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$38.00 organic soybeans


2+2love
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19 minutes ago, midnightman said:

Made me scratch my head when I had an organic farm bring me their fertilizer spin spreader and field sprayer to get some work done on them.

I have a lime spreader and sprayer but I use the sprayer for biologicals and Biodynamics. 

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A local organic farmer is still trying to get last year's beans harvested. He gets taken over by foxtail every year. It was so bad that he couldn't direct cut with the combine, so he swathed it. Then it got wet and snowy.. and it has been a wet early spring.

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2 minutes ago, Farmall Doctor said:

A local organic farmer is still trying to get last year's beans harvested. He gets taken over by foxtail every year. It was so bad that he couldn't direct cut with the combine, so he swathed it. Then it got wet and snowy.. and it has been a wet early spring.

I use a John Deere 653A row crop head to harvest my soybeans. As long as the grass is dry it will cut it fine. 

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Every organic farmer I’ve seen in this area seeded weeds to the rest of the country. 90% of the time you couldn’t tell what crop was planted in the field. Now, I’m not flaming you or the job you do, I’ve seen your pics and appreciate them,  but organic farms don’t have a good reputation everywhere. I mean that respectfully to the OP. The “poison and synthetic fertilizer” are a big reason why (until recently) food was cheap and easy to come by. Everything has a place. 

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5 minutes ago, 2+2love said:

I have a lime spreader and sprayer but I use the sprayer for biologicals and Biodynamics. 

I know that I don’t have a full understanding of organic farming and the requirements, and could use to learn a lot more about it.  (On the spreader though, there’s no lime used on soils here.)

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1 hour ago, midnightman said:

I know that I don’t have a full understanding of organic farming and the requirements, and could use to learn a lot more about it.  (On the spreader though, there’s no lime used on soils here.)

We use white lime, Soft rock phosphate, calicum sulfate and stuff like that. Boron too if our certifier approves it. 

We also spread composted chicken manure with it as well. 

Soil health is something we are always trying to improve. 

We communicate with our certifier a lot. Keeping good records and field work logs too, It's a real pain in the a**.

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It looks like you do good work by the pics I've seen you post.

But $38 soybeans. I'd hold out for $40 then end up with $20...

Best of luck with everything and keep up the good work.

Thx-Ace 

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4 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Every organic farmer I’ve seen in this area seeded weeds to the rest of the country. 90% of the time you couldn’t tell what crop was planted in the field. Now, I’m not flaming you or the job you do, I’ve seen your pics and appreciate them,  but organic farms don’t have a good reputation everywhere. I mean that respectfully to the OP. The “poison and synthetic fertilizer” are a big reason why (until recently) food was cheap and easy to come by. Everything has a place. 

+1.   Im not against organic farming and I’m not degrading the OP because  it looks like the job he does is excellent.  But to call what the rest of us do poisoning the soil is idiotic.  
 

You want to see a Mad Max apocalypse collapse.  Let the UN mandate no chemicals and we all go organic and reduce our food stocks in a growing population to the point there are shortages or the common people can’t afford it.  Look at history. What brings down a government or empire more often then not.  Starving people 

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Congratulations on your good fortune. I hope this means that many years of trials and tribulations are paying off.

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Other than for bio diesel, and animal feed(and this is questionable), soybeans are one of the worst things for humans to eat. Soy should be avoided like the plaque.

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32 minutes ago, Lars (midessa) said:

Other than for bio diesel, and animal feed(and this is questionable), soybeans are one of the worst things for humans to eat. Soy should be avoided like the plaque.

X2 all grains are highly inflammatory to the human body one of the leading causes of arthritis and joint pain.

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Soybeans are used to make cooking oil.

Think how much cooking oil that is produced from all the Soybeans produced in the world.

Man that's alot of fried food!

Thx-Ace 

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On 5/3/2022 at 12:05 PM, midnightman said:

I know that I don’t have a full understanding of organic farming and the requirements, and could use to learn a lot more about it.  (On the spreader though, there’s no lime used on soils here.)

