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What's the best way to teach the young kids?


756puller
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Got my neighbor kid, a freshman in highschool, swapping a motor in a suburban for me. Having him swap it cause the shop owner is 70 and the other two of us that work there just don't have time/desire to do this periocular job. The shop owner is paying him $20/hr to do it. It's been one of those jobs we just told him to swap it and help him of need be. Is this an alright approach?

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Long as it runs when he's done with it that's the main thing, it takes alot to get the owner mad at you up here. I don't even have to have my own tools here and I can bring in projects of my own and charge my own shop rate for it and I don't even have to pay stall rent.

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I have done the same with a young man. Before I turned him loose with the project I gave him some suggestions I have learned in my lifetime. I have learned to take pictures of every step of the project. Tag and mark every wire/hose connection. Things like that. When he finished swapping engines it was hard to tell anything had been done, all back in place. To this day, he still thinks out each step before messing something up. Great young MAN.

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That's exact how my dad taught me to quit blowing engines in my first car, a 64 1/2 Mustang. He made me change it out by myself and only coming out to look if I had questions.. After I changed out the 3rd engine I realized that long skinny pedal to the right isn't suppose to touch the carpet. Some kids have the knack, especially if they grew up around a