Jump to content

Bean rollers...not popular in the Corn Belt?


SDman
 Share

Recommended Posts

I normally roll dry planted rice but didn't get to this year because of rain. It helps with seed soil contact.

No rocks on my place which is rare round here. Mostly rocks and hills. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

44 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

  Lot of real estate moved around here in May.  

Lol....they use that term up there, too? Every time we have a bad windstorm, I hear that comment repeatedly by all the farmers coming in. We had a lot of wind erosion in March and April. Same thing we've always had problems with....single-disc no-till drills going into soybean stubble, which creates a vulnerable seedbed until the spring wheat gets established. I saw ditches with 2-3' of topsoil from the field on the other side of the fence more than once. I know a couple guys even went and broke out their old hoe drills for spring wheat so they didn't have to worry about the wind erosion problems. I tease all the no-tillers that we never had a large problem with blowing fields until the advent of no-till. Its not really a fair comparison since we didn't raise soybeans until no-till came along.

Your picture of coil packers brings back memories. Back in the 1970s, many farmers used a coil packer/clod buster/mulcher pulled with a moldboard plow, and then they pulled a 6-7' press drill with it, too. Made for one pass seeding. I know my Dad used to talk about having a setup like that until the early 1970s.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Getting to be quite a few around my part of Northern Illinois. CaseIH dealer has a brand new 46’ for $56,000. In dry spring they use them to seal ground and hold moisture along with pushing rocks down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably should have rolled my wheat. Cold wet spring planted 1.25”  was worried about crusting. I have a terrible stand. Behind the track whacker 1.75” stand is fine. Next time going back to 1.75 

621CC17A-FC31-45AA-AB97-DC666532B443.jpeg

9F1C616E-A207-4B3F-80A8-B8F1237AEAEF.jpeg

DAC166C1-2BD7-40D7-9D66-87C7E484DA51.jpeg

73FB9B99-6FEE-41E1-AACD-2BB55E7BB8F1.jpeg

F5F5581C-8D1C-4247-B099-A5B957DB22B0.jpeg

18B64818-DEBE-4137-8689-4469BF79E6AB.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

Maybe, maybe not.  But I would take your fighting rain over our dryness any day of the week and twice on Sunday.  Lot of real estate moved around here in May.  

It’s probably just trading one set of problems for another, no matter where you farm. Sometimes here you have to fold a 60’ planter 10+ times a day. There are terraces and ditches everywhere. We can’t move machinery at certain times of the day because the traffic is so bad. I’m not very well traveled, but I’d like to see what it’s like where when you ask someone how much they have left to plant, the answer is given in sections instead of acres. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

The corn belt must not have any rocks

I know my part of MN isn’t really considered the corn belt, but it is considered the rock belt! There are some places in our fields where you can’t find dirt! But luckily those places have rock no bigger than a football! We roll all bean ground, should do it after planting, but go before just so the top isn’t tabletop flat for wind erosion, let the planter fluff it up a little again.  Some times I have to turn back and hit the rock a second time to get it pushed in better.  Then the following spring those usually get picked because of less trash left behind. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

We roll what we can. This explains why after up is done in places. We have a 30' Mandako. Here wind erosion is not a threat , rocks and stones are bad. First time I heard about rolling post emergence was on the sales DVD of a few of the roller brands

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, brahamfireman said:

Is that a 1206 wheatland with an adjustable front end?

I've had to roll bean ground ahead of planting because of roller availability and it was really sweet to plant into,  wish I could do it every year like that.

Here my turbo 806 pulling the roller a few years ago, 36 feet was a good load for it.

 

20190613_180554.jpg

20190613_180627.jpg

It’s a 1256 row crop.   Dad bought it with the lights in grille and no fenders. We added fenders we had laying around.    It has long axles and a standard drawbar

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not to far from Nate here in central MN some roll before planting some after  It is used for all crops especially hay fields,  Brillion style is preferred even have a couple of customers that roll corn stalks  behind a chopping head before they bale them claim its easier on the baler pickup.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, R190 said:

Not to far from Nate here in central MN some roll before planting some after  It is used for all crops especially hay fields,  Brillion style is preferred even have a couple of customers that roll corn stalks  behind a chopping head before they bale them claim its easier on the baler pickup.

We don’t have a chopping head but one fall a bearing went out of stalk chopper late Saturday so we hooked up the brillion.  Stalks were dry and basically snapped off.  More bales and faster.   Got done before the rain.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, R190 said:

Not to far from Nate here in central MN some roll before planting some after  It is used for all crops especially hay fields,  Brillion style is preferred even have a couple of customers that roll corn stalks  behind a chopping head before they bale them claim its easier on the baler pickup.

Untouched chopping head stalks will murder a rake.  All the cornstalk and bean straw acres that I rake get rolled.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  I think someone in here hit the nail on the head.  We just don’t have any rocks.  The soil is very forgiving and it’s just not something that is done here.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, billonthefarm said:

  I think someone in here hit the nail on the head.  We just don’t have any rocks.  The soil is very forgiving and it’s just not something that is done here.

Amen, around here toggle trip or AR bottoms on plows were purchased for the extra trash clearance they provided, not the rock protection!

We have rocks , but only on a couple little gravel hilltops......nowhere else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...