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Limb Hatchet


KWRB
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1 hour ago, Mudfly said:

You need one of these for the back of a wheeler.  Fits 2 saws easily, along with 2.5 gallons of gas, gallon of oil, wedges, chain, sharpening kit, etc.  I also put straps on the back for splitting mail and axe. 3rd saw goes on the front rack if needed.  Can still have myself and 2 kids, or wife and I on the wheeler.  Plus it’s only 2 wd, so the extra weight on the back doesn’t hurt.

Sorry to hi-jack thread.

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Harbor freight has a cheap electric 12 foot reach 9 inch chain polesaw that has served me well for the past 3 years. It's chain oiling is messy. When in the outback I use an inverter in the truck.   I like a loper cutter for smaller branches I can reach, also have a name brand all metal hatchet.  The chain on the end of a stick is the trick because I am way past climbing trees!!!

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You guys may think it's nuts, but I use my pole pruner/saw quite a bit to limb trees on the ground. You can reach the branches and cut them off while standing beyond the limbs so that you are not climbing over or through the brush. 

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I like axes and hatchets if you haven’t noticed.....  An Estwing camp axe lives in my truck toolbox 24/7/365. Got a small fiskars hatchet that is really nice for the money. First pic is a hand made small hatchet that works good for clearing small stuff. Second on in pics is a Gransfors Bruk. Probably won’t find a nicer commercially made axe/hatchet anywhere in my opinion. It is a “small forest axe”.  Marks on the spine are 2” increments so it can be used for measuring in the woods. 

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11 hours ago, lorenzo said:

Get yourself one of these catalogs. Over 830 pages of stuff related to cutting wood. You wont believe what all is in here.F9177830-56C4-48DA-825D-46B3E96642DB.thumb.jpeg.f7ef905a4099d7203c58b039a9d01cfd.jpeg

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Not to mention all the other cool stuff ! Used to look forward to Forestry Suppliers, Ben Meadows, and Bailey's catalogs! A. M. Leonard' s is great for landscaping tools also.

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19 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

I like axes and hatchets if you haven’t noticed.....  An Estwing camp axe lives in my truck toolbox 24/7/365. Got a small fiskars hatchet that is really nice for the money. First pic is a hand made small hatchet that works good for clearing small stuff. Second on in pics is a Gransfors Bruk. Probably won’t find a nicer commercially made axe/hatchet anywhere in my opinion. It is a “small forest axe”.  Marks on the spine are 2” increments so it can be used for measuring in the woods. 

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I always wanted one of those, couldn’t justify it

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38 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

I always wanted one of those, couldn’t justify it

I couldn’t either but it’s little brother got lonely....

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On 2/9/2022 at 7:29 AM, KWRB said:

Do you use a hatchet at all for small limbs? If so,

I have found myself using lopping shears more than a hatchet (still take one).

Easy to carry and will cut a pretty big limb (2") safely and easily. I have cut bigger by rocking it around like a pipe cutter.

Works great for cutting a hole to drive 4 wheeler through.

Wife nicknamed mine Cindy Loppers..........................😄

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On 2/10/2022 at 10:47 AM, Art From Coleman said:

BTW, if you are needing good garden/lawn care tools, look no further than Rouge Hoes, made in Kabool, MO.

Those hoes are by far the best I ever used. Back when we raised tobacco they were the only ones we used. They are made out of old disc blades. I will confess though, once they started disappearing with my help, I went and got some scrap blades out of my pile and copied the design. They’re cheaper that way. 

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On 2/9/2022 at 4:52 PM, vtfireman85 said:

I have a Fiskars hatchet, i really really love it. 

X3 ... If you decide to go with a hatchet you won't go wrong with a Fiskars... high quality ..

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19 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

I couldn’t either but it’s little brother got lonely....

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Since I know you can forge and make tools/hammers, how hard do you think it would be to make a copy of one of the Granfors Bruk axe heads?

as mentioned I either carry a Husqvarna branded hand forged axe or a Hults Bruk.  I’d love to be able to make my own axes, but no time to teach myself, and no one to learn from.  Also too many other irons in the fire to have actual iron in the fire.

