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The Deere of the Future


jeeper61
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Just now, sandhiller said:

Posts above show a lot of interest in their cab 

Soooo

Saw these new cab pics leaked.......😉

279182022_3312480732408348_8352671574622756047_n.jpg.e84e14ba288356e44026b8d11cb2f15c.jpg

That must be the “Nebraska Special”. Think of it like a Z06 package on a Corvette. 

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14 hours ago, TractormanMike.mb said:

If you showed a farmer from back then what today's tractors and equipment would be capable of they probably wouldn't believe it.

You don't even have to go that far back, 50-60 years, and in the case of electronics, guidance, and size/capacity, maybe only about 25-30 or so years, was when 'big' machines, started the great leap forward.

60 years ago the 560 was still in production, the JD 10 series was barely a year old, and IF the 5010 had been introduced it, and maybe the 1900 Oliver would have been the only 100+ HP, NON 4WD tractors on the market.  I believe the largest grain platforms for a combine was either 22 or 24ft (Engine size was right at 100 HP).

And a 40 year old farmer in the '60's undoubtedly had grown up using horses for at least part of the jobs

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4 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

You don't even have to go that far back, 50-60 years, and in the case of electronics, guidance, and size/capacity, maybe only about 25-30 or so years, was when 'big' machines, started the great leap forward.

60 years ago the 560 was still in production, the JD 10 series was barely a year old, and IF the 5010 had been introduced it, and maybe the 1900 Oliver would have been the only 100+ HP, NON 4WD tractors on the market.  I believe the largest grain platforms for a combine was either 22 or 24ft (Engine size was right at 100 HP).

And a 40 year old farmer in the '60's undoubtedly had grown up using horses for at least part of the jobs

I like to think my great grandpa saw the greatest change.  He started farming in 1910 and retired in 1969.  To me starting with horses and ending with a 4020 like he did was a bigger change then starting with a Versatile 950 progressing to the JD 9520R I’m driving right now.  

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2 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

I like to think my great grandpa saw the greatest change.  He started farming in 1910 and retired in 1969.  To me starting with horses and ending with a 4020 like he did was a bigger change then starting with a Versatile 950 progressing to the JD 9520R I’m driving right now.  

My grandpa born in 1919 grew up picking corn by hand with a mule pulling the wagon and the last tractor he ever ran was an 8100 Deere we bought new. He never retired. He farmed until he could no longer get out of bed. He lived long enough to hear of auto steer, but never witnessed it first hand. 

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The last couple posts are exactly what I was getting at. Its amazing when you think about how far farming has come in even the last 30 years. 

I don't think these will be in use widespread in five or maybe even ten years but I could be wrong. Look at how far battery technology has come along in the last 20 years.

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Looks like it might be pulling a 10 foot wide tillage implement. 

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Farm magazine had write up of Silicon Valley software designer that went back to help dad farm corn and beans as dad had health issues. Got board driving tractor and wired up tractor and 4 or at most 6 row planter.  His comment was if it runs 24/7 did not need a mega planter. This was pre covid and he had the ear of Deere engineers, this is not a real surprise to me.

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14 hours ago, Cdfarabaugh said:

Honestly I think the future looks very sad and meaningless if one chooses to conform to what will be pushed on us by the tech industry. Millions and millions of people are going to find themselves obsolete replaced in every way by automation and AI.  There will be very  small class of people considered useful such as engineers, techies, a few limited jobs such as doctors that still require in person services, and of COURSE politicians.  The rest?  Probably will be on a universal basic income and live off the government and told to be happy with it.

Unfortunately I dont see much ti change this, progress ALWAYS wins, but as an individual or a family we can choose how much we partake in it with our lifestyle living "off the grid"

I concur.  A couple of years ago I read an article which was about the future of AI replacing humans. One question was how are people going to support their families with less opportunity for employment. article went on to say companies will be paying higher taxes for a universal income. Some people are just fine living with no purpose I would find it extremely boring. 

Currently we are going through the process of updating our spud shed to eliminate people.  17-18 containers that landed on the east coast are headed our way with a new Ellips line which uses cameras/computer/electronics for grading,sizing and sorting.  all of this is due to our State with a high minimum wage (close to $15 hr with a yearly cost of living) and the amount of overtime being paid out (16,000+hours yearly). We will be doing 20-25% more product in a 40 hour week then working 55-60 hours a week with 40 people. rough idea is 13-15 grading ladies gone  but will need more forklift ops. plus box stackers.(robots are next for this task) The farms are bleeding a slow death through increased packing charges so needed to get a handle on labor cost.

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18 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

My grandpa born in 1919 grew up picking corn by hand with a mule pulling the wagon and the last tractor he ever ran was an 8100 Deere we bought new. He never retired. He farmed until he could no longer get out of bed. He lived long enough to hear of auto steer, but never witnessed it first hand. 

My great grandpa died in 76’.  He lived long enough to see us get our first 4 wheel drive tractor and sound insulated cab.  

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