Jump to content

My rant for today.


dads706
 Share

Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, KWRB said:

He didn't buy a lorry? Lol. That's the problem with threads like this. Everyone gets shell shocked and anxious about their own spelling and grammar!

When I read the English/Canadian/Australian/new Zealandian (idk) spelling of neighbour, harbour, etc., I always say it like neighboor or harboor in my head, as in "cool" or "soothe". Then I chuckle to myself.

Easily amused is the way to be. It's a happy life.

ūüėÜ

No lorries here, nay-burr!  Is it gar-aje, gar-age or graje?  Rooooof or Ruuuuf? (point is- if we all pronounced every word the same way, we would be a dull lot.  As in your last statement- "easily amused is the way to be- it's a happy life" .  Agreed.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, mike newman said:

....whats  all that about then, bro???....sigh

Mike

image (17).png

I was kinda hoping you'd bail (bale?) me out, and tell me the demonym for New Zealand...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, td9bcf180 said:

No lorries here, nay-burr!  Is it gar-aje, gar-age or graje?  Rooooof or Ruuuuf? (point is- if we all pronounced every word the same way, we would be a dull lot.  As in your last statement- "easily amused is the way to be- it's a happy life" .  Agreed.

This reminds me quite a few years back there was a couple guys from Tennessee up here duck hunting. Got talking with them and when he said what he did for a job 3 of us all heard something different. To this day I have no idea what he said lol

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/21/2022 at 4:08 PM, oldtanker said:

I don't let any of it bother me. What bothers me is people claiming that it's the younger folks today that are not learning or being taught these things. I call BS on that. I had to deal with written statements my soldiers wrote in the late 1970s through 1996. Many I had to sit over them and help them rewrite them. Many, unedited, sounded like a 3rd world language. One, written by a young SGT, described the actions of one of his soldiers. He wrote "he done good, he done real good". IIRC that was in the early 80s.

Some were poor inner city kids, some country kids and some from middle class American suburbs.

 

Rick

Here's what the primitive people taught in the days of old:

This is what you would learn if you went to university in the 12th century.
Could modern schools and universities learn something from it?

A Thread.

There was, of course, no single Medieval curriculum.  But there was, undoubtedly, a unified mode of education.
 
That's what we'll be exploring here. So if you went to university in the 12th century, this is what you might expect to learn.

Bear in mind that Medieval students often started university at 14 years of age.

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1528171387936034817.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bill Bryson, in his "Shakespeare", goes into what William was likely taught at school.  Likely heavy doses of religion and Latin (like about 150 different ways of saying "Thank you for your letter") but not much else.

Not quite that far back - in the mid 1970's I showed a US university English major the English exam papers for the 1959 Senior exam here (high school graduation).  

Her comment was "Well that is interesting - I'll see some of that in my third year".

Added a touch of irony to the question asked more than once by people your side on finding I was from Australia - "Well how come you seem to speak such good English?"

Mind you our standards have gone downhill from there too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, KWRB said:

I was kinda hoping you'd bail (bale?) me out, and tell me the demonym for New Zealand...

Well, Bro...I can help you out here.....the demonym that has eluded you thus far., is    "Kiwi ""  or plural "Kiwi's "

...That is what we are known as...in the civilised   world....as in Australia...the British Isles .... Western Canada.....and South Africa

..The United States    general populace, have been far to preoccupied.. (.with some early military    exceptions)  ..to be bothered with us....down under...

The Kiwi is a flightless bird.....the similarity with the local homo sapiens   will possibly elude you, also...you would be in good company should that be so.....

..and finally, a ""Lorry'' is a form of a terrestial   conveyancer...found only in the British  Isles....no where else....

Right....now that we have sorted out some of the vexed issues that our Mate, KWRB,   was carrying on his shoulders...we can proceed to the picture of the current President of the United States...Mr Biden....(posted earlier   today...)who faces yet another challenge in the next day or so....when our very own   despot......is scheduled to have a meeting with  him...

She most certainly will challenge Mr Biden's   cognative  dissonance....he will be wondering just what he has struck.......just watch this  space......;)

 

Mike

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

Added a touch of irony to the question asked more than once by people your side on finding I was from Australia - "Well how come you seem to speak such good English?"

