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Small Sawmills


acem
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 Ace...couple of things for your consideration......

...you will now be realising you just cannot face life....without a sawmill...like a fine blued steel and oiled wood firearm ..or a Ford pickup  etc...  this purchase for you is a necessity.....

I do like the band saw mills ...but down under they are very expensive...and if one is lucky enough to have some sort of ''woodlot''...a ''wood miser''  type mill is perhaps not justified...in other words you can toss a bit more of your own product into the firewood bin....as apposed  to buying in saw logs

I have had an earlier  style , New Zealand made mill ..pictured ...Its great virtue was , if you had a huge log ...up to 8 feet in diameter, the mill could be set up over the log and  away you go....On most rural properties , there would not be a machine capable of lifting that diameter log ...of  around 17 foot length...so that type of mill was just the thing for peeling out good timber from  such trees...which we have in abundance ...(or used to...)    down under...

...but because we have a considerable  area of Douglas  Fir , on our place , I have a more conventional , double saw, mill.powered by a four cylinder Perkins diesel engine....which is really good  set up...Again , we brought it "second hand '..but that saved   $60K NZ...and really...they are simple enough to set up and maintain   to cut  good clean timber   BTW,I mention   17 feet because of the normal 8  foot stud size we use down under...it will cut longer that, but  nothing like @Dave Shepard  set up... Maybe he cuts decking for Aircraft Carriers ..or similar......:mellow:

The current mill will cut a 12 inch by 8   inch , no problem...but beyond that is  a trick...however, its not often one uses that size timber....

The pics are not about the mill..in the first two..but you can get the idea...third pic is all about safety on the site.:rolleyes:.note the bloke on the bucket.....  last two  are the current mill

Mike

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Didn't buy the sawmill. I didn't like how it was built, had problems and brought within $1000 of what I can buy a new one for. It needed alot of work to cut logs again.

But I bought a truck. 85? Dodge 150 4x4 360 auto. One owner, pretty tight but... won't start and ugly paint. Somebody tried to fix something and has messed up the wiring under the hood. I have good wiring from a parts truck. He repainted it himself but it looks like he used flat house paint... at least it's keeping the surface rust away. It's a local rust free truck I've been around for decades.

It should work out for a good truck.

Sorry but I'm a dodge guy @mike newman

20220611_180854.jpg

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1 hour ago, acem said:

Didn't buy the sawmill. I didn't like how it was built, had problems and brought within $1000 of what I can buy a new one for. It needed alot of work to cut logs again.

But I bought a truck. 85? Dodge 150 4x4 360 auto. One owner, pretty tight but... won't start and ugly paint. Somebody tried to fix something and has messed up the wiring under the hood. I have good wiring from a parts truck. He repainted it himself but it looks like he used flat house paint... at least it's keeping the surface rust away. It's a local rust free truck I've been around for decades.

It should work out for a good truck.

Sorry but I'm a dodge guy @mike newman

20220611_180854.jpg

Burned out ammeter on the Dodge?

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13 hours ago, acem said:

@mike newman I've been around a lot of mills here in the states but never seen anything like those. 

Can you please explain how they work and show us more pics?

Thx-Ace 

Ace...the current mill ...second lot of pictures, travels across  east  /west.....on the runners....You see those logs with the slab wood on them...they are the 'skid'' logs...so the proceedure for milling is to start with the mill ''head '   comprising motor  /saws /  hydralic pump   hose etc/ winch   and water hoses...way out on the far side as you see those pictures....

The logs to cut are loaded on the skid logs.....either  one...or if there is a lot of milling to do...depending on the diameter  of the logs...up to four or five logs...They are lined up square as possible to the main saw carriage way...and chocked with wooden wedges.... The saw   'head'' is controled by a hydralic winch , of variable speed...(I shoud say  at this point....the saw ''carriage '' has been leveled , hydralically...the whole contraption sits on four posts...and the head is  raised...or lowered by hydralic rams at the corner posts....all the skid logs have been leveled  by running the saw across each  log...  this via the 'head ' which travels  about 22  feet  down the '''cutting carriage''...then you incrementally  shift it '''west / east ''... about four or five inches    and run the saw down the carriage   and thus work your way across the ''skid logs''  so they are all dead level......)

Once the mill logs are ready to cut ...say   4x 2  inch  timber...the saw head and carriage is   raised ...hydralically, via those four vertical rams...lock in position...and you systematically start   working across   those  four or five logs,  on the skids....Obviously  the slab wood comes off  the top   of each one   as you work across...then after a few cuts to get a little width in the top part of the log....off comes the  4x2's...

In the lower picture  , you can clearly see the "'East / west " track....in the upper picture  you see the ''head ''  sitting on the main carriage way....that variable speed hyd. winch  pulls it back and forth, along the track, via a very small diameter   woven steel rope   (wire rope )....with a pully way down the far end, for the rope to run around...

