Jump to content

5288 money pit.


nate

Recommended Posts

13 hours ago, nate said:

We went by what the IH service manual said, using the dyno   Right or wrong I have no idea….

The best way is to hook them to a plow, or the sort, and work it.

Don't abuse it but work it.

Got to push those new rings out against the sleeves and get the high spots worn off. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Diesel Doctor said:

The best way is to hook them to a plow, or the sort, and work it.

Don't abuse it but work it.

Got to push those new rings out against the sleeves and get the high spots worn off. 

How is this better than a dyno? Not arguing anything, just asking. I could always apply a way more consistent load with a dyno than anything being pulled. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/6/2023 at 10:06 AM, TB5288 said:

How is this better than a dyno? Not arguing anything, just asking. I could always apply a way more consistent load with a dyno than anything being pulled. 

 

On 6/6/2023 at 8:33 AM, Diesel Doctor said:

The best way is to hook them to a plow, or the sort, and work it.

Don't abuse it but work it.

Got to push those new rings out against the sleeves and get the high spots worn off. 

I've always been told to vary the load and RPM to break it in. Important to run a heavy enough load to do it properly 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A newly overhauled engine will do two things during it’s initial few hours of running: 1) generate more heat (rougher internal surfaces) and 2) generate more metal particles (as the rough surfaces wear down).  The first minutes - hour are the worst. During that time it is critical not to do anything to aggravate those conditions.  Once the initial roughness of the parts has gone away, then it is time to put heavier loads on the engines to increase the pressures on the mating surfaces, the rings and cylinders in particular, to complete the wearing in.  Cummins was adamant that in the first 100 hours of operation after overhaul that the engine should not be loaded over 75%.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Break in oil used to be almost universal but now seems rather rare, although it's been a while since I was around much of anything brand new in farm equipment with an engine. The last time we had anything around here with break in oil was an overhauled 4450 Deere after the water pump crashed and dumped the cooling system into the crankcase like they seem to do. The fresh overhaul had break in oil you were supposed to run for a specified number of hours and hard loading and excessive idling were both discouraged during that period.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/7/2023 at 3:11 PM, bitty said:

 

I've always been told to vary the load and RPM to break it in. Important to run a heavy enough load to do it properly 

Ok, even for that. Why would a dyno still not be the best option? I get it, a lot of times a dyno is not possible because there isn't one available, so the only way to put it under a load is with an implement. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, TB5288 said:

Ok, even for that. Why would a dyno still not be the best option? I get it, a lot of times a dyno is not possible because there isn't one available, so the only way to put it under a load is with an implement. 

It would be awesome for break in time . I would like to eventually get one . Need a big enough one for it to work is all 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/8/2023 at 2:09 PM, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

don’t know how much run time a new combine would have on the engine before the customer actually receives it.

As far as I know all new engines have some run time on them before they are even installed.  How much I don’t know.  I do know that in a factory setting, the initial run in can be pretty intricately controlled.  There is a picture somewhere in the world of some IH engine factory with a room full of engines being run in.  Initially the engines were coupled to an electric dynamometer and the dyno spun the engine.  After X amount of time that way, the engine was fired up and allowed to run at no load for X amount of time.  Then a load was placed on the engine by the dynamometer and that was increased over time until initial break in was considered complete. It was pointed out that the engines under load by the dynos were producing the power needed to drive engines just coupled to the dyno and not fired up yet.  From an electrical point of view it was a net zero energy proposition.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Usually how I do a break in is run engine at progressively higher throttle until i can verify thermostat opens.  crap down and check/remedy leaks.  Next startup bring up to temperature again and begin progressively loading the engine in 25% load intervals for 5-10 minutes until full rated load is reached, run it there a bit then back progressively back down again.  Usually do that twice, let everything cool off and call it good.  

I try to use break in oil too.  So much oil out there is synthetic blend anymore may as well just buy the right stuff.   

Personally with manufacturing technology now I think that the process is much more forgiving as cylinder wall finish and piston rings have improved.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

My brother added some mirrors the other day,   Got the suit case weights painted finally, and decided to get it cleaned up and go pull at the county fair.   He got 2nd!   Would post a video if I could figure out how to.  

5E264F4D-7109-43CE-9359-DBC37095561A.jpeg

87867AF7-9B3D-4875-8DD9-7C55C12AE895.jpeg

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, nate said:

Would post a video if I could figure out how to.  

Best way is to upload it to youtube and link to here.  I won’t criticize you if you don’t want to do that.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...