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Fuel truck axle cap


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Hope I can explain this as I have not been involved other than taking a quick look at it while they were swearing at working on it. 

One of the tank wagons I deliver fuel to has a truck with a leaking axle seal. 

The end cap on the axle has these cone shaped washers under the nuts that hold the cap on. 

I assume they help to locate the cap on the hub?

They cannot pop these loose to get the cap off to get at the seal. 

Any ideas or need any more information to know what the **** I am talking about?

i did not snap a pic but could if I go in to town today. 

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Common. Sharply "rap" the center of the axle shaft with a 10# sledgehammer, (or better) and they will pop free. Be careful to not his the studs. I back the nuts off till they are at the end of the threads so you can remove them after smacking the axle shaft.

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11 minutes ago, Troll said:

Common. Sharply "rap" the center of the axle shaft with a 10# sledgehammer, (or better) and they will pop free. Be careful to not his the studs. I back the nuts off till they are at the end of the threads so you can remove them after smacking the axle shaft.

He has smacked the cap, the hub and with the nuts run out, the end of the studs.

I just texted him your suggestion about the axle tube.

Thank you.

IMG_20220531_102249.thumb.jpg.8b0c46b63e2b56948808dc7b876d0226.jpg

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11 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I’d try an air hammer on the area around the studs. 

When I told him I was reaching out for help, he sent me this text.

" I've tried smacking cap, rim edge, backside rim, inbetween bolts.

I've put an air hammer on the bolt and inbetween the bolts.

I've put a screw driver between the slot and tried to pry it open.

I've tried a screw driver and or chisel with a hammer to rotate the washer. 

I've trieed to turn the washer. "

 

He has not replied back to me on the axle tube smack.

 

I also mentioned very localized heat on the washer but he has not told me he has tried that yet. 

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Dealt with those a lot on older Chevy trucks. Smacking center of axle sometimes worked, beating outside of axle down to drive taper out was needed sometimes, most of the time backing studs out of hub brought tapered cones out. They were overtorqued and set into the axle shaft. Probably did a few hundred of those type of axles, but I could swing a hammer better a few years ago. Tell your friend good luck with them and they will come eventually.

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Had a tough one like this last week at work.   Had to heat the taper cones just to get them loose, then used a pliers to unthread them off the studs.   They are not suppose to have threads but had ridges like threads and would not release.  It is also wise to keep nuts on when whaling on axle cup in case you miss and sometimes the wedges will fly out like bullets.  

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Rockwell Standard axle from the photos and the tapered cones always freeze to the taper in the axle shaft and this causes them to swell against the stud. There is a puller made for them that attaches to the wheel studs with two jaws to pull the axle but I've never needed it. I see one broken free, and one starting to break free. Best bet is to continue on the sledgehammer method right in the center of the axle cap. Very "sharp" raps are required that are solid.

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If it’s not coming apart as per Trolls suggestion, you’re not hitting it hard enough. A 20lb sledge would be better, because more weight makes it possible to take more careful aim, to avoid mangling the studs. As opposed to winding up like you’re over home plate at the bottom of the ninth.

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41 minutes ago, Binderoid said:

If it’s not coming apart as per Trolls suggestion, you’re not hitting it hard enough. A 20lb sledge would be better, because more weight makes it possible to take more careful aim, to avoid mangling the studs. As opposed to winding up like you’re over home plate at the bottom of the ninth.

Never known a man or woman of any size who could swing a 20lb sledge accurately with any amount of force to speak of. 

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Ford used these and they are a PITA.

After you get the axle out and the seal fixed, be sure to torque each nut and cone.

Unsure amount but I am thinking 50 ft/lbs.

Then drive it a few miles and retorque them.

Keep retorquing until you get zero movement.

If you do not torque/retorque you will get to know about drilling out the broken studs.

Ask me how I know?

Save yourself all the grief!

Yes, you miss with the sledge and you now have a big mess.

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Lightly grease the outer taper and use quality Nylok nuts to keep the water out of the area and there is a LOT less grief the next time they need removed.

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6 minutes ago, Sledgehammer said:

Never known a man or woman of any size who could swing a 20lb sledge accurately with any amount of force to speak of. 

 

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D1O_3806t1JM&psig=AOvVaw0dq9rFs9cekvxqAUn3AzCQ&ust=1654107225121000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAkQjRxqFwoTCOic39-rivgCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAL

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51 minutes ago, Owen Aaland said:

The tool bolts on to two studs and allows you to really hit the end to jar the cones loose.

KEI-K-1280

It helps a lot if both tires are still installed.

I am really trying to get him to try heat with oxy/acet and small welding tip but he is afraid of it being on propane truck.

Wish I had time to run in and do it but I need to get out and get ready for three loads of cows just now found out I have coming in tomorrow. 

He really likes the idea of this tool and is going to look for one. 

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Wack with sledge in center. Small like 1/4" cold chisel driven in gap of cone then try to turn and repeat as necessary. I worked with a man who had started breaking limestone with a hammer in a quarry when he was 12 or so. I've never seen anyone else who could swing one as hard and accurately as he could.

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2 hours ago, Owen Aaland said:

The tool bolts on to two studs and allows you to really hit the end to jar the cones loose.

KEI-K-1280

It helps a lot if both tires are still installed.

Any idea as to what brand of tool you have there?

All full floating rear ends tend to have sticking axles not just the cone types.

Also the Rockwell/Dana/Spicer web site has (Free to download) service manuals for most of the axles they ever produced.

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I have a buddy who had a 92 Ford with a turned up 7.3, who broke the studs on the axle pretty regular. 
 

I agree with the beating in the center of the axle. Get Arron Galoway, or Jordan Pitkin to swing the sledge for a bit, but hold the, well just get them to muscle up. 

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5 hours ago, nomorejohndeere said:

Leave nuts off and drive around 

 

 

It will fall off right as DOT is driving upon you ....

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I would like to take my oxy/acet in with a small welding tip and try for him but I've got 8 loads of pairs coming starting tomorrow that will need to go to grass so it would be at least Sunday. 

I guess if he doesn't have it by then I will go in. 

I think he is looking for the tool that Owen mentioned above. 

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remembered them well by 3rd sentence,.......good luck....many things to try and not have it happen the next time.

Holding your mouth, just So on the 20th (good ) hit helps.

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Jeff,

Talk to a heavy towing company as they pull axles on a regular basis.  It might just be cheaper to hire them to pull the axle than to buy the tool for the single use.

There are pliers made specifically for removing those split axle cones.  One jaw is pointed to spread the cone for removal.

 

Other Jeff.

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