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When You Live In That "Magical Land" Where The Climate Is "Just Right", There Is No Need For


Art From Coleman
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The newer vehicle's generally have better initial quality than cars made in the 70s, the low point of American quality control in the automotive industry. The engines will also last more miles on average than back then. However those numbers are skewed by soft blocks in chevys and plastic timing gears in chrysler products. 

Modern vehicles lack long term durability due to complex electronics and the related wiring. I live in the south, no rust, so I can run a vehicle seemingly forever. Time is much more forgiving on pre computer vehicles. 

I still drive first gen dodge cummins trucks. My nice truck is a 93 with 250,000 and in great shape. My farm truck has over 600,000 and is still reliable but the body is terribly loose. Pick-ups aren't designed to live over a half a million miles! My wife drives a 93 geo metro xfi with almost 200,000 miles. These were chosen for fuel economy and reliability.

I drive two loadstar 1600s with 345. The 75 has almost 200,000 miles and the motor is still great. I'm rebuilding the brakes now. The 74 has over 250,00 and still runs OK but the motor is terribly loose. Both still get points every year or so. My 71 c60 366 has a little over 100,000 miles and is OK but worn.

I have numerous other vehicles and engines still running on the farm from back in the day.

Well made gas engines from back in the day or today can last 250,000 miles. A 70s small block chevy or 00s 6.0 Ford won't.

Everybody complains about the new gas but i love it. My spark plugs last forever with the new gas- fuel injection, points, electronic ignition, carburetor it's all the same. Back in the day I was lucky to get a year out of them. I don't have problems with carbon buildup in the engines anymore either.

Thx-Ace 

 

 

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I used to say I don't want any of that electronic bs, give me old school simple.

I had an 86 f150 that had a 300 six cylinder with the goofy electric controlled carburetor. That truck never ran good. I found a 351 Windsor with a factory four barrel carb setup in a junkyard and did a swap. I went with a manual choke and almost went with a points distributor but the guy helping me talked me out of it. The truck was a blast to drive but with the manual choke I just couldn't go out and start it and leave it warm up. I had to babysit it, might have had something to do with the cam I put in it when I did the swap. Either way when I quit driving it and got my next truck it was so nice to be able to start it on a cold day and leave it warm up.

Just a side note, I quit driving the ford when gas hit $2.00 a gallon. I figured with those prices and my heavy foot I couldn't afford to drive it. A 351 Windsor with a four barrel, long tube headers, glass packs and a mild cam was a fun truck to drive and I did have a blast with it.

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13 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

I remember looking at a new 1987-88 Ford pickup at the dealer in Kalkaska, MI, that did not have air conditioning.

Bought a new 1995 Chevy K1500 off lot that did not have AC.  Drove it everyday for 17 years.  Great truck.  17500 brand new including tax.

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My wife's geo metro don't have AC. It's super rare to see a car here without AC since the late 60s. The car was sold new in Indiana but came south with RVers. 

I haven't seen any other cars round here without AC after 80.

Vehicles with throttle body injection can be pretty simple and reliable.

Thx-Ace 

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16 hours ago, iowaboy1965 said:

There have been many an in tank electric fuel pump that quit and left folks stranded by the road , parking lot ect. 

Our Dodge  Intrepid wouldn't start in below zero weather when nearly new. It had to be towed.

Know a guy who replaced wheel bearings in his wife's car in the Orielys parking lot while on a road trip several hours from home. 

Careful with your rose colored glasses. They all break. 😉

7 times in my case with my 97 half ton.

 

17 hours ago, jass1660 said:

See this post....

 

I’ve driven my share of beaters. My 98 wrangler has been by far the most reliable vehicle i have ever owned.

its an expectation thing too, when the power wagon dies beside the road I expected it to happen, and am surprised when it doesn’t, when my 95 1 ton dies beside the road, i shrug my shoulders and call for a ride, then come on here to pick everyone’s brain, consult my manual and maybe lurk around in the diesel forums , if my new super duper clean burning fancy emissions  diesel that i had many tens of thousands tied up in died beside the road, then id be pi$$ed and you can bet I would be b!tching. 

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17 hours ago, N S said:

Why yes Matt I HAD to fix it. But at least I could fix it. Unlike those today where you need a computer to tell you what needs fixing and then a 3 year tech degree to decipher the codes and an electronics degree to replace the broken relays. and al it was w to begin with was a loose belt causing overheating, which gave the puter convulsions.

Doesn't the not HAVING to fix it outweigh the not being able to fix it?

If it's not breaking down on you all the time why do you feel you need to be able to fix it? You don't fix what isn't broken.

Besides, with a $40 code scanner and the Internet, 95% of the second half of your statement here goes away.

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5 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Doesn't the not HAVING to fix it outweigh the not being able to fix it?

If it's not breaking down on you all the time why do you feel you need to be able to fix it? You don't fix what isn't broken.

Besides, with a $40 code scanner and the Internet, 95% of the second half of your statement here goes away.

Much truth in your statement Matt. Guess when it comes down to it, like you have your things you like fiddling with, whatever they are, I'm kinda a gear head and like fiddling with machinery of all types. If I got machinery that doesn't at least need some sort of maintenance or fiddling with, I don't have much to do. Which leaves to much time spent in bars, hanging on the street, conversing with the wrong crowd, associating with more "sewer" related interests. In short, I get bored. But to top it off, without all that fixing and fiddling, and tinkering, we wouldn't have the high tech stuff we have now. Remember the progress in the automotive industry as a whole was driven primarily by the moonshiners and infant racing crowd and still is, although not the shiners so much anymore. Innovation is driven to a large degree by someones needs. But whaddaheyeknow! 🙃

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Well Matt maybe just my wife's personality but she drove a 1980 Chevy Malibu that had electric issues. Just before code readers. Nobody ever figured it out, bought her the one and only new car she ever got. But that Chevy died and stayed dead until towed 3 times, but always started for the mechanic. But it could be doing 70 down the highway or 5 on a dirt road. Then we had 87 Dodge Dakota that started the die when ever where ever. But that one gave a code and one try fixed it. But the last was a 07 Chrysler Pacifica. First time was out in the country. Just minutes latter it started right up for me, but took to guy in town nothing in the codes. It had one peculiarity, it started as you let off of turning the key. Mechanic took a chance that changing the switch out might do. It did start more normally, but still died in at a stop light. In several try's it started. But after no code again I was told it was gone. She would never drive it again.  I had to sell it to the junk yard at 160,000 and a new transmission at 130,000. As she put not on her if it killed someone by dying on the highway. 

 

So for miles driven my 70's and 80's pickups have given me no more trouble than newr ones. Something tells me a 2020 electronic marvel will be just as apt to cause trouble at 40+ years as my 75 Loadstar  1700 is today (the oldest using truck on the ranch today).   

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