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Flushing a drilled well out with dry ice


vtfireman85
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I’ve heard of this, never seen it done or tried it. Ours is shallower than the neighbors around and we have a limited capacity. I am tempted to try it, apparently it is supposed to create a geyser to rival old Faithful and in so doing clear out sediment and  some of the fissures. Ours was done with a pounder, apparently water was more than plentiful for 5-10 years and diminishing as time goes by. 
any experience? 

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My FIL has issues with iron plugging the screen at the bottom of drilled well. About every 10 years, he pulls the pump, dump some kind of acid down the well, waits a little bit and then drops hose from gas powered trailer mounted air compressor and turns the valve on. He usially has a 20' red geyser come out of the well, a couple times and it usually cleans the screen. Cant see why the air compresssot won't work for you. 

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6 minutes ago, jeeper61 said:

I think you need to put a packer in the casing to allow pressure to build 

You mean with the dry ice? I watched a video where they were trying like **** to get the cover bolted back on. It went flying and one guy was holding his arm. One of those cast covers free range would be a bad thing. 

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11 minutes ago, JaredT said:

My FIL has issues with iron plugging the screen at the bottom of drilled well. About every 10 years, he pulls the pump, dump some kind of acid down the well, waits a little bit and then drops hose from gas powered trailer mounted air compressor and turns the valve on. He usially has a 20' red geyser come out of the well, a couple times and it usually cleans the screen. Cant see why the air compresssot won't work for you. 

The air compressor i have access too, that might be a possibility. 

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We have had a bit of experience with using a compressor.  I was fortunate to know a driller who was an expert to drillers for tips..  The one we learned on was drilled in 1955, is about 500 feet deep, using 5 inch steel casing.  For that you need a big compressor.  We used 2 inch blue stripe poly pipe with a steel pipe insert in the end as that is better if you have to stir things down the hole.  Advice was definitely do not blow air till the poly gets hot because if you get a "Z" down the hole that is it.

Start the blow at the top of the water and work down.  Then pull the poly, drill extra air holes aimed up at the top of the steel and do it again.

Peak nervous as I started feeding the pipe down but it all worked.  Best other advice was from a local who had also done one.  We had to hold the poly down and his comment was "Be prepared for the biggest shower you've ever had".  

The reason we gave it a try in the first one - the pump was down about 350 feet and had jammed with mud.  So had it come up from the bottom?  We got to bottom and only blew a minor amount of rubbish out so it wasn't that.  Next suspect was a hole in the outer casing around where we were pumping - possible as we had mud problems again a couple of years later.

The boys have just had a bore pro in.  They used smaller poly which might have been 1 1/4" thick wall and just went straight to the bottom, roped the poly and started blowing. They  ran a camera down both the holes before they blew them.

We had cleaned the older one out with a sand pump on a cable about 1995 and must have done a good job, as you could see the white sandstone at the bottom.  And the casing (1949) was very good. They blew it with negligible sand etc.

The one we did was drilled in 1955, casing still OK but not as good as the older one and again negligible sand etc.  That one will likely go solar now.

That is a summary of why we did it and what we did.

 

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I have two wells that mineral deposit it up and can keep the poppet from sealing when chunks break loose.

Every fall when I shut the them off for the winter, I dump a couple gallons of Clorox down each well.

It has seemed to help.

 

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Well I also heard the shooting a 30-06 down them will help.  And I have know people who did it.

 

if you do it I want video

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24 minutes ago, AKwelder said:

Well I also heard the shooting a 30-06 down them will help.  And I have know people who did it.

 

if you do it I want video

Did a sand point with the AR-15.

Got real wet.

 

Water come up faster than a gas station burrito after seven shots of tequila 🤣

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4 hours ago, sandhiller said:

I have two wells that mineral deposit it up and can keep the poppet from sealing when chunks break loose.

Every fall when I shut the them off for the winter, I dump a couple gallons of Clorox down each well.

