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I have a bit of a rhetorical question, but how many years do you have to go to college to design farm equipment at a major manufacturer? Spend time developing new designs, spending money on R&D, testing, etc. and then after all that come up with the idiotic idea to run all the hydraulic lines through the tubing that makes up the frame. I spent several hours today doing what could be a simple job. Over time the tubing fills up with dirt and trash and makes it hard to get the old line out, but is a nightmare to get the new one in. It just seems ridiculous to turn what could be an easy job into a major ordeal. I have seen equipment built this way for years and I for one am sick of it. 

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Not to mention good luck finding the leaking hose when the oil is just pouring out of the end of the tube.

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I ran a prototype JD air cart this spring so I got my fill of “real life” engineers.  For one afternoon I had the head engineer for JD air seeding equipment riding with me.  And for the next 2 days I had the guy right below him whose team designs everything green and yellow.  Interesting experience to say the least and I did pick their brain a little and make some suggestions.  
 

 

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27 minutes ago, tractorholic said:

That’s a great idea but you still hafta know which one is leaking.

Replace em both? 

Also couldn't you screw the end of the new to one end of the old and pull it thru that way? 

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I had the opportunity to run some hay equipment from ROC once when I worked for a custom harvester, a front mounted disk mower and a merger very similar to what oxbo has now. The merger was struggling with the heavy first crop alfalfa and was plugging up due to the cross belt being too narrow. I unplugged it probably half a dozen times before a pickup pulled in with the dealer, the custom harvester I was working for, and a couple other gentleman. ROC equipment from what I was told was made in Italy. After unplugging the machine a few times in what were normal conditions for our crops I was kind of worked up. One of the guys in the truck asked what I thought of the merger and I replied, I don't know how they do it in Italy but here in America this is, explitive, unacceptable. It turned out that the two other men in the truck were engineers from ROC.

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Case runs theirs through the backhoe boom, they go in rubber and come out steel in some places. If one blows , you have to resign yourself to needing a change of clothes before getting back in the truck. 

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36 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Replace em both? 

Also couldn't you screw the end of the new to one end of the old and pull it thru that way? 

This planter has seven hoses through this particular tube as well as several wiring harnesses.  We had no way to know what we needed until we got the old ones out. Two had to be replaced. 

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I think they route the hoses through the tube for aesthetics and for protection. I don't think we had a tongue on the place that didn't have black tire marks on it from turning too sharply. 

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8 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

I think they route the hoses through the tube for aesthetics and for protection. I don't think we had a tongue on the place that didn't have black tire marks on it from turning too sharply. 

This is what I am thinking too. A bunch of hoses and tubing on the outside is going to be damaged much more easily in transport or use. 

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27 minutes ago, MTB98 said:

This is what I am thinking too. A bunch of hoses and tubing on the outside is going to be damaged much more easily in transport or use. 

I ripped up hoses, filter housing and a hydraulic filter on a tractor when scooping up brush a few years ago. 99% of it was well aligned, all laying transverse relative to the tractor. One long straight piece was not. Front tire rolled over it, bending it like a "U". One end of the "U" aligned just right and poked and tore everything up. 

I was saying to myself while repairing, that it would have made more sense to route them inboard the chassis...

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1 hour ago, KWRB said:

Ahhh. The age old pastime of ragging on engineers ...

It is just like Lucas electric jokes.  A junior editor somewhere printed them in a magazine once and received a nasty letter from the Lucas company for their trouble.  Junior editor was rather taken aback and was going to publish an apology.  At some point, junior editor showed the response from Lucas to the senior editor.  “Write back to Lucas” said the senior editor somewhat heatedly “If they hadn’t produced JUNK products for X years, there WOULDN'T BE Lucas Electric jokes."

Same for engineers.  If there wasn’t a pretty continuous supply of STUPIDITY that finds its way out on commercial products, people wouldn’t cuss the engineers.  Although a decent bit of the blame for poor designs does need to fall on the bean counters who think they are smarter than the engineers.  

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I don’t know that is just the engineers.  Having the bean counters and sales guys there doesn’t help.  Now when the engineer says we really need X for the hoses, but the bean counter says “whoa, that will cost….” And the sales guy is upset because it will miss his sales price point and look like Frankenstein you get hoses in box tube. 

Then you get into the department design method. This is where one group does one system, and another group does the other and so on.  Remember the mustang that the rear seat when you folded it forward to get in back hit the horn, classic example of this type of management 

 


 

 

 

 

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15 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

I ran a prototype JD air cart this spring so I got my fill of “real life” engineers.  For one afternoon I had the head engineer for JD air seeding equipment riding with me.  And for the next 2 days I had the guy right below him whose team designs everything green and yellow.  Interesting experience to say the least and I did pick their brain a little and make some suggestions.  
 

 

But did you give them a piece of your mind????

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6 hours ago, KWRB said:

Ahhh. The age old pastime of ragging on engineers ...

So who would you have me blame when I’m changing oil in my daughter's F150 EcoBoost?  The drain plug dumps oil onto a torsion bar.  I solved that PITA with a EZ Drain valve, I now attach a hose and flip the valve to drain it. Can’t see the oil filter, and God forbid you tighten it too much, that really sucks.  There is a drain tray for the oil filter, but it’s mounted too far away from the filter, so it’s pointless to have it there.  I hope I never have to change the alternator, it’s mounted under the engine.  Why do the front differentials not have drain plugs?   Even dealerships can’t get the front cover resealed half the time because of all the obstructions. Never mind that the check/fill plug is inaccessible to everyone but AntMan. Sure makes me appreciate a 3/4 ton pickup when I have to work on this thing.  

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19 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I have a bit of a rhetorical question, but how many years do you have to go to college to design farm equipment at a major manufacturer? Spend time developing new designs, spending money on R&D, testing, etc. and then after all that come up with the idiotic idea to run all the hydraulic lines through the tubing that makes up the frame. I spent several hours today doing what could be a simple job. Over time the tubing fills up with dirt and trash and makes it hard to get the old line out, but is a nightmare to get the new one in. It just seems ridiculous to turn what could be an easy job into a major ordeal. I have seen equipment built this way for years and I for one am sick of it. 

DFP....the ultimate in hydralic hose repair has to be retractable hoses  (like   four plus )  in the American Skytrack   Boom......Replacing the correct one in that mess of hydralic oil is nigh impossible.....You have to have arms like Inspector   Gadjet......The first one I replaced took for ever   and after it was all over...I grabbed a container of hand cleaner....stripped off into the birthday suit and immersed my good self in the warm embrace of  the Atlantic Ocean....   (This when working in the Caribbean...)

Mike

 

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Mike:"  Was it in the plastic link belt holder inside the boom?  I had to do that once on a 40 foot Marklift with telescopic boom.  Fun isn't it!!  "You can't get there from here!"

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3 hours ago, mike newman said:

DFP....the ultimate in hydralic hose repair has to be retractable hoses  (like   four plus )  in the American Skytrack   Boom......Replacing the correct one in that mess of hydralic oil is nigh impossible.....You have to have arms like Inspector   Gadjet......The first one I replaced took for ever   and after it was all over...I grabbed a container of hand cleaner....stripped off into the birthday suit and immersed my good self in the warm embrace of  the Atlantic Ocean....   (This when working in the Caribbean...)

Mike

 

JCB telehandlers come to mind ….

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