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TB5288
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""Break-in oil""

Does anyone really know if this is a thing? Can you prove it other than the label says that it is?

As far as the first oil change, I run the oil I'm always going to use and change it at about halfway to a normal oil change interval.

Travis

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I would say this is a fairly good explanation of break in and what break in oils need to facilitate.  Basically break in is basically the last machining pass on new mating parts.  

 

https://blog.amsoil.com/why-you-should-be-wary-about-using-break-in-oil-in-powersports-equipment/

 

New from factory engines at least in some cases (maybe always) get a special break in process before the engine is sent out.  Often the engine is spun with outside power for a time, then is fired up and run under controlled conditions for a time. I don’t do many overhauls but I WILL NOT let an rebuilt engine out of my hands without the preliminary break in processes.  I don’t use a special break in oil but depending on the circumstances I might use a different (usually lighter) oil than what would be normally used.

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I use JD break-in oil and had excellent results I usually run it at least 100 hrs before going back to oil that it will stay with

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I don't know anything about break in oil, never used any. I overhauled am 8.3 on a 8950. Seem to be having a tough time getting rings seated. Appears to still have quite a bit of blow by, and it's steady, no puff. I haven't checked it with manometer, just going by looks and feel. Got about 75 hours on it now and I wasn't sure if break in oil would make a difference anymore. I don't expect it to be broke in at 75 hours, just haven't seen much of a change is why I'm asking. First few hours after rebuild were on dyno, since then it's been inconsistent loads. I'm sure a good steady pull for a few days would do wonders but I haven't had that opportunity yet.

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8 hours ago, TB5288 said:

I don't know anything about break in oil, never used any. I overhauled am 8.3 on a 8950. Seem to be having a tough time getting rings seated. Appears to still have quite a bit of blow by, and it's steady, no puff. I haven't checked it with manometer, just going by looks and feel. Got about 75 hours on it now and I wasn't sure if break in oil would make a difference anymore. I don't expect it to be broke in at 75 hours, just haven't seen much of a change is why I'm asking. First few hours after rebuild were on dyno, since then it's been inconsistent loads. I'm sure a good steady pull for a few days would do wonders but I haven't had that opportunity yet.

Appears to me you've done about all you could with what you have. At this point I would dump the oil and try the break in oil and run it like it was a red headed step child. It will either help or not. The alternative is to pull it down and replace the rings, break the glaze and use the break in oil from the get go if it doesn't clear up. Some people used to use bon ami through the air intake to make them seat but I wouldn't. 

The problem is some of these chrome moly rings are ridiculously hard and just won't seat any other way. Not always but still often enough to warrant the break in oil. The cheaper rings and cast iron ones seat easier. JMO

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For the $64,000 question: What break in oil do you use?

Does Viscosity or Shell market such a product, meant for heavy duty engines?

I can't imagine you're using Royal Purple 10W30 break-in oil at $9/quart.

"Break-In Oil combines highly refined mineral oil (preferred for engine break-in) with an advanced additive package containing elevated levels of zinc/phosphorus anti-wear additive to optimize wear protection during the sensitive engine break-in phase. "

Seems opposite of what you'd want in a break-in oil to me. You want the rings to wear quickly at the beginning and seat. Then you can anti-wear your brains out if you want...

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My theory on break in was to run an engine to get it warmed up, then re-torque the head, reset the valves and fix any leaks.

It then went on the dyno for an hour at full power.

The owner was then told to use it like a rented mule.

Don't abuse it but use the engine like it was intended.

If you can tie it to a plow or something that will make the governor open up, do so.

Do not baby it!

What you are trying to do is to force the rings out, using compression, to seat the rings to the cylinders.

I always used the oil that will be used in the future and had them dump it and filters at 10 hours of use.

If on the right tillage tool, that can come very quick.

Then do your normal oil changes thereafter.

I had the opportunity to break in about a dozen patrol cars over the years.

I would take them out, usually at night, and be sure they are up to temperature.

Then stand on the gas until they would go no faster.

Then back off on the gas to legal speed for about 10 miles.

They are cooling back down.

Then do it again for a total of three times.

Afterward you have an engine that will not use oil and will also be the fastest.

 

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The one thing that worries me using the "oil you would normally use" is that theres a lot if synthetic blend oils out there now, and its universally agree upon that synthetic oil is a no go for break in.  

One other point I find is that theres 2 different goals when breaking an  engine in.  A lot of automotive break in oils are more concerned with flat taper camshaft break in and the ZDDP needed to protect  those components. In the diesel world we are more worried with rings seating properly.  

I use the Deere break in oil, only stuff I see made for what we want to accomplish that I see, reasonably priced, and never had an oil burner or slobberer after using it.  

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I guess I'm curious. The diesels still have flat tappet cams as well correct? Or does the newer stuff have roller cams like the gas engines? My point is wouldn't you still be concerned about cam wear in any engine with flat tappets? I understand we want the rings to seat but I would think the cam wear would be of equal concern?

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I tell customers to run it 100 hours, and top off with only break in oil as well. I know several who run new machines out to 200-250 hours with it, and never develop any problems. Most base engine assembly failures I see are from power boxes/hot rod software, or pumps turned up too much.

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You don’t want any oil in a rebuilt engine for more than 10 hours, no matter how “clean” your build is a lot of contamination gets in along with sealers and dust. Run it a little and dump, run next batch to 50 hours then your normal program. 

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On 3/18/2022 at 10:30 AM, Diesel Doctor said:

My theory on break in was to run an engine to get it warmed up, then re-torque the head, reset the valves and fix any leaks.

It then went on the dyno for an hour at full power.

The owner was then told to use it like a rented mule.

Don't abuse it but use the engine like it was intended.

If you can tie it to a plow or something that will make the governor open up, do so.

Do not baby it!

What you are trying to do is to force the rings out, using compression, to seat the rings to the cylinders.

I always used the oil that will be used in the future and had them dump it and filters at 10 hours of use.

If on the right tillage tool, that can come very quick.

Then do your normal oil changes thereafter.

I had the opportunity to break in about a dozen patrol cars over the years.

I would take them out, usually at night, and be sure they are up to temperature.

Then stand on the gas until they would go no faster.

Then back off on the gas to legal speed for about 10 miles.

They are cooling back down.

Then do it again for a total of three times.

Afterward you have an engine that will not use oil and will also be the fastest.

 

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