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D236 Diesel engine blown head gasket


Astro209
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Hello everyone!

Hope everyone is doing well! Was hoping to get a little advice on a project. 

I have an old International 3616 backhoe/loader with what I believe to be a D-236 diesel engine. 

It was in pretty bad shape when I got it. I managed to get it running, but from what I could tell it was down 2 cylinders. I had some emergencies around the property that I had to address, so I nursed it to get a few short light weight jobs done. Now I am ready to reward the beast and get this engine back to a fully functional state. 

Began disassembly a few weeks back and found a blown head-gasket. It was blow in-between the second and third cylinders in a small section and when I look at the edges of the sleeves they do not appear perfectly smooth on the top like the other sleeves in most places. 

I was originally planning to do a full in-frame rebuild with all new sleeves and pistons etc..  but my primary concern is replacing the sleeves. I do not have the machine recommended and since the engine is still in the frame, I cannot take it to a shop. 

So... opinions would be greatly appreciated as to whether I might be able to keep all the sleeves as is and just use the aluminum paint method with a new head gasket? Not sure if the edges of those two sleeves will support another 5 to 10 years of light duty. It seems like the head-gasket seals in-between the sleeves so I feel like this might be ok?

Or, does anyone out there still have a tool they made or the electric press machine to remove and replace sleeves on this engine, that they are interested in parting ways with? 

I haven't started the full cleaning process yet so excuss the grim and gunk in the pictures. 

Any help is greatly appreciated. 

See pics for more details. 

Thanks!

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In my own personal opinion you don't have a prayer  without machining both block and head and setting new sleeves to proper stand proud. As to a sleeve press. 80-90 percent of those engines were overhauled with a press plate and a three pound hammer.

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Astro, replace the sleeves, it's not that hard, we did a DT282, we pulled the sleeves with a shop made puller that only took a couple of hour's time to make with some material we had laying around. We put the new sleeves in the freezer overnight and they almost dropped in from their own weight, the last inch or two we knocked in with a block of wood and a three pound hammer. Make sure the installed sleeve height is within spec.

IH D282 pulling sleeve.jpg

IH D282 sleeve puller.jpg

IH D282 sleeve pulling.jpg

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I agree with the proper fix BUT a recently passed buddy used to love old 6 cyl Jaguars and they had some groove that could be prone to head gasket failures in the same area, he was a millwright and even he didn't condone this but filled the void with epoxy and machined it flat and never had another issue, it could be a low $$ try, might want to take the head in to a shop, sidenote he must have had a thing for 🐈 as he loved cougars also 🤔

If the fire has gone out in those 2 holes for a while it might be worthwhile inspecting the bottom end with fuel diluting the oil...of course being diesel you should have higher compression than a gas engine in that area

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Great advice from everyone. Thank you for this help. Honestly I would rather do this right the first time, even if it means extra work now. In CA, all the machine shops seem to be disappearing, so the ones left are super backed-up. If I get the head in to the shop this week, they won't even look at it for 2 to 3 months. 

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Astro, where are you located? American cylinder head in Oakland has done 282 heads for me, crack repair, guides, valves etc, Arvid Elbeck is the owner, very knowledgable on these heads, they have repaired many of the 282 heads in the past. 

American Cylinder Head.jpg

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7 hours ago, Astro209 said:

Great advice from everyone. Thank you for this help. Honestly I would rather do this right the first time, even if it means extra work now. In CA, all the machine shops seem to be disappearing, so the ones left are super backed-up. If I get the head in to the shop this week, they won't even look at it for 2 to 3 months. 

Machine shops being backed up is not unique to CA. I would be skeptical of any shop that is not booked up. Things are always falling apart faster than they can be put back together. 

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louie figone, it looks like you have the wide flange sleeve engine. Isn't mine the hard press model? I want to believe it would be that easy to replace the sleeves, but from what I have read on this forum, I would need a hydraulic press. Hopefully I am wrong. Can anyone confirm this? 

If I CAN do these sleeves without a press, I would really like to do so. I do have a 20 ton manual hydraulic press that I might be able to modify to work over the cylinders. 

Regarding the head shop, I do have a reputable shop near by here in Stockton. I'll keep the Oakland contact on file in case something doesn't work out. Thanks for the suggestion on that! 

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My mistake. On closer inspection what I thought were flanges are head gasket marks. Still need to pull sleeves to machine low spot from block. Opportunity to try to find D301 pistons and go sleeveless.

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16 minutes ago, snoshoe said:

My mistake. On closer inspection what I thought were flanges are head gasket marks. Still need to pull sleeves to machine low spot from block. Opportunity to try to find D301 pistons and go sleeveless.

Hum, I have not heard of this! I will need to do more research.

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35 minutes ago, Astro209 said:

I have not been able to find one. Where is it located??

Not sure on the D236, the D282 is located on the right side of the engine to the front and above the fuel injection pump, look there, if it is an early engine then it is located on a pad on the left side of the engine to the front and above the oil cooler mounting pad. 

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9 hours ago, snoshoe said:

My mistake. On closer inspection what I thought were flanges are head gasket marks. Still need to pull sleeves to machine low spot from block. Opportunity to try to find D301 pistons and go sleeveless.

My mistake again. Pin hole will be in wrong place with this crank.

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I see two flat spots on the block on the exhaust side of the engine. Neither has any numbers. I see where the firing order is on the block, and some numbers further down on the side of the block, but nothing that looks like a serial number. As I recall, this tractor is a 1976 if that helps. 20220526_075646.thumb.jpg.13dda717b791f3d949e5cdf98e009e6f.jpg20220526_075632.thumb.jpg.4fe55914d90ee10d344fbd7132d3a049.jpg

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5 hours ago, Astro209 said:

 Found it!!! Thanks for the direction. 

 

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So, am I back to needing a machine to remove and reinsert these sleeves???

 

Thanks for all the help.

Correct answer is probably. Sleeves can still be driven in. Purpose of the press is the pressure guage to measure force needed to move sleeve. Truth is someone with experience would know by starting sleeve by hand whether pressure was high or low. Just by how far sleeve entered by hand. Sleeve must fit tight enough to hold stand out as flange is not bottomed. If fit to tight. Sleeve will buckle with heat scoring piston.

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The sleeves must be tight enough in the block so the heat of combustion transfers to the sleeve, to the block and then to the coolant.

A loose sleeve acts as a barrier to the transfer of heat and then scores pistons.

Those sleeves also need to be installed DRY.

No lubricant.

If you would pull the engine, the machine shop can insure the deck on the block is correct.

They can install the sleeves and insure the protrusion is correct and that the head is flat and the valves are set correctly in the head.

Your call on this one!

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2 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

The sleeves must be tight enough in the block so the heat of combustion transfers to the sleeve, to the block and then to the coolant.

A loose sleeve acts as a barrier to the transfer of heat and then scores pistons.

Those sleeves also need to be installed DRY.

No lubricant.

If you would pull the engine, the machine shop can insure the deck on the block is correct.

They can install the sleeves and insure the protrusion is correct and that the head is flat and the valves are set correctly in the head.

Your call on this one!

Those sleeves do not seat on that little flange. They must be tight enough to hold position under full load combustion pressures. Loose sleeves simply windup in the pan in pieces. Yes the piston does get marked up in the process. Installation procedure as taught by IH at Hickory Hill. Involved bore and sleeve wet with diesel fuel.

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The bottom end seems to be in pretty good shape. It has been sitting for a year or so, but it should spin pretty easily. I tried wiggling everything in the bottom end and did not notice anything abnormal. All looks well lubbed and does not have excessive play. 

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