A good friend of mine, a Jamaican, while in college in Florida was conversing with a co-ed from Chicago, who marveled that he was able to learn English so quickly!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mike

Another test of "how it is said and where are you from" was that used by a Canadian (Major IIRC) "Scarlet O'Hara who was a POW in Colditz Castle.

His test sentence was "I saw thousands of Boy Scouts routing about in their brown trousers"

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, mike newman said:

Well, Bro...I can help you out here.....the demonym that has eluded you thus far., is    "Kiwi ""  or plural "Kiwi's "

...That is what we are known as...in the civilised   world....as in Australia...the British Isles .... Western Canada.....and South Africa

..The United States    general populace, have been far to preoccupied.. (.with some early military    exceptions)  ..to be bothered with us....down under...

The Kiwi is a flightless bird.....the similarity with the local homo sapiens   will possibly elude you, also...you would be in good company should that be so.....

..and finally, a ""Lorry'' is a form of a terrestial   conveyancer...found only in the British  Isles....no where else....

Right....now that we have sorted out some of the vexed issues that our Mate, KWRB,   was carrying on his shoulders...we can proceed to the picture of the current President of the United States...Mr Biden....(posted earlier   today...)who faces yet another challenge in the next day or so....when our very own   despot......is scheduled to have a meeting with  him...

She most certainly will challenge Mr Biden's   cognative  dissonance....he will be wondering just what he has struck.......just watch this  space......;)

 

Mike

 

I thought kiwi was slang, like calling Canadians Canucks. Not derogatory, but slang.

But the mention of the kiwi reminds me. NZ has the coolest air force roundel in the world.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, New Englander said:

A good friend of mine, a Jamaican, while in college in Florida was conversing with a co-ed from Chicago, who marveled that he was able to learn English so quickly!

I have a friend from British Guyana who always complains about American "English".  He claims to speak "proper Kings English" and a lot of times I have to agree with him!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Rawleigh99 said:

I have a friend from British Guyana who always complains about American "English".  He claims to speak "proper Kings English" and a lot of times I have to agree with him!

Or, as Patton famously said (at least in the movie) "we are 2 peoples separated by a common language"

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Steve C. said:

Here's what the primitive people taught in the days of old:

This is what you would learn if you went to university in the 12th century.
Could modern schools and universities learn something from it?

A Thread.

There was, of course, no single Medieval curriculum.  But there was, undoubtedly, a unified mode of education.
 
That's what we'll be exploring here. So if you went to university in the 12th century, this is what you might expect to learn.

Bear in mind that Medieval students often started university at 14 years of age.

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1528171387936034817.html

The writer of this piece seems to think that "humanism" is the ultimate pinnacle to achieve, and was the goal of that Medieval  system of learning. That, to me, sounds like they were trying to teach themselves to be God.  Which one could quickly draw a parallel with our current system.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/19/2022 at 3:33 PM, sandhiller said:

 

"She uses a little oil but outside of that she's cherry"¬†¬†ūüėČ

 

1319133763_hoytclagwell3.jpg.a1396ac2ffa690ea8fd174e48171f6d1.jpg

I put the nail in the slot and fired her up she coughed and belched up a bunch of smoke an I backed her through the hog-pen into the yard 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guys look at em. Government checks still have a witness line on for the person who witnesses your mark. Education for the masses didn't really start until the mid 1800s. The military had a huge issue in WWII with many draftees and enlistees being illiterate. Throughout my career from 74-96 US Army manuals were written at an 8th grade level. Shortly before I retired they were looking at redoing them at a 6th grade level. They decided against that at that time.

 

Rick  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, yellowrosefarm said:

The writer of this piece seems to think that "humanism" is the ultimate pinnacle to achieve, and was the goal of that Medieval  system of learning. That, to me, sounds like they were trying to teach themselves to be God.  Which one could quickly draw a parallel with our current system.

