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Couple of old pictures, of interest........"Red " related !!......more pictures added...and more again


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I think it's Mexico, Mike. Not sure what kind of Gov't they have but probably similar to yours and mine.....😠

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We had one running a generator in a plant and you're never far from ear protection, there was a Terex dump truck at the coal mine idling yesterday and it sounded like bigger DD power ♥️

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Saw this today at a tractor mechanic's. Looks like a TD9 size. Its a 6 cylinder. Probably loaded its last bucket, sadly. Thought you guys might like to see it. He also had some kind of small industrial loader tractor with a Detroit in it. I looked it all over and couldn't tell who the manufacturer was. It almost looked Deere-ish. Probably late 50s or 60s vintage. Unfortunately didn't get a picture of it.

20240329_105554.thumb.jpg.ad9ee7893b8a1e7961839aa372a84b28.jpg

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23 hours ago, TN Hillbilly said:

Saw this today at a tractor mechanic's. Looks like a TD9 size. Its a 6 cylinder. Probably loaded its last bucket, sadly. Thought you guys might like to see it. He also had some kind of small industrial loader tractor with a Detroit in it. I looked it all over and couldn't tell who the manufacturer was. It almost looked Deere-ish. Probably late 50s or 60s vintage. Unfortunately didn't get a picture of it.

20240329_105554.thumb.jpg.ad9ee7893b8a1e7961839aa372a84b28.jpg

The Deere Industrial 440 wheel tractor was available with a Detroit. 
 

440 Tractor Data

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I had a TD9-92 series with a Drott  loader. I loaded a lot of gravel with it. It had the 4 in 1 bucket, but really never used it much for that type of work. A little loading stumps or logs once in a while.

DWF

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On 3/31/2024 at 9:15 PM, DWF said:

I had a TD9-92 series with a Drott  loader. I loaded a lot of gravel with it. It had the 4 in 1 bucket, but really never used it much for that type of work. A little loading stumps or logs once in a while.

DWF

The 4 in 1 makes quick work of the dump into the truck,  no bucket curl needed and  less height.

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On 3/29/2024 at 1:14 PM, TN Hillbilly said:

Saw this today at a tractor mechanic's. Looks like a TD9 size. Its a 6 cylinder. Probably loaded its last bucket, sadly. Thought you guys might like to see it. He also had some kind of small industrial loader tractor with a Detroit in it. I looked it all over and couldn't tell who the manufacturer was. It almost looked Deere-ish. Probably late 50s or 60s vintage. Unfortunately didn't get a picture of it.

20240329_105554.thumb.jpg.ad9ee7893b8a1e7961839aa372a84b28.jpg

It has a winch on it too

 

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17 hours ago, just Dave said:

The 4 in 1 makes quick work of the dump into the truck,  no bucket curl needed and  less height.

I used it a little like that, but you still need to curl the bucket to push the gravel to the opposite side. Good to hear from someone who knows how to properly load gravel etc.

DWF

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  • 3 weeks later...
47 minutes ago, TN Hillbilly said:

Now THAT is a twin stack Mack with a shack in the back!

A buddy of mine ran one like that in the 80's with Cummins and a Mack 12 hauling Tomatos out of Florida to Boston

Replaced it with a  KW T600 with a CAT and a 13 it was such a advance in comfort he only bought KWs after that 

 

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Link-Belt K-370 cable shovel loads out shot rock from this deep ledge cut & loads out the material onto International PH-65 "Payhauler" end dumps on const. of the Kancamagus Highway (Rte. 112) in Lincoln, NH. Aug. 1959.

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Here is an other long log photo

1908 Logs brought in from Washington State to the Maine shipyards

 By this time Maine large timber had been pretty much been depleted  

 

Description from the Historian

In his book about BIW, Ralph Linwood Snow said it took 6 months to get spar length logs from Washington State to Maine due to logistics of the log lengths. Once they made it to Bath’s north end they were rolled into the river and floated down to whichever shipyard ordered them. Then they were hauled out for the spar makers to begin their arduous task of producing ship spars.

The sticks in this photo were 121 feet long, with diameters ranging from 30 to 32 inches. The Bath Enterprise reported that the trip across the continent had taken 30 days, and that the total load was 130 tons (not sure if that is for all the spars in the order, or for each set of five). The spars had been ordered by the Bath ship timber firm of Morse Brothers. Some of them became the lower masts for the six-mast schooner Edward B. Winslow, launched at the Percy & Small yard in December of that year. This photo was taken by Bath photographer in the last week of April 1908 for a local newspaper.

image.png.bb208178e9591131527fe3718da6cc32.png

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15 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

Here is an other long log photo

1908 Logs brought in from Washington State to the Maine shipyards

 By this time Maine large timber had been pretty much been depleted  

 

Description from the Historian

In his book about BIW, Ralph Linwood Snow said it took 6 months to get spar length logs from Washington State to Maine due to logistics of the log lengths. Once they made it to Bath’s north end they were rolled into the river and floated down to whichever shipyard ordered them. Then they were hauled out for the spar makers to begin their arduous task of producing ship spars.

The sticks in this photo were 121 feet long, with diameters ranging from 30 to 32 inches. The Bath Enterprise reported that the trip across the continent had taken 30 days, and that the total load was 130 tons (not sure if that is for all the spars in the order, or for each set of five). The spars had been ordered by the Bath ship timber firm of Morse Brothers. Some of them became the lower masts for the six-mast schooner Edward B. Winslow, launched at the Percy & Small yard in December of that year. This photo was taken by Bath photographer in the last week of April 1908 for a local newspaper.

image.png.bb208178e9591131527fe3718da6cc32.png

Douglas Fir?

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