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20 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

I couldn’t either but it’s little brother got lonely....

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Just the thing for practicing frontier style medicine, a la "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman", or "Little House on the Prairie" and possibly even up to the days of "The Waltons"

Amputation of a finger, One chicken, or one boot full of walnuts

Amputation of either leg, Five chickens, or Two geese, or ONE large hog.

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3 hours ago, Mudfly said:

Since I know you can forge and make tools/hammers, how hard do you think it would be to make a copy of one of the Granfors Bruk axe heads?

as mentioned I either carry a Husqvarna branded hand forged axe or a Hults Bruk.  I’d love to be able to make my own axes, but no time to teach myself, and no one to learn from.  Also too many other irons in the fire to have actual iron in the fire.

It would take some time but could be done. With hand tools the cheeks are the hardest thing to make. That is the area that touches the handle. Those heads are all drifted through solid blocks of steel. That is the strongest way to make an axe/hatchet. I’ve got the drift already and actually made the hatchet head below myself. It takes time to keep it all straight. If I wanted an end of the world axe I would make one from a tool steel.  The one I made was mild steel with a forge welded bit of high carbon to take a good edge. Lots of styles out there. Some of the early woodsmen writers even carried small double bit hatchets like the bottom pic and had a fine blade for game processing and a more course side for firewood prep. 
 

     Husqvarna and Hults Bruk are both very high end makers today similar to the Gransfors Bruk. Nothing wrong with either brand at all. Everyone has their own idea of “ideal” size/weight.  I’ve always liked the Hudson Bay pattern like the 4th pic.  Ideal, do anything weight would probably be around 2.5lbs head with a 22-24” handle in my opinion.  That would be 3.5-4lb total with handle probably.

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2 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

It would take some time but could be done. With hand tools the cheeks are the hardest thing to make. That is the area that touches the handle. Those heads are all drifted through solid blocks of steel. That is the strongest way to make an axe/hatchet. I’ve got the drift already and actually made the hatchet head below myself. It takes time to keep it all straight. If I wanted an end of the world axe I would make one from a tool steel.  The one I made was mild steel with a forge welded bit of high carbon to take a good edge. Lots of styles out there. Some of the early woodsmen writers even carried small double bit hatchets like the bottom pic and had a fine blade for game processing and a more course side for firewood prep. 
 

     Husqvarna and Hults Bruk are both very high end makers today similar to the Gransfors Bruk. Nothing wrong with either brand at all. Everyone has their own idea of “ideal” size/weight.  I’ve always liked the Hudson Bay pattern like the 4th pic.  Ideal, do anything weight would probably be around 2.5lbs head with a 22-24” handle in my opinion.  That would be 3.5-4lb total with handle probably.

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Here is my Hults.

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Not many swings on it yet.  

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Well, since you all showed yours, guess I'll show mine.

The one on the left is a Gerber, made by Fiskars.  Used to carry it backpacking.  Now if splits kindling for the stove.  Nice and light, but too small to limb with.  Had it a long time.

Middle one is a Wetterlings.  Supposed to be a good one.  All I've done with it is split kindling.  I carried it a little bit backpacking,  but the Gerber (Fiskars) is lighter and has a longer handle.

One on the right is obviously an Eastwing.  I've used it when we've cut timber to mark log lengths and then remove the bark at the cut before cutting them into logs (saves chains).  It works decent for limbing small stuff.  It is too small to drive felling wedges, though.  So I still carry a 2.5 lb axe with full length handle for driving wedges.  I used to carry the Eastwing in my toolbox when I was into 4-wheeling.  I've cut some decent sized blowdowns out of the road, in a pinch. 

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My favorite hatchet is this one. I carry it under the seat in my truck. It’s date sometime prior to 1950, a Ward’s carpenter’s hatchet, made by Kelly Axe & Tool Co., a couple hours north of here in Charleston, West Virginia. 

I found it a several years ago. I cut a new wedge for the handle, polished the head and gave it a nice sharp edge. I left the smudges of barn red and white paint, along with the other battle scars for posterity.

It was my Poppy’s ❤️ 

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