Yeah, I noticed that and wasn't excited about it.  But, the curriculum is so incredibly advanced compared to what's taught now that it puts us to shame.  I don't believe it would necessarily lead to the humanist path.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find that for all the complaints about the difficulty of English spelling it's a compact language compared to others. I make this observation as I'm often reading signs and placards that are written in multiple languages and noting how fewer words or letters it takes to convey the same message in English than in other languages. Note the "Fasten seat belt while seated" or "Life vest under seat" on your next airline flight. In the briefing card (you do read it, right?) often the other than English will use a smaller font to make the message fit in the same space. Anyone ever notice the length of some German words? Allergic to peanuts?  Nahrungsmittelunverträglichkeit!

Languages written in logograms seem fairly compact. Whereas I can usually decipher any of the Latin root languages I have no prayer to decipher Chinese or other Asian writing. Likewise Cyrillic although one of my colleagues managed to navigate us through the Moscow subway system. Most large cities in the world have at least some English signs but not Moscow subways.

Fortunately for me English is the primary language of aviation. My pilot certificate actually says "English proficient", It's an ICAO requirement that the FAA had to enforce and reissue everyone's certificate. The same for Brits, Kiwis, etc. 

So here's one:

A Lufthansa captain was being scolded by a ground controller at Frankfurt airport. Frankfurt ground control: "Lufthansa 123 please use English"

Lufthansa 123 indignantly: "I'm a German pilot flying a German airline in Germany, why must I use English?"

Unknown British Airways flight: "Because you lost the bloody war!"

  • Haha 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, New Englander said:

I find that for all the complaints about the difficulty of English spelling it's a compact language compared to others. I make this observation as I'm often reading signs and placards that are written in multiple languages and noting how fewer words or letters it takes to convey the same message in English than in other languages. Note the "Fasten seat belt while seated" or "Life vest under seat" on your next airline flight. In the briefing card (you do read it, right?) often the other than English will use a smaller font to make the message fit in the same space. Anyone ever notice the length of some German words? Allergic to peanuts?  Nahrungsmittelunverträglichkeit!

Languages written in logograms seem fairly compact. Whereas I can usually decipher any of the Latin root languages I have no prayer to decipher Chinese or other Asian writing. Likewise Cyrillic although one of my colleagues managed to navigate us through the Moscow subway system. Most large cities in the world have at least some English signs but not Moscow subways.

Fortunately for me English is the primary language of aviation. My pilot certificate actually says "English proficient", It's an ICAO requirement that the FAA had to enforce and reissue everyone's certificate. The same for Brits, Kiwis, etc. 

So here's one:

A Lufthansa captain was being scolded by a ground controller at Frankfurt airport. Frankfurt ground control: "Lufthansa 123 please use English"

Lufthansa 123 indignantly: "I'm a German pilot flying a German airline in Germany, why must I use English?"

Unknown British Airways flight: "Because you lost the bloody war!"

I am I non native German speaker. While the words like you showed are indeed very long, they're just compounds that contain their constituent pieces in whole. While I may have never come across the word, I absolutely know it's meaning, because bits and pieces haven't been chopped off. Tomato, tomato. (Yes I know that idiom makes no sense when written out. That's why I like it)

The British/German joke would be funnier if the punchline was. "Because you're in our airspace. Typical"

I'm sure you've heard this one: you're at a party and meet a group of strangers. How do you know who's (whose? Lol) a pilot in the group? They've told you twice before you can wonder for yourself.

And because it's not cool to just rip on others, an old (and hilarious) engineer joke: How do you know if the engineer you've just met is an extrovert? He's staring at *your* shoes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, KWRB said:

I am I non native German speaker. While the words like you showed are indeed very long, they're just compounds that contain their constituent pieces in whole. While I may have never come across the word, I absolutely know it's meaning, because bits and pieces haven't been chopped off. Tomato, tomato. (Yes I know that idiom makes no sense when written out. That's why I like it)

The British/German joke would be funnier if the punchline was. "Because you're in our airspace. Typical"

I'm sure you've heard this one: you're at a party and meet a group of strangers. How do you know who's (whose? Lol) a pilot in the group? They've told you twice before you can wonder for yourself.

And because it's not cool to just rip on others, an old (and hilarious) engineer joke: How do you know if the engineer you've just met is an extrovert? He's staring at *your* shoes.

..wot you on about there,bro.....???..you just trying to wind us poor folks up wit your windy crap...??

...don't give me no digger driver jokes either, bro

Your friend

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...