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Some Mack candy


jeeper61

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We were there to install a new to them CMM 

The old CMM was a Leitz moving table CMM vintage 1985 parts NLA replaced with a refurbished 2004 Brown & Shapre Global CMM

The Leitz CMM was 20K the rigger had Versa lift 25/35 with the moving counter weight 

 

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The mack E7-4 valve PLN motor has to be one of the most durable ever made.  Im Not really sold on the camelback but they are a rugged truck .  I never saw a new camelback.  The ones I have been around usually needed major work by the time we got them.

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I used to make the head bolts for mack trucks. they were really picky. Had to shut down every half hour take sample to lab section treads boil in acid check under microscope. 80's and 90's. made thousands a day when had a run. went to allentown pa i believe.

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1 hour ago, jeeper61 said:

We were there to install a new to them CMM 

The old CMM was a Leitz moving table CMM vintage 1985 parts NLA replaced with a refurbished 2004 Brown & Shapre Global CMM

The Leitz CMM was 20K the rigger had Versa lift 25/35 with the moving counter weight 

 

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Awesome.  That's a bit bigger CMM than what I program on.  We do run Brown & Sharpe/ Hexagon CMMs, though. Cool Mack to. 

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I'll take an old RD686 with a tip-turbine 300 with a straight 5 speed turning a set of .464 rears on camel back over anything built today. Beast of a machine for off road. Our one is a DM with a set of .634 rears and it will only do around 50 mph wound out

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18 minutes ago, IHandJDman said:

Awesome.  That's a bit bigger CMM than what I program on.  We do run Brown & Sharpe/ Hexagon CMMs, though. Cool Mack to. 

That's a 9 15 8 Global CMM with a Leitz Scanning head and PC Dims Software

Two old DEA 5 axis CMMs in the back ground with Renishaw PH10 probing systems

I have been servicing CMMs for B&S and Hexagon for 32 years 

That Leitz CMM we took out was at China Lake Naval Weapons Center in Rigecrest CA when I started in 1989 I have packed and moved it 4 times for various projects 

  

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6 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

What’s a CMM? 

A Coordinate Measuring Machine is a CNC measuring device device used for Dimensional inspection of manufactured products.

This is the modern way of inspecting machined parts they have replaced the surface plate and height gage type measurements.

They are programed via software that uses the CAD model to pick the inspection points or can be programed from a blue print.

Modern CMMs have sub micron accuracy 

I like to call them inspection robots  

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I wonder if it became to easy to build a computerized inspection machine or it became to hard to find that person with impeccable character and unbending principals to run the Quality Control department.

Those sliding counter weight  fork trucks are brilliant, I miss industry just a little since retirement. Cool Mack, thanks for sharing.

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16 minutes ago, just Dave said:

I wonder if it became to easy to build a computerized inspection machine or it became to hard to find that person with impeccable character and unbending principals to run the Quality Control department.

Parts that are made today are way to complex to inspect any other way 

With the sample sizes needed in high volume production the hand inspection of parts is too slow 

When 1st started in 1989 I made several repair calls at Hughes Aircraft because someone in the group of the "old school"  inspectors felt threatened by the new CMM and kept sabotaging it.  Hughes finally made a sperate department for automated inspection to get the CMMs away from those threats.

CMMs have come down in price considerably since the 80s that Leitz PMM we pulled out was 1 million dollars in 1985 

It's hand lapped ways are a marvel of German craftsmanship but with modern electronic compensation it is no longer required to build to such precision to obtain even better accuracy and CMM of that same high accuracy type is less than half the cost now and the smallest low accuracy systems are in the 30K range   

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1 hour ago, Rawleigh99 said:

Really cool!  Jeepers, can you share what the plant makes, or is that proprietary?

That plant makes repair parts for older military aircraft.

When a plane goes out of production a lot of the parts are NLA 

The government owns the designs and they contract the manufacture of these parts out when the OEM no longer wants to make them

In many cases the tooling is owned by the government and transferred around to different projects as was the case here.

