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2004 GMC pickup frame rust - what to do.


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That seems strange to me, we have a 93, K2500 Suburban. Basically no rust except some surface rust on the chassis rails and on the hot rolled steel I used for front towbar mounting.  I am the third owner of the K2500, it came to Texas in 2015 via, Wyoming, Utah and Southern Ca, currently at 226,000 miles. Only things original  is the 10.5" FF rear end and the transfer case, does not appear to have ever been beat-up  off-road.

Good luck with your machine.

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2 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

On the same note, since the frame rot, IS the fault of the road salt used by the state, they should be responsible for at least some of the repair/replacement cost of making the vehicle road worthy again.  

No disrespect, but this is a slippery slope... what would free the state of all liability... no salt? Who should share the cost of the increased accidents or loss of life? Why does GM get off scott free, they’re the ones who designed the frames to fill up with salty dirt and promote corrosion. The same goes for the powder coaters. Powder coated chassis parts is the worst idea ever. One little nick and the rust lifts it right off, but it never breaks up and goes away. The part is always submerged in salt water until there’s nothing left but a piece of plastic shell... like a locust that shed it’s skin. That sad truth is that if you want a nice vehicle in the salt belt, it takes effort. Either have to trade it off before it gets bad, or get it on the lift and oil the daylights out of the underbody, yearly at least. One-time undercoating is more or less a farce; in Ohio a 20 year old truck has only the frame rails and the Ziebart sticker remaining.

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1 hour ago, oleman said:

That seems strange to me, we have a 93, K2500 Suburban. Basically no rust except some surface rust on the chassis rails and on the hot rolled steel I used for front towbar mounting.  I am the third owner of the K2500, it came to Texas in 2015 via, Wyoming, Utah and Southern Ca, currently at 226,000 miles. Only things original  is the 10.5" FF rear end and the transfer case, does not appear to have ever been beat-up  off-road.

Good luck with your machine.

  Two words for you.  Road.....salt.

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1 hour ago, Binderoid said:

No disrespect, but this is a slippery slope... what would free the state of all liability... no salt? Who should share the cost of the increased accidents or loss of life? Why does GM get off scott free, they’re the ones who designed the frames to fill up with salty dirt and promote corrosion. The same goes for the powder coaters. Powder coated chassis parts is the worst idea ever. One little nick and the rust lifts it right off, but it never breaks up and goes away. The part is always submerged in salt water until there’s nothing left but a piece of plastic shell... like a locust that shed it’s skin. That sad truth is that if you want a nice vehicle in the salt belt, it takes effort. Either have to trade it off before it gets bad, or get it on the lift and oil the daylights out of the underbody, yearly at least. One-time undercoating is more or less a farce; in Ohio a 20 year old truck has only the frame rails and the Ziebart sticker remaining.

  Mid-1970's PU is easy to catch all the surface to oil or otherwise coat.  2006 Silverado such as what I have too many nooks and recesses to hope to coat every vulnerable spot.  

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The best solution is to move to the south!

The 84 dodge i recently purchased is rest free and still has the cheap paint on the frame.

Thx-Ace 

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56 minutes ago, acem said:

The best solution is to move to the south!

Good quote from Ace.

I left MN about 10 yrs ago for KS... it was heartbreaking watching so many cool vehicles succumb to salt.

 

As for the Colorado: everything is fixable... it just depends how much you're willing to spend. (you could also argue if it makes sense, I won't discuss that)

For a high mile Colorado you may be better off selling it for the body.  I say that having wrenched on many rust buckets... it was rarely (never) worth it.

All the best, Andy

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2 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  Mid-1970's PU is easy to catch all the surface to oil or otherwise coat.  2006 Silverado such as what I have too many nooks and recesses to hope to coat every vulnerable spot.  

the body on my 2000 Silverado is still very nice orig paint 

up here we have Krown Rust Protection and Rust Check, they both give lifetime warranty on body if done since new and yearly afterwards. There is no problem doing those trucks with the right equipment and training

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Know where to buy the rust free vehicles and be willing to travel.

