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5 hours ago, 401 N Michigan said:

952C6D40-DE0A-46CB-BDE7-8F0ABDAE4D68.jpeg

I should add, thanks for posting this. For all the information that's out there to be consumed in print and electronic form, I don't think I've ever seen this. If I have, I don't remember.

Cheers guys!!

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12 hours ago, hillman said:

it is no longer  a man on the tractor unless it has a flat tire or a broken axle🤣

It’s the hillside model 😂

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10 hours ago, Binderoid said:

And everyone was worried about flinging insults in the coffee shop. Did an out-of-frame overhaul, and we’re still getting water in the oil 

We must have used the Reliance overhaul kit, that’s why it didn’t work. 

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0965fadd1e3ffb20638b278656c3c744--anchorman-quotes-movie-lines.jpg

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2 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

0965fadd1e3ffb20638b278656c3c744--anchorman-quotes-movie-lines.jpg

cmon now everyone sing together - sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet caroline - ba ba baaaaaaaaaaaaaa good times never felt so good so good so good 

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19 minutes ago, TriStripe1086 said:

I just noticed where the "H" intersects the "i", two of the crossbar corners are radiused and two are square, on opposite corners from each other.

It's called a "wordmark"  special fonts with little touches like that to identify your brand.  Brand names are never common fonts/styles....it helps protect and set off the OEM.

 

 

I don't mind the radiused corners of the final IH.....and am THANKFUL that ANY version of it survives today on RED tractors.  Say what you want, but 35 years later tractors are still red and still carry an (updated) man on the tractor logo.....the IH legacy did ok.....

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1BB7C831-AAFD-4146-B71F-1BE4C99D794B.thumb.jpeg.4fa16bea70412a70102b1efcfb058599.jpeg93737820-6A10-4C39-9BEC-D0303B2461F1.thumb.jpeg.3d2ce21cdbfbef0c5849da2e23fec71a.jpegI thought this was interesting. Behind an aggressive company is a strong logo. 
Over the years I’ve read A Corporate Tragedy 3 times….been to the grounds of a closed down and mostly torn down Rock Island plant, toured East Moline when it was open. I’ve been to 401 N Michigan Ave numerous times when traveling to Chicago. As a child I dreamed up a plan where Navistar would buy back the tractors and make the 88 series in Chicago next to the trucks. 
I hated it when this IH logo was discontinued for the “angled” ih in 1995. So much I wrote the company a letter..(it’s posted somewhere on here) But if IH had continued and still existed they would have updated the logo to something sexier and new. 
Now I just prefer to live like it’s 1985, I buy old trucks and tractors and enjoy life. 

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19 hours ago, billonthefarm said:

I actually like this logo!

I am confident we can put our differences behind us  🥰 👍:D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I prefer traditional things but nothing stays the same.

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I'm offended.

As a former engineer, the logo is not a work of an engineering department.

Logos are the work of the marketing department. 

Logos are designed by marketing with the assistance of a graphic artist and possibly a draftsman borrowed from engineering.

Engineers despise salesmen (marketing department) for coming up with all kinds of frivolous pie in the sky crap that we have to try to make work.

 

 

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I'm sure I don't have it anymore, although my Dad probably does somewhere.  But shortly after the acquisition by Tenneco my Dad had a picture of the Case Chicken Hawk that had an IH logo under it's wing and the JD deer in it's talons.  Obviously it didn't work out quite that well but it was a pretty funny picture anyway.

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9 hours ago, redturbo said:

 Wish people would say caseIH instead of case.  People don’t say my John is broken

.... question or correct them. "case" branded products are pre-1985 or are construction equipment.  "will the case dealer have parts in stock for my Farmall M"? ... "No, because they only carry construction equipment parts. You should see the case IH dealer".   or "Do you have any parts for a case combine?" "No, I haven't seen one of those relics in years!!".

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I'm glad Tennaco bought cih. 

Tennaco and the later owners have at least tried to maintain parts support and brand recognition. Think about the parts support for many other brands that have been 'merged'. 

If fiat would have bought Navistar instead of Volkswagen it would have been better. Most of the old IH would be back under the same ownership!

If nobody would have bought out the ag division of IH they would have gone bankrupt. At least Tennaco had deep pockets to make it through the 80s. 

IMHO YMMV

Thx-Ace 

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1 hour ago, acem said:

I'm glad Tennaco bought cih. 

Tennaco and the later owners have at least tried to maintain parts support and brand recognition. Think about the parts support for many other brands that have been 'merged'. 

If fiat would have bought Navistar instead of Volkswagen it would have been better. Most of the old IH would be back under the same ownership!

If nobody would have bought out the ag division of IH they would have gone bankrupt. At least Tennaco had deep pockets to make it through the 80s. 

IMHO YMMV

Thx-Ace 

Yes, there was no way to recover the income lost by the strike during the deep recession of the early 1980's.  Companies like JD contracted out work to keep factories running.  I don't know exact production but if serial numbers are an indicator JD's production fell off steeply by the time the 50 series came out in 1983.  There really was no place to go for any extra production to go if made during those years.  As it was inventory backed up into the following model year in many dealerships.  An area IH dealer here took on a second location in early 1983 which was closed by Case IH in both locations in 1985 when Case IH was figuring out its dealer network.  The one bright spot for those immediately closed was a payout of 250,000 dollars per location which some used to reinvent themselves as Ford NH dealers.  Others wished that they were closed as their costs on inventory were on par with the selling price of the big multiple location Case IH dealer here.  Case IH was pretty much down to multi-location dealers by the early 1990's in this region.  