They should have scraped that Leitz PMM years ago we stopped making repair parts for it 20 years ago but it just keeps running 

The last time it broke earlier this year I had to make a cable harness because it was NLA and noticed on all the other cabling the insolation was decaying

I told them it was time to pull the plug for two reasons

1) the parts availability

2) I am the only one left at our company that knows any thing about that type system it was discontinued in 1995 and I retire in 3 years 

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22 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

someone in the group of the "old school"  inspectors felt threatened by the new CMM and kept sabotaging it.

Bad apples are out there. The shame is shared by a company that could not put that sick man on the curb.

 

23 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

Parts that are made today are way to complex to inspect any other way 

I agree; with the quality of personnel available, but It can be done as it was done when back when these aircraft were built.

22 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

That plant makes repair parts for older military aircraft.

I very much admire your ability to work with/on complex circuitry like the modern production and inspection eqpt. That stuff boggles my mind. I'm not a hater of CNC I just know that we are short of Machinist quality skills and integrity in people these days.  Once the discipline is lost it will be hard to regain. We don't want to find America as the machine Operator department for the highly skilled Tool and Die department overseas.

3 years goes fast Congratulations jeeper61

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6 hours ago, just Dave said:

Bad apples are out there. The shame is shared by a company that could not put that sick man on the curb.

 

I agree; with the quality of personnel available, but It can be done as it was done when back when these aircraft were built.

I very much admire your ability to work with/on complex circuitry like the modern production and inspection eqpt. That stuff boggles my mind. I'm not a hater of CNC I just know that we are short of Machinist quality skills and integrity in people these days.  Once the discipline is lost it will be hard to regain. We don't want to find America as the machine Operator department for the highly skilled Tool and Die department overseas.

3 years goes fast Congratulations jeeper61

Its hard to get rid of the bad apples in large union shops 

I am not sure what they teach in the votech schools hopefully they still teach some manual machining 

I worked in my Gampa's tool and die shop after school that's where I learned 

By the time I started working as machinist to earn a living CNC machines were starting to make an appearance

I ended up learning there operation they were still punch tape then

The basic principles are they same, speeds and feed rates etc. and now they have software that calculates tool paths from CAD

I decided I would rather repair them than run them'

I got in to the CMMs because they are generally in cleaner locations 

 

The advent of the CMM has allowed inspection in 3D IMO this has revolutionized manufacturing allowing real time feed back to the CNC metal cutting machines.

Modern engines last much longer because of ability to measure in 3d precisely and feed this information back into the manufacturing process 

Jet engine compressor blades have a complex 3D air foil shape before CNC they were machined chemically which involved a lot toxic waste 

Measuring them was done by tracing with a pantograph machine and the shape was traced onto a mylar and compared on a optical comparator to a master trace.

Very time consuming 

All this is done on CMMs now and recently we have developed non-contact laser measuring sensors that speed up the process considerably

We are not to far from the "Replicator" on Star Track with reverse engineering software  Optical measuring  and 3d printing 

Looking forward to working on my toy's when I retire 

 

 

  

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On 5/28/2022 at 1:58 PM, jeeper61 said:

I decided I would rather repair them than run them'

I got in to the CMMs because they are generally in cleaner locations

You are obviously smart with your choices.

I get the future and I appreciate what CNC can accomplish. I would like to see more of this equipment built and developed here. It seems the brunt of it comes from Europe.

My first paying job in machining was 1981. They had a couple NC Burgmasters and a CNC Bridgeport. I often ran miniature pump parts on a manual lathe. They were for a spray bar dampening system for printing. A small brass blind cylinder with two o-ring grooves 1 ID 1 OD. I made my set up with one turning/grooving/cut-off tool  and one ID groove/ boring bar tool both in the same corner of a four way with no indexing required. I also punched thru with a #3 screw mach. drill so no center drill needed. I would crank those those little pump housings out faster than an old automatic lathe would run them. I was hooked. Manual would be my course. I have been retired now for 5 yrs in November and putter with Machine Tools and Tractors in my basement shop. It is a hoot!

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