It has seemed to help.

 

Here is the science behind what you are doing. Clorox is liquid chlorine it can be bought in higher strength solutions from water treatment suppliers. It also has an expiration date in the jugs. Most bleach sold or used is well passed the use by date

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2 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

I had my well hydro-fractured have not had a problem since at the time it was $1800

Here is a link to web page of the guy who did mine it explains the process 

https://www.precisionwell.com/hydrofacturing.html

I wonder how much resistance he gets, from using the word "fracturing", given the negative connotations the MEDIA has saddled that word with?

He does a good job of describing the process.

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13 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

 

Wow! That's impressive! The amount of sediment followed by foam is astonishing.

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11 minutes ago, 12_Guy said:

If it is bacterial iron, chlorine bleach will kill it. Bacterial iron is a slimy, rust red colored sludge buildup. 

Sounds like what I am dealing with.

On another note (maybe)

The one well has a nasty rotten egg/sulfer smell to it.

I thought it odd, you can't taste it if you pinch your nose shut.

Only well like it on the place.

Every other well has the best tasting drinking water in the world.

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I remember helping a local dairy farm that had issues with the bacterial iron. It was plugging up faucet aerators in the house and later water fountains for the cattle. It would get so bad that it would reduce the flow in his pipes. We shocked the well with about 3 gallons of bleach followed by a few 5 gallon buckets of water to help mix it in the well. We then ran every faucet, fountain and hydrant until we could smell the chlorine. Let it set for a few hours and then flushed it all out. The water ran like blood for a good while and then cleared up. At times it was thick, almost like ketchup. We probably ran hundreds of gallons of water out of his hydrants. I was honestly thinking it may never clear up but it did. Then we flushed out all of the smaller faucets, toilets etc. It was quite a mess. The problem with this stuff is that it will come back. We did this shock treatment twice and then he has been treating the well ever since without any issues. I don’t know the exact maintenance treatment. He played with amount and frequency to try to limit the smell and still keep the bacteria at bay. I think it was around a cup once a week. 

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16 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

I’ve heard of this, never seen it done or tried it. Ours is shallower than the neighbors around and we have a limited capacity. I am tempted to try it, apparently it is supposed to create a geyser to rival old Faithful and in so doing clear out sediment and  some of the fissures. Ours was done with a pounder, apparently water was more than plentiful for 5-10 years and diminishing as time goes by. 
any experience? 

Boss man talked about it. Said they needed three guys to put the cap back on the well! One sitting on it, the others trying to tighten it down.

Just drop a stick of dy-no-mite down it…🤪🤕

Have you called anyone to frack it?  That’s what I did, made quite a difference for me. 

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16 hours ago, AKwelder said:

Well I also heard the shooting a 30-06 down them will help.  And I have know people who did it.

 

if you do it I want video

If it's drinking water, don't use lead

Or depleted uranium.

Use steel, but definitely do it

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4 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

a local dairy farm that had issues with the bacterial iron.

 

4 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

I don’t know the exact maintenance treatment.

The guy who  hydro-fractured  my well said to treat it annually with chorine tablets said that is easier on the casing and pump and wiring than the liquid 

 

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3 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

 

The guy who  hydro-fractured  my well said to treat it annually with chorine tablets said that is easier on the casing and pump and wiring than the liquid 

 

I don't know what is better. We installed one automatic pellet metering system. The pellets swelled up from moisture/humidity and plugged up the feed tube and meter plate. This thing was similar to a plate type corn planter unit that was driven by a gearmotor. It also left a salt like residue at the waterline in the well.

We always diluted the bleach in a bucket of water and followed it with a bucket of clear water to wash it down. Not sure which is better. Both have issues/headaches. 

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I was thinking a good explosion was in order, as I have heard talk of that in irrigation wells in the old days. 

Was surprised at how much is blown out by the dry ice. 

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