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2 hours ago, acem said:

I'm glad Tennaco bought cih. 

Tennaco and the later owners have at least tried to maintain parts support and brand recognition. Think about the parts support for many other brands that have been 'merged'. 

If fiat would have bought Navistar instead of Volkswagen it would have been better. Most of the old IH would be back under the same ownership!

If nobody would have bought out the ag division of IH they would have gone bankrupt. At least Tennaco had deep pockets to make it through the 80s. 

IMHO YMMV

Thx-Ace 

I consider the Case name being added to IH a very very small sacrifice considering that a lot of the IH lineup continued after the merger.  Some guys loose sight of that.  AF combines, planters, drills, tillage continued on.  Even the big rowcrop tractors after a 2 year hiatus.  So what if they had the CDC engine.  Rest was still IH.  About the only thing lost was the hay equipment????  And if so that wasn't a big deal.  

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1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

I consider the Case name being added to IH a very very small sacrifice considering that a lot of the IH lineup continued after the merger.  Some guys loose sight of that.  AF combines, planters, drills, tillage continued on.  Even the big rowcrop tractors after a 2 year hiatus.  So what if they had the CDC engine.  Rest was still IH.  About the only thing lost was the hay equipment????  And if so that wasn't a big deal.  

This IS true, first look at all the re-inventions of the John Deere logo over the years, and second, look at the equipment that John Deere has either dropped completely, OR, now sells under the Frontier brand name, because of a limited market, or because the machines are too small to fit in the sales segment of the larger John Deere branded equipment.

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4 hours ago, acem said:

Tennaco and the later owners have at least tried to maintain parts support

I don’t personally think they are doing a very good job with parts support lately. I think there are way too many parts that you can’t get anymore. Especially for what they consider “legacy” equipment. 

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I understand because all my tractors are international, not caseih. But remember they stopped making international tractors in 85? That was 37 years ago.

Go to a Chevy, Ford or Dodge dealer and ask for parts for your 85 model sedan. Let alone a 75 or 65 model sedan!

Thx-Ace 

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On 4/1/2022 at 4:17 PM, acem said:

I'm glad Tennaco bought cih. 

Tennaco and the later owners have at least tried to maintain parts support and brand recognition. Think about the parts support for many other brands that have been 'merged'. 

If fiat would have bought Navistar instead of Volkswagen it would have been better. Most of the old IH would be back under the same ownership!

If nobody would have bought out the ag division of IH they would have gone bankrupt. At least Tennaco had deep pockets to make it through the 80s. 

IMHO YMMV

Thx-Ace 

 

On 4/1/2022 at 9:40 PM, acem said:

I understand because all my tractors are international, not caseih. But remember they stopped making international tractors in 85? That was 37 years ago.

Go to a Chevy, Ford or Dodge dealer and ask for parts for your 85 model sedan. Let alone a 75 or 65 model sedan!

Thx-Ace 

Agree with most of this statement .

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On 4/1/2022 at 5:52 PM, 766 Man said:

Yes, there was no way to recover the income lost by the strike during the deep recession of the early 1980's.  Companies like JD contracted out work to keep factories running.  I don't know exact production but if serial numbers are an indicator JD's production fell off steeply by the time the 50 series came out in 1983.  There really was no place to go for any extra production to go if made during those years.  As it was inventory backed up into the following model year in many dealerships.  An area IH dealer here took on a second location in early 1983 which was closed by Case IH in both locations in 1985 when Case IH was figuring out its dealer network.  The one bright spot for those immediately closed was a payout of 250,000 dollars per location which some used to reinvent themselves as Ford NH dealers.  Others wished that they were closed as their costs on inventory were on par with the selling price of the big multiple location Case IH dealer here.  Case IH was pretty much down to multi-location dealers by the early 1990's in this region.  

About half of this is correct. Dealers did not get $250,000. It was like $10,000 and they bought back the stock. IH did not sell their dealers to Tenneco, IH gave Tenneco access to their dealers. Tenneco didn’t have to keep any of them,  but of course they did keep a lot of them.  Read this dealers law suit 

 

https://law.justia.com/cases/south-dakota/supreme-court/1987/15329-1.html

 

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1 hour ago, 401 N Michigan said:

About half of this is correct. Dealers did not get $250,000. It was like $10,000 and they bought back the stock. IH did not sell their dealers to Tenneco, IH gave Tenneco access to their dealers. Tenneco didn’t have to keep any of them,  but of course they did keep a lot of them.  Read this dealers law suit 

 

https://law.justia.com/cases/south-dakota/supreme-court/1987/15329-1.html

 

  Based on what I was told most of what you say does not add up.  250,000 dollars per location was what was reported in The Wall Street Journal as the merger was being consummated in late 1984.  I never said that IH sold their dealers to Tenneco.  Yes, Tenneco could have started from scratch in terms of the dealer network.  I don't know exactly when the ax started falling to appreciate what may have happened with a given dealer.  IH giving access really was meaningless in the scheme of things.  Had the merger not happened those dealers would have been out of business plain and simple.  

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