two, one came through the shop while I was at BT&I, the other was for sale down at Ballinger, TX.

Art, here is a pic of a farmall H pulling a 7 foot one-way near Ballinger, Texas in 1947. Just thought it was pretty neat you Mention Ballinger and l had this pic l found several years ago.

 

image.thumb.png.53ed91cd3d132321835f3e0e53c6dba0.png

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1 minute ago, twostepn2001 said:

Art, here is a pic of a farmall H pulling a 7 foot one-way near Ballinger, Texas in 1947. Just thought it was pretty neat you Mention Ballinger and l had this pic l found several years ago.

 

image.thumb.png.53ed91cd3d132321835f3e0e53c6dba0.png

Note the tread pattern on both of those (mismatched) rear tires.

I also wonder why the rope is wound around and knotted in several places on the hand lever.

BUT, how did YOU fathom out that the tractor is an "H"?

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2 minutes ago, Art From Coleman said:

BUT, how did YOU fathom out that the tractor is an "H"?

Just going by what's in the info from pic. ls it not a H?

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15 minutes ago, twostepn2001 said:

Just going by what's in the info from pic. ls it not a H?

No, I just did not see any thing that identified it one way or another.

For the sake of argument, I would say that it is a "M", as "tractor to driver size", it just seems bigger than an "H".

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16 hours ago, SDman said:

Wow....that video brings back a lot of memories.

 

40C1C7D1-2D3E-4E28-A0FE-DA71B1A3B477.jpeg
 

There were still a few guys that used one ways on/off in the 50s.  Most of time it was because their fallow got away on them and the one way was the only tool that could get through the weeds without plugging.  And sometimes if the previous crop was huge and there was lots of straw the one way was used the first time over.  The old 50s chisel plows didn’t have much trash clearance.  And combines didn’t have straw choppers either.  
 

The old Noble blades were a good tool back in the day when there wasn’t much for alternatives.  Our first one was old enough it was a straight blade.  Then we moved on to Model Ms with 8ft V blades in the pictures.  Started with the 3 of them behind the TD14/14A and later 5010/5020.  Then we got two more to make 5 on a hitch for 40ft.  Used that behind the 4 wheel drive.  Last time we used them was 1988.  We only used our noble blades on dry years when there was no moisture to hold the soil in place and/or there was no stubble from a poor crop.  I don’t know how the more modern Nobles worked but these old ones had limitations mainly in depth control. In our fields, the blade could be skidding on top of the ground and then 20ft later bury itself 6” deep.  Seemed like there was no in between.  Plus they created a hard pan like no other 

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7 hours ago, Lazy WP said:

Guy I worked for at Hunter Kansas has 7 by 7 blade and would really like to find a 9 by 7. He pulled his with a 450 Versitile and it was all it wanted. 
 

Blade plows are going to start making a comeback with round up resistant weeds.  Already know one guy who start using one again.

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22 hours ago, SDman said:

 

I wished the video would have zeroed in on the tail wheels on the one-ways as the JD setup looks different than how IH set up their one-ways. On the IHs, they used a big cast iron tail wheel(think the neighbor said they were 1000-1200lbs?) that ran in the furrow behind the last disc, that tail wheel kept the one-way pulling/running straight. When you moved the one-way to another field, a hydraulic cylinder would actuate linkage back there that would lift up the cast iron wheel and then lower a rubber tire to the ground to carry the back end of the one-way.

 

 

 

F8CACA94-BC72-4539-8508-72452868662B.jpeg

 

Unless I heard wrong, I thought the narrator said they were 8500s.  Here is pic out of a brochure

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A older guy who used to be the head of the ASCS office in the 80's when the CRP came out said 1-ways were fine if a fellow was to slow them down to about 3.5 MPH and sat the stubble on its edge and it did not bury so much. The reason that 1086 is so nice there is someone did not try pulling 2 of those big 1 ways behind it all its life and pull the guts out of it. We used to pull a 18 ft JD and 15' K2 behind a 1066 and it would get up and go but looking back all we were doing was making a blow pile. CRP was the best thing that ever happened for me

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15 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

 

 

F8CACA94-BC72-4539-8508-72452868662B.jpeg

 

Unless I heard wrong, I thought the narrator said they were 8500s.  Here is pic out of a brochure

I'm guessing the big stack of weights under the SMV sign worked together with the cast wheel in the furrow much like the big cast wheel worked on the neighbor's IHs...they formed an anchor in the back furrow to keep the one-way going straight. Other than this one neighbor, I've never seen a one-way in actual use out here. I know I've seen several in farmyards...parked out back as though they haven't been used in years. That picture shows what my neighbor said was the detriment of one-ways in our area....guys would pull them as deep as the spools/blades would allow. He was always a stickler that you just wanted to shave/move the stubble and nothing more. In his words, "Its not a damn moldboard plow, quit trying to use it as one". Think he also liked using the 2+2 for that job as the weight on the front end of the tractor kept it from moving around due to the side draft of the one-way. Think the main reason he used it was when you couldn't get the Noble blade into the ground if it was too dry. Also, the one-way would cut through all the field bindweed and buckwheat that we tended to have in our stubble fields at that time. With a chisel plow, you would probably just end up with a dump rake as the bindweed would plug the shanks instead of going through.

As far as Noble blades, they were pretty common in our area up through the mid-1990s or so. We have a setup like yours pictured still out at the farm. Looks like you use your collection of picked rocks for weights on the blade standards...out here most of them had concrete weights(or I have seen some with cast weights, too). The biggest problems with Noble blades here was they either wouldn't go into the ground if it was too dry or else....rocks. I don't think there's a Noble blade around that didn't need some major welding done to it at one time as the result of hitting a rock....especially if it hit the blade right at the point. At least with the setup you have where they are all individual units, they can slide sideways independently to get around a rock. With the 5 blade or bigger units, they were all attached to the same frame, so there was very little give. 

I was reminiscing the other night when I seen this post that I remember it was about this time of the year when guys that owned Noble blades would all have a blade(or more than 1) sticking up from their pickup box when you went to town. Noble blades were too wide to set down flat in a pickup box so they all had them sitting at an angle in the box with one wing of the blade sticking up in the air. 

I can remember in 1984-85 time frame, Versatile Noble introduced a Noble blade that used some kind of a hydraulic reset system that would allow the Noble blade to trip like a moldboard plow when it hit a rock. Our Versatile dealer had one that they demonstrated to numerous neighbors; they liked everything about it except the price. That was a time when times were tough in agriculture anyway, so nobody was buying "wants", only "needs". Don't ever remember any of them being sold around here.

Our IH dealer was a dealer for Richardson blade plows at the time. The Versatile dealer sold Noble. I can remember the Flex-King brand being popular here as well.

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Is there anyone still making these?  Like some specialized manufacturer?  

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...I am sure this HD6 was  pulling a one way disc plough..(??)....down under......anyway, you don't see many HD6's as dedicated    Agricultural tractors....

...quite a while back

Mike

IMG_2138.JPG

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