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The Cleanest Ear Corn I Have Ever Seen.


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  • Art From Coleman changed the title to The Cleanest Ear Corn I Have Ever Seen.

Watching that tractor turn around reminds me of how rough the end rows used to be when we would cultivate.  Especially when I was a young kid and herbicides weren't what they are today.  They would try to throw a lot of dirt to control weeds in the row and it made some big ridges.

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2 minutes ago, IH Forever said:

Watching that tractor turn around reminds me of how rough the end rows used to be when we would cultivate.  Especially when I was a young kid and herbicides weren't what they are today.  They would try to throw a lot of dirt to control weeds in the row and it made some big ridges.

never thought about that much in corn but you are correct, The potato farmers up here grade the head lands with a road grader when they hill potatoes it gets real rough

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6 minutes ago, m.c.farmerboy said:

never thought about that much in corn but you are correct, The potato farmers up here grade the head lands with a road grader when they hill potatoes it gets real rough

I don't remember it but my Dad says they would sometimes disk the end rows.  Problem with that was they would get really greasy if it rained.

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3 minutes ago, IH Forever said:

I don't remember it but my Dad says they would sometimes disk the end rows.  Problem with that was they would get really greasy if it rained.

Guy by me has an old flail chopper he cleans up around all his fields and feeds it to his heifers his place is very well kept and his corn fields look nice

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14 minutes ago, nepoweshiekfarmalls said:

My 656 hydro used to sit under a New Idea/ Avco corn picker every fall.

bet that guy thought he had the world by the short hairs.

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4 hours ago, nepoweshiekfarmalls said:

My 656 hydro used to sit under a New Idea/ Avco corn picker every fall.

Now there is another ideal job for a hydro that I hadn't considered.

Lets see, all I need is; 

1, Get the 826 moving and make sure the hydro is strong.

2, Find NFE to swap on.

3, Find 234 (?) picker for said tractor.

4, Get even wider row corn-planter. Don't think most pickers will go down 36" rows.

Maybe it would be easier to just keep combining with the 1460.

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53 minutes ago, DT Fan said:

Now there is another ideal job for a hydro that I hadn't considered.

Lets see, all I need is; 

1, Get the 826 moving and make sure the hydro is strong.

2, Find NFE to swap on.

3, Find 234 (?) picker for said tractor.

4, Get even wider row corn-planter. Don't think most pickers will go down 36" rows.

Maybe it would be easier to just keep combining with the 1460.

you can pick 36" rows but I wouldn't want 18.4 tires.

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4 hours ago, ny bill o said:

bet that guy thought he had the world by the short hairs.

 

5 hours ago, nepoweshiekfarmalls said:

My 656 hydro used to sit under a New Idea/ Avco corn picker every fall.

Dad said they bought a new 656 hydro and they had a really muddy fall and they only finished picking because it was hydro. They finished Christmas day. This is the 656 . We didn't have a mounted picker but a pull type

IMG_20211229_194715483.jpg

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4 minutes ago, randy hall said:

you can pick 36" rows but I wouldn't want 18.4 tires.

Well, I do have 18.4x34's on said 826.... I'm just spitballing here. Doubt if I live long enough to put this plan in action. I will say, never say never. Picking ear corn while growing up was one of my favorite things on the farm. Dad like feeding cob and all to the feeder cattle. Shoveling ear corn into that blasted hammer-mill and loosing my hearing was not one of my favorite activities on the farm!

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4 hours ago, bitty said:

 

Dad said they bought a new 656 hydro and they had a really muddy fall and they only finished picking because it was hydro. They finished Christmas day. This is the 656 . We didn't have a mounted picker but a pull type

IMG_20211229_194715483.jpg

Is that a #76 Combine? 

Mac

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39 minutes ago, MacAR said:

Is that a #76 Combine? 

Mac

I don't know. I will ask Dad. It could be my dad's uncle's combine as they co-owned some equipment over the years. I just remember the 76 used JD 4400 arrive at the farm in 78 . We traded the 656 in 81 on an AC 6080

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19 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

And I am sure that it is all thanks to the M under the picker.

But completely oblivious to the ears falling off the back of the wagon at the 1:00 minute mark.

 

I like the dog running back and forth between the rows.Now all is needed is two 14 year old boys with single barrel shotguns waiting for pheasants to fly up.

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They were able to turn pretty quickly at the end rows and don't seem to loose cobs.  When I have run a corn picker for the farm museum I occasionally bail corn over the side if I turn too quickly at the end rows and the elevator is not yet empty!