Helluva involved explanation...next time I am back home , I can get some better pics ..if you like... We wil talk about the mill  in the top two pics later  ...:)

Mike

Oh, BTW  Ace...the best looking American 'pickup '  ever ,were the 1993/4    Dodge's...without doubt , in my book...as for the old blue 4x4...I would swap that in a heart beat for my two pickups.....

.....if you are interested....

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14 hours ago, yellowrosefarm said:

Burned out ammeter on the Dodge?

I don't think so. It has the lean burn style ignition carburetor controller system. They replaced the carburetor but not the ignition and it didn't work right. They tried to modify the wiring but failed. Ray had alzheimer's pretty bad by then. It hasn't run since, about a year ago. I just need to convert it to std chrysler electronic ignition and it should be good. Everything else is supposed to work. It's an 84 model, not an 85.

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10 hours ago, mike newman said:

Ace...the current mill ...second lot of pictures, travels across  east  /west.....on the runners....You see those logs with the slab wood on them...they are the 'skid'' logs...so the proceedure for milling is to start with the mill ''head '   comprising motor  /saws /  hydralic pump   hose etc/ winch   and water hoses...way out on the far side as you see those pictures....

The logs to cut are loaded on the skid logs.....either  one...or if there is a lot of milling to do...depending on the diameter  of the logs...up to four or five logs...They are lined up square as possible to the main saw carriage way...and chocked with wooden wedges.... The saw   'head'' is controled by a hydralic winch , of variable speed...(I shoud say  at this point....the saw ''carriage '' has been leveled , hydralically...the whole contraption sits on four posts...and the head is  raised...or lowered by hydralic rams at the corner posts....all the skid logs have been leveled  by running the saw across each  log...  this via the 'head ' which travels  about 22  feet  down the '''cutting carriage''...then you incrementally  shift it '''west / east ''... about four or five inches    and run the saw down the carriage   and thus work your way across the ''skid logs''  so they are all dead level......)

Once the mill logs are ready to cut ...say   4x 2  inch  timber...the saw head and carriage is   raised ...hydralically, via those four vertical rams...lock in position...and you systematically start   working across   those  four or five logs,  on the skids....Obviously  the slab wood comes off  the top   of each one   as you work across...then after a few cuts to get a little width in the top part of the log....off comes the  4x2's...

In the lower picture  , you can clearly see the "'East / west " track....in the upper picture  you see the ''head ''  sitting on the main carriage way....that variable speed hyd. winch  pulls it back and forth, along the track, via a very small diameter   woven steel rope   (wire rope )....with a pully way down the far end, for the rope to run around...

Helluva involved explanation...next time I am back home , I can get some better pics ..if you like... We wil talk about the mill  in the top two pics later  ...:)

Mike

Oh, BTW  Ace...the best looking American 'pickup '  ever ,were the 1993/4    Dodge's...without doubt , in my book...as for the old blue 4x4...I would swap that in a heart beat for my two pickups.....

.....if you are interested....

I have a 78 ford f300 I'd sell you reasonable. 80,000 miles. An old fire truck. Pretty tight. Shipping might be high right now.

I look forward to more pics and information about the mills. I like sawmills of various types.

I plan to cut a few logs soon and try out my brother in laws mill and see how I like it. I'll probably order their 26"  model. The woodland mills hm126.

 

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Lucas sells those swing mills up here Mike.  I think they are made down your way somewhere.  They are the only ones I know of.  The main problem I see with them is the limited depth of cut.  I don't see how you could make 10 or 12 inch wide boards which are common in the States with them, but I might be wrong.

 

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1 hour ago, Rawleigh99 said:

Lucas sells those swing mills up here Mike.  I think they are made down your way somewhere.  They are the only ones I know of.

 

Yep...very similar  to the ""Rimu"  mill in those  pictures in the above posts....except the pictures were not ''mill specific''    Both the Lucas    and Rimu could be pushed ..using man power...or ...had an automated   option   that powered the saws through the log... For a fit strong regular bloke, the Rimu was easy to push through logs....even cutting quite bg timber..like the shed roof favourite...8x2's...

The game breaker, Rawleigh, of those two particular mills ..simply was the cost....Don't know about todays  price...(gasp )...but  a decade   ago, the cost was around $15 K   (NZ )...which was waaaaay   under, for example , the new price of the (my)  current mill shown in the pictures...and, for the small bloke...you could produce a lot of timber on a daily basis....and cut a log  up to six or seven feet in diameter..possibly more...because the mill could be ''set up''   over said log....

Somewhere, I have a picture of an Allis 745  loader, which had a huge log , about 20 feet long ..in its logging forks...however, the loader just stood up on its front legs....so   we lashed a TD6, off the drawbar....  to the back of the Allis....that kept the loader on all its feet...thus the log was shifted  to a siutable milling spot...with the   TD following on behind..backing , of course...and the partially pictured  'Rimu' mill in an earlier post....duly processed it into timber of various  sizes....

