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4386 - Why does the replacment turbo not fit?? Advice needed, 2SE Borg Warner 167336


BigTom209
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4 minutes ago, RAH said:

When we put 3lm on ours, we had to grid/ cut to fit. Had the same exact problem you have. Was literally just taking little off at a time till was able to put boot on. That 1/4-3/8 number sounds correct. Hope this is helpful. 

That does make me feel better, knowing someone that for sure had to trim theirs to fit. I just fully expected to drop in and go, not having to modify things to fit. 

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I think somebody already mentioned triming some off both the turbo and the intake. An 1/8 off each wouldn't be a big deal I wouldn't think. Only thing that would concern me would be getting grindings into turbo and causing damage accidently.  If it were not for that i myself would prefer to trim  the turbo more so than an ih no longer available piece. In the end it all works out the same sounds like, trim to fit.

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2 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

I personally would not take any off the turbo. Modify the relatively inexpensive, easy to replace part.

 

That was my thoughts as well, plus if I can take the material off the intake manifold it's only 3 bolts holding it on and can take it to the shop to cut/grind, so practically no risk of metal flying around and getting into someplace it shouldn't be. 

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Mayhap you should check the price & availability of the "cheap and replaceable" part first?  The DTI were not nearly as common as the DT, and turbos are relatively easy to come by (except today).    If the intake fitting is available and cheap, I agree.   It also could be one of those "NLA- $1200 if found used" little parts, like the brake calipers for the 4386!

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5 hours ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

Mayhap you should check the price & availability of the "cheap and replaceable" part first?  The DTI were not nearly as common as the DT, and turbos are relatively easy to come by (except today).    If the intake fitting is available and cheap, I agree.   It also could be one of those "NLA- $1200 if found used" little parts, like the brake calipers for the 4386!

My thoughts also. I'd cut all from the turbo, the intake manifold is probably harder to find but usually would not go bad like a turbo will 

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So if you were to replace the turbo and the manifold is there a way to avoid this problem? I want to replace my manifold as well 

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2 hours ago, ChrisNY said:

So if you were to replace the turbo and the manifold is there a way to avoid this problem? I want to replace my manifold as well 

Spacer on the turbo might be a possibility? 

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12 hours ago, BigTom209 said:

 

That was my thoughts as well, plus if I can take the material off the intake manifold it's only 3 bolts holding it on and can take it to the shop to cut/grind, so practically no risk of metal flying around and getting into someplace it shouldn't be. 

You can take the compressor housing off the turbo also. Just remove the 6 bolt and it slides off 

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14 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

I personally would not take any off the turbo. Modify the relatively inexpensive, easy to replace part.

I'd do the exact opposite and start trimming the turbo. 1 it's aluminum and easily welded. 2 it's a newly made part, which means a replacement is available,  that factory intercooler intake is pushing 50, and NLA.....

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17 hours ago, ChrisNY said:

So if you were to replace the turbo and the manifold is there a way to avoid this problem? I want to replace my manifold as well 

If you were to make a "spacer plate" 3/8 thick that went between the head and the manifold, that would fix this issue.    However, it would mean you would need that plate milled very flat so that the gaskets sealed properly, there would be more chance of the manifold leaking, you would need longer studs, it might change the flow characteristics (probably only important on high reving gas engines), you might need to bend the turbo oil lines, the hole in the hood may need to be trimmed out, etc.       Seems simplier to just trim the turbo & intake a bit.

Maybe somebody already makes space blocks that would fit the exhaust ports.   No idea where you would find them though.

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On 7/29/2022 at 6:27 AM, Matt Kirsch said:

Never thought of this before but just did a google search on the turbo in question. This is what I came up with.

It is listed for a post-1993 DTA466. A standing for "aftercooled" I'd imagine? No wonder she don't quite fit...

https://www.mddistributorsstore.com/borg-warner-turbo-systems/167336/new-turbocharger

There’s dozens of website showing the part number 167336 being an interchange for the 4386 international tractor, and a slew of other tractors and combines and different turbos. Spec wise I’m sure it’s correct, I just assumed it’d be a direct bolt on 

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Ended up trimming the intake, 3 bolts it came off so easy peasy to work on it in the shop. Of course the old seal tore so made a new one

First crack I cut the “bulge” the hose goes over basically in 1/2, didn’t work. So ground it down and basically eliminated the bulge, it was “close” and probably would’ve worked but still basically touching, so took a bit more off and everything lined up quite well. 
 

anyone doing this remember it’s aluminum and don’t use a bench grinder/stone, use a sander. Angle grinder with a sanding flap disc worked good, could go nice and slow. Work outside if you can makes lots of aluminum dust, bad stuff to breathe. 

 

Everything else lined up easy peasy once that was done. So I kept filling it with clean new oil over and over and spinning it by hand while I was working, then just to make sure the oil was pumping I put a bucket underneath the feed line and had someone wind over the motor, I was surprised took about 15 seconds before a solid steady stream started coming out. 
 

my operators manual did say though if the tractor was left sitting for a long period of time to wind it over until oil pressure built up, and it could take up to 30 seconds if I remember right so guessing it’s normal. 
 

either way, got it together, cranked the motor for awhile to make sure oil was there, lifted the throttle and it fired right up. Let it sit idling for tens of minutes while I put away tools and cleaned up, put the panels back together, felt for any leaks everything seemed tight and good, could hear a bit of a turbo whine so good sign. 
 

drove around the yard a bit still basically idling along… didn’t really see the new boost gauge move much but never got really above 1400 so won’t pass judgement on it just yet. Could definitely feel a light breeze from the hose while it was idling

 

so yeah. Now I just need to wait until we do some fall work and I can put it to use and see how things feel! Really hoping everything does well

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  • 3 months later...

Sorry to bring this up from the dead, but I always like to finish off the story for anyone in the future who comes across this post

So, new turbo is in, boost gauge and EGT all of it for the first time, I hook up to our 70' heavy harrow which is likely a bit much for the tractor but I don't have it set aggressively more of a hard tickle being I'm just moving straw around after combining. Anyway make sure it's nice and warmed up, get moving and put it in the ground and zero issues! Seems happy as a clam pulling that harrow around. The new digital EGT and water gauges I installed are really nice and I find I'm watching them all the time bombing around. EGT temps on normal flat'ish land was sitting between  930-980F the entire time, temp gauge 180-190F, boost gauge was around 10PSI (not sure how much I trust the gauge though) but still it was nice! Everything ran just sweet, pulled really nice, wasn't lugging at all. RPM was set for right around 2550-2600RPM. There was a couple times I had to pull the harrow up a bit of a hill and the highest I ever saw the EGT get to was 1050F and the boost was up around 14PSI, RPMs dropped a little bit down to 2400+ but it just chugged up the hill and kept going. I put on about 30 hours harrowing and zero issues

 

Really would've been nice to have all these gauges working with the OEM stock turbo, I know this one is supposed to produce less exhaust temps but I'm impressed it's staying below 1000F most the time on a warm fall day. I think the operators manual for my elevation normal temp should be 1150+ or something like that? So it seems quite a bit cooler versus OEM, and plenty of power.

 

So thanks again to everyone that helped with this and all the thoughts and ideas, the old 4386 is back in the rotation!

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