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15 hours ago, Rawleigh99 said:

They were able to turn pretty quickly at the end rows and don't seem to loose cobs.  When I have run a corn picker for the farm museum I occasionally bail corn over the side if I turn too quickly at the end rows and the elevator is not yet empty!

If you look closely, the wagon elevator kicks out when the snouts are raised.

The John Deere 227 and 237 were the same, but you had to push the lever on the LH side of the seat to re-engage the wagon elevator, once you re-entered the rows, after completing the turn around, or if you had raised the row units after crossing the waterway.

Now, I am wondering  IF the wagon elevator on a pull type picker kicked out.  I also was never around, or paid any attention to the 'lesser' brands.

The sound of all the chains "whirring" is one of the sounds, that I can not forget, the smell of the diesel-dirt mixture on a Caterpillar is another unique smell that stays in your mind forever, even more memorable than the sour smell of mud-manure in the feedlot.

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22 hours ago, Jacka said:

I like the dog running back and forth between the rows.Now all is needed is two 14 year old boys with single barrel shotguns waiting for pheasants to fly up.

My Dad carried his shotgun on the picker for the same purpose.

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We had a New Idea mounted picker while I was growing up, not sure the model. Husking bed was mounted to the tractor like most others I've seen. Pretty sure it had a lever to engage/disengage the elevator. I can remember my uncle Dan shutting it off on the turn-around then the big rush when he got straightened out.

There must have been a real art to getting wagons full and not throwing lots of corn on the ground. Just following the contours of some of my fields today would probably pitch some over the sides.

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When I was quite young my Grandpa and Dad had a mounted New Idea picker on a 560.  They had both a sheller attachment and a husking bed.  When they got a combine that was traded in on a New Idea pull type.  I'm pretty sure that had a rope you would pull to trip the elevator and shut it off when turning around.

The "semi-mounted" husking bed seems like a good idea to take some weight off the tractor.  But obviously it never really caught on.

I was still pretty young at that time so never got to run the picker.  I did get to help hauling the Walsh flare boxes home behind the SMTA and unloading in Dad's double crib.

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First job I had in the field with a tractor was hauling wagons from the picker with the Super M.  2 row New Idea pull type was behind 656.  We picked corn later than most in this area because the landlord wanted to see the cribs used.   Fun times in fall as a kid, and shelling in summer.

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The first picker I remember on the farm was a New Idea mounted on a WD-45. Worked good. Don't remember the story exactly but it caught fire after filling with gas, blew the gas tank right off the machine! My cousin Dale got a log chain on it somehow and got it away from the gas barrel. Uncle Dan was able to borrow a 560 with I believe a 234 picker to finish harvest. It was wet that fall, (don't remember the year) anyway the picker tractor got stuck.

The next year, Uncle Dan bought another WD-45, well, apparently people were already into not letting a perfectly good sticker go to waste.... The Uncle didn't recognize the subtle differences. It just didn't have enough power to run the picker and pull a full wagon in our hills. Time frame would have been 1979 or so, maybe 80-81, don't remember for sure. Pretty sure they only ran the WD one year. Then he found a Super M with rice and canes on it. Now we were picking corn!

9 minutes ago, Mr. Plow said:

First job I had in the field with a tractor was hauling wagons from the picker with the Super M.  2 row New Idea pull type was behind 656.  We picked corn later than most in this area because the landlord wanted to see the cribs used.   Fun times in fall as a kid, and shelling in summer.

Mr. Plow, much the same for me. Wasn't too crazy about the shelling though.

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9 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

If you look closely, the wagon elevator kicks out when the snouts are raised.

The John Deere 227 and 237 were the same, but you had to push the lever on the LH side of the seat to re-engage the wagon elevator, once you re-entered the rows, after completing the turn around, or if you had raised the row units after crossing the waterway.

Now, I am wondering  IF the wagon elevator on a pull type picker kicked out.  I also was never around, or paid any attention to the 'lesser' brands.

The sound of all the chains "whirring" is one of the sounds, that I can not forget, the smell of the diesel-dirt mixture on a Caterpillar is another unique smell that stays in your mind forever, even more memorable than the sour smell of mud-manure in the feedlot.

I remember my grandfather telling me stories of running a mounted Deere corn picker, probably a 226. He said that when it was wet the tractor couldn’t pull a wagon, so they would pick, with the elevator turned off, whatever the elevator hopper would hold. Then drive over to the wagon, clear it out, and get some more. It sounded like a terrible job to me, but he always told the story with a smile. He never complained about it. When he farmed he said they never really cared if for some reason they couldn’t get it picked, they would just turn the hogs in and let them clean it up. They just needed some corn for the cows and the rest of it was for the hogs anyway. 

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