There's a alot of different organic products around that can be spread on or mixed with water and sprayed on. I think every organic farmer I know owns a sprayer for those products. I think the granular to spread on is not quite as common around here, but I know there are a couple products available

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I could see all the bickering and fighting if most farmers were raising crops fit for human consumption. But a heck of a lot of bean and corn production is classed non edible and destined for the gas tank. Keep in mind that American farmers feed about 45% of the world. That about covers India and China. 

I got popcorn on....not sure where it was grown....the butter is US produced.

Rick

 

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3 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

I could see all the bickering and fighting if most farmers were raising crops fit for human consumption. But a heck of a lot of bean and corn production is classed non edible and destined for the gas tank. Keep in mind that American farmers feed about 45% of the world. That about covers India and China. 

I got popcorn on....not sure where it was grown....the butter is US produced.

Rick

 

I was told in the 1990's the popcorn growers said they would never grow gmo popcorn and that is why gmo popcorn is not a thing. 

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23 minutes ago, 2+2love said:

Keep in mind that American farmers feed about 45% of the world

NOT if certain interests have their way, like those 'interests' that want the American farmer to return to using "manure and compost". (Yet, if they succeed in destroying the livestock industry, WHERE is the manure going to come from?)(Perhaps "night soil" will make up the shortfall).

 

 

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54 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

I could see all the bickering and fighting if most farmers were raising crops fit for human consumption. But a heck of a lot of bean and corn production is classed non edible and destined for the gas tank. Keep in mind that American farmers feed about 45% of the world. That about covers India and China. 

I got popcorn on....not sure where it was grown....the butter is US produced.

Rick

 

There is a lot of feed that comes out of the ethanol plant. Putting corn in the gas tank is just one part of the process. We feed a lot of distillers grain and spray corn syrup on the silage pile as well. 

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Going organic is not an overnight process. You can't just spray roundup in 2021 and not in 2022 and get organic money. There's a certification process that is years long as I understand it.

How does one financially survive the ensuing years selling reduced organic yields at conventional prices? In fact the yields are reduced even more than normal because the new organic farmer doesn't know all the tricks of the trade.

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24 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Going organic is not an overnight process. You can't just spray roundup in 2021 and not in 2022 and get organic money. There's a certification process that is years long as I understand it.

How does one financially survive the ensuing years selling reduced organic yields at conventional prices? In fact the yields are reduced even more than normal because the new organic farmer doesn't know all the tricks of the trade.

3 years. 

We are on our 24th year of certification.

We plant alfalfa and orchard grass. In that time we take care of the soil and give it lots of inputs. When we aquire new ground. 

Individually wrapped round bales.High quality dairy hay organic or not sells at a premium. Everyone prefers individual wrapped when you have to truck it. 

In 2010 our farm won grand champion hay sample in the world's forage Superbowl at the world's dairy expo. We have won may places in the forage Superbowl for many years. 

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25 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Going organic is not an overnight process. You can't just spray roundup in 2021 and not in 2022 and get organic money. There's a certification process that is years long as I understand it.

How does one financially survive the ensuing years selling reduced organic yields at conventional prices? In fact the yields are reduced even more than normal because the new organic farmer doesn't know all the tricks of the trade.

  Has to be done on very productive soils.  Around here that would mean Honeoye, Ontario, Lima, Hilton, and Cazenovia soil classes typically.  Those soils run to the high end of the production range in conventional because excess water can perk down readily naturally or with the aid of tile if needed, roots can reach down into the soil many inches in dry weather, and nutrients are distributed wide to great availability.  Soil that runs shallow in the topsoil layer, slow movement of water either down to drain or up to reach roots, and has low pH does not work well for organics.  Lets face it the first three years that you get organic yields and conventional prices is tough never mind a poor growing season due to weather.  

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On 5/3/2022 at 7:55 AM, 2+2love said:

I have a lime spreader and sprayer but I use the sprayer for biologicals and Biodynamics. 

IMG_20220417_094152.jpg

IMG_20220417_103951.jpg

What's the story with the waterfall going into the kiddie pool?

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