Bit of an act pushing the mill over a log of that stature....easyest   way is to hop up onto the log...and push the mill from that point

,if  @acem happens to read this...one feature of the ''Mahoe "  mill    that is pictured above, somewhere...is that when a   board is cut with  that mill it features a  smart little device which brings that piece of timber back to the operator..or helper..to stack, this, obviously as the saw ''head'' comes back along the  track, ready for the next cut

Mike

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Another question.

I want to build some timber frame or post and beam structures. The mill I'm considering can cut a board up to 21 inches wide but only 7 inches deep. 

Would 7 inches be deep enough to cut proper beams??.

I'm thinking so. Most beams could be less than 7 inches on the narrow side. If I need a bigger beam I could cut it down to size from the outside like @Dave Shepard did.

Don't @bitty do timber frame too?

Thx-Ace 

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I have not done timber frame yet but I hope to 

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We did 4x12 Douglas Fir, only built one, Dave would be the one to ask.

They were all I could do to lift my end when I was in my prime, sort of committed climbing ladders, got lots better gear for that now

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12 hours ago, acem said:

Another question.

I want to build some timber frame or post and beam structures. The mill I'm considering can cut a board up to 21 inches wide but only 7 inches deep. 

Would 7 inches be deep enough to cut proper beams??.

I'm thinking so. Most beams could be less than 7 inches on the narrow side. If I need a bigger beam I could cut it down to size from the outside like @Dave Shepard did.

Don't @bitty do timber frame too?

Thx-Ace 

Ace:  Beams are usually square .  I don't think 7" would be adequate for teh main beam in any sizable structure.  Someone else can confirm this.  Didn't someone on here do a post and beam shop not too long ago?

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1 hour ago, acem said:

Watched this sell while planting beans. Like new woodmizer LT40

Wow!

$65,000 + 15% buyers premium =$75,000

Wow!

https://www.equipmentfacts.com/listings/construction-equipment/auctions/online/214776121/2020-wood-mizer-lt40

..that Ace is a chunk of change  allright.... with that sort of investment , you would need to be  marketing timber, full on

..how about you find me a 3/4 ton Dodge, 1993/4  Cummins...clean...and when I have finished with the Mahoe  mill..I can pack it up and send  it over..???

Mike  :)

NOT    a dually

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1 minute ago, acem said:

I'm a little confused.

93 is square body.

94 is rounded body

I have a 92 d350 club cab I'd sell. It's not clean but could be. 

...I often confuse people  !!..There was a Dodge truck from that era  that was a nice as looking truck ..that really appealed to me..Cummins power, one of the early diesels ...We can register a left hook truck over here..no worries, providing it is over twenty years old..but Ace...today the shipping would kill that project...It cost us Five and half  thousand USD's  to bring over a   40 ft container , back in 2008...then it cost us seven thousand NZD'd   to get it out of customs  and import, duty. tax  etc etc...Five IH tractors ..a 1959 Thunderbird and a vintage JD plough ..plus other tools etc...

So as much as I would like to do that..the cost, today, would be prohibitive....sadly

Mike

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On 6/18/2022 at 9:22 PM, acem said:

Watched this sell while planting beans. Like new woodmizer LT40

Wow!

$65,000 + 15% buyers premium =$75,000

Wow!

https://www.equipmentfacts.com/listings/construction-equipment/auctions/online/214776121/2020-wood-mizer-lt40

But, if sawing was your part time business..... 75,000/$75hr =1000hrs/20 hrs/week =50 weeks.  Actually, rates may be closer to 100/hr now.  But, for sawing boards for your own use, yes that's a lot of money.

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1 hour ago, yellowrosefarm said:
On 6/18/2022 at 9:22 PM, acem said:

Watched this sell while planting beans. Like new woodmizer LT40

Wow!

$65,000 + 15% buyers premium =$75,000

Wow!

https://www.equipmentfacts.com/listings/construction-equipment/auctions/online/214776121/2020-wood-mizer-lt40

Expand  

But, if sawing was your part time business..... 75,000/$75hr =1000hrs/20 hrs/week =50 weeks.  Actually, rates may be closer to 100/hr now. 

thats how the elite calculate. - $30hr for operator, + transport/site costs and $.25 bf for operating + repairs.

And would need to be FULL time BUSINESS !!! of which 75% > have folded.

 a 40 would not hold up or keep up as a full time .bTOS go with the 70 and a lot of repairs/rebuild by 5k hrs.

actually here its + - $85hr /base , $105 on site + blades ,damage ,help etc etc (3-8hr min etc)

If all wasnt being exploited now that is a < > $46 K unit NEW, IF !!!! WM were to purchase used  $25-27 K

3yr old - 20% (ink the check) - 8 % 3x     ..... $42K - $10K - $9600

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