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If you or someone has a picture of tail number, I know someone who to tell you where it ended up.

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25 minutes ago, mmi said:

that was discussed here over the winter.......now finding it...... try RPM

Its a DC3, here is the topic where we were discussing it before. I've not come across any photos showing the tail number.

 

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9 hours ago, acem said:

There are several pics of the plane in the thread but I can't make out the tail numbers.

Me either. The tail numbers for the one Beech D-18's are visible in those photos. 

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It could have ended up at Basler Aviation in Wisconsin for a turbine conversion…that is where they found “That’s all brother”, the first c47 to carry paratroopers over the English Channel before D Day.  The C47 was the military version of the DC3.  Anyway, the N number could clear up what became of the International airplane.

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N24H is the one I am seeing the most in the Harvester World issues.

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9 minutes ago, FarmallFan said:

N24H is the one I am seeing the most in the Harvester World issues.

That number was at one time assigned to a 1951 Beechcraft D18S, de-registered at some point and the number has been since assigned to several different planes. The Beech S/N was A576.

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15 minutes ago, New Englander said:

That number was at one time assigned to a 1951 Beechcraft D18S, de-registered at some point and the number has been since assigned to several different planes. The Beech S/N was A576.

I saw that on the FAA site. But in looking at the this photo that shows the two DC-3's and the D18S's that Harvester had, N24H looks to be DC-3 to me. 

Screen Shot 2022-05-06 at 11.07.26 AM.png

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My best guess on the DC3 is that it was a low time surplus C47 converted to DC3. The B23 that is seems to have replaced was a surplus UC67 or B23. I worked for a company that operated one now residing at the Castle Air museum. The B23 had the same basic wing airfoil and landing gear but having much bigger Wright R2600 engines over the Pratt&Whitney R1830 on the DC3 and a smaller fuselage was quite a bit faster. The DC3 had more passenger room and for the distances flown the speed difference was no big deal.

The B23 had a taller tail to accommodate the bigger engines. Some B23s were later equipped with even higher horsepower variants of the R2600s. Some DC3s had the R2000s from the DC4 installed. I believe the R4Ds the Navy bought had the R2000s and a taller tail.

 

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1 minute ago, FarmallFan said:

I saw that on the FAA site. But in looking at the this photo that shows the two DC-3's and the D18S's that Harvester had, N24H looks to be DC-3 to me. 

For sure a DC3. Records from over a half century ago are kind of thin, to say the least.

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On a related note to the topic, the owner of our IH dealer at the time had his own private airplane and he would fly out parts to you if you needed them ASAP. 

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9 hours ago, New Englander said:

For sure a DC3. Records from over a half century ago are kind of thin, to say the least.

Buffalo Airways has complete records on DC-3's.

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52 minutes ago, KWRB said:

Buffalo Airways has complete records on DC-3's.

On all DC-3's or just the ones they own?

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2 hours ago, FarmallFan said:

On all DC-3's or just the ones they own?

I think they've got data well bring their own. They ID'd someone else's as being a D-Day plane a few years ago. Honestly, if you want to know, give them a call. Ask for Mikey McBryan and just tell him it's a DC-3 and you want to know some info. He's a real great, down to earth guy and if it can be done, **** help you find the info. If they don't have the data, they could tell you how to find out.

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Just reading the forum this am and came across this thread.

I knew I had a picture of a IH plane , can't remember where I got it from. Been in the IH collectable display for many years. Nothing wrote on the back. No idea where it was taken.

If zoom in I can make out N25H on the tail. Sorry for the sideways pic. I used my phone not the camara.

 

Alex.

 

 

20220507_092959.jpg

20220507_093011.jpg

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11 hours ago, Alex uk said:

Just reading the forum this am and came across this thread.

I knew I had a picture of a IH plane , can't remember where I got it from. Been in the IH collectable display for many years. Nothing wrote on the back. No idea where it was taken.

If zoom in I can make out N25H on the tail. Sorry for the sideways pic. I used my phone not the camara.

 

Alex.

 

 

20220507_092959.jpg

20220507_093011.jpg

Google found something for N25H: https://rzjets.net/aircraft/?page=129&typeid=275#:~:text=1943-,N25H,-N287W

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I can only imagine N25H is to the right of it sister in the picture of 4 aircraft posted.

I am sure I have something about the IH aircraft in a IH book, but which one not sure.

Great thread. Maybe we will have to re-vist the IH barge's on the great lakes thread!

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8 hours ago, Howard_P said:

Here's the B-23 that started the IH Aviation Department in 1948.

IH Aviation Department 1, First IH Plane, B-23, the Harold F. McCormick, 1948, Pilot William R. Dotter and Co-Pilot Walter Daiber  (1).jpg

IH Aviation Department 1, First IH Plane, B-23, the Harold F. McCormick, 1948, Pilot William R. Dotter and Co-Pilot Walter Daiber  (3).jpg

IH Aviation Department 1, First IH Plane, B-23, the Harold F. McCormick, 1948, Pilot William R. Dotter and Co-Pilot Walter Daiber  (7).jpg

I hadn't seen the pic with the pilot leaning out the window before. You can see that the glass nose hasn't been replaced like on other B23s, just aluminum "windows" installed. You can clearly see the very long antenna needed for the low frequency radios in use back then. Navigation was by the 4 leg range stations that were followed by listening to the audio. Each side of the leg center line transmitted either an A .- dot dash; or an N -. dash dot. If you were on the center you heard a constant tone. if you heard either an A or an N you were off course left or right. Passing over the station the signal would naturally shift so the A or N would swap sides relative to the centerline. All happily phased out by the time I started training. Even most NDBs or Non Directional Beacons are now gone along with most outer marker compass locators - a low power NDB co-located with the outer marker of an ILS or Instrument landing System. An NDB  is used with an ADF or Automatic Direction Finder. The ADF needle simply points to the station and all the orientation and wind correction is done in the pilot's head. The Marker Beacons themselves are mostly gone as well. The Marker Beacons transmit a signal along the ILS course and can be identified by the tone in the headset - 400 hz for the outer; 1300hz for the middle which corresponds with the 200' Decision Altitude of a CAT I ILS ; and finally the Inner which is modulated at 3000hz and marks the Decision Height of a CAT II ILS at 100'. The marker beacon receiver decodes the signal and will light a blue light for the outer, a amber light for the middle, and a white light for the inner. The 4 leg range stations also used a fan marker to establish where along the course you were and was modulated at 3000hz - a white light. VORs replaced the  4 leg; wide area augmented GPS has pretty much replaced all of it!

Not evident unless you look close but the tailwheel is not on the center-line of the aircraft but rather offset to allow access to the tail gunner's position. In the early '70s I was considerably lighter but just looking at the position on our B23 it became obvious that it was made for a very slim person.

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