It will be money well spent!

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There is no salt spray in Arkansas.

Salt spray from the ocean only effects areas immediately along the coast and it nothing like the rust belt. 

Now the vehicles that routinely drive on the beach do rust out. You don't want an old city truck from a beach town!

Thx

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The problem with repairing the frame is finding good metal to weld to. Jeeps are kind of an exception as they have a known salt trap but good metal not to far away and kits to repair are available. Sadly, frame rot often means the next trip is to the junk yard.

Check out just rolled in on YouTube for some scary rot from no safety inspection states.

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Very high mileage vehicles can be found in this area with good bodies very cheap for their model year. BUT the vehicles will have wear everywhere seatbelts and door parts, all moving parts especially drivers door hinges. Cracks in chassis and other attaching points, moving parts. Only thing in good shape is the sheetmetal unless it was (hailed) wrecked and the plastics. If you magna-flux the chassis for cracks and they are not out of kilter they could be good.  Old vehicles with low mileage are very rare because Texas is a large state and people drive everywhere.

No such thing as a free lunch, spend your resources and take your chances.  BUT IMO haphazard chassis repairs could lead a driver to boot hill.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

first off sorry for the hijack but your topic is woundup

 This morning my truck developed a "sheared  " frame. clean break in nice metal maybe 2 inch tear

 We were almost pulling into a little place that sells appliances  when a little car was in our lane headed straight for us. I swerved off the road onto the gravel parking lot but it was like he was chasing us. I thought in the split second  I had avoided him until we were spun around and knocked back 40 or 50 feet by a tiny little car. We were probably doing 5-10 mph

frameass.jpg

frame.jpg

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28 minutes ago, hillman said:

first off sorry for the hijack but your topic is woundup

 This morning my truck developed a "sheared  " frame. clean break in nice metal maybe 2 inch tear

 We were almost pulling into a little place that sells appliances  when a little car was in our lane headed straight for us. I swerved off the road onto the gravel parking lot but it was like he was chasing us. I thought in the split second  I had avoided him until we were spun around and knocked back 40 or 50 feet by a tiny little car. We were probably doing 5-10 mph

frameass.jpg

frame.jpg

Yikes.  Everyone ok I guess?  A little farther forward and I could see some serious injuries. 

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thanks for asking guys

I had a sore neck but we both will be sore tomorrow I expect. It knocked my hat off , I had a set of sockets under the seat on a rail and they came off etc. The guy was looking down and made no attempt to apply his brakes. NO SKID MARKS. My poor dog was shaking like a leaf and barked at everyone there, he is my best buddy and he sure was upset

 just goes to show how fast your life can change or end in a split second. 

 I look after my vehicles and wanted a few more years out of that one ( it was in really nice shape ) and through no fault of mine I am entering the inflated market of used trucks. At least my wife and dog are OK. ....my best 2 friends

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5 minutes ago, hillman said:

thanks for asking guys

I had a sore neck but we both will be sore tomorrow I expect. It knocked my hat off , I had a set of sockets under the seat on a rail and they came off etc. The guy was looking down and made no attempt to apply his brakes. NO SKID MARKS. My poor dog was shaking like a leaf and barked at everyone there, he is my best buddy and he sure was upset

 just goes to show how fast your life can change or end in a split second. 

 I look after my vehicles and wanted a few more years out of that one ( it was in really nice shape ) and through no fault of mine I am entering the inflated market of used trucks. At least my wife and dog are OK. ....my best 2 friends

Iron can be replaced, family, not so much. 

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I have repaired a few Colorados in that very area. You can probably fix it, but plan on plating it farther than you expect. Give it a very good going over before starting. Hit it with a chipping hammer everywhere and plan on plating everywhere it goes through. More than 3 separate areas, junk it. Getting fasteners off will be a bear. I live in NE Pennsylvania, so I feel your rust pain. I would like to see us go to no salt, cinders or crushed stone for traction. So things slow down for a day or two. Life is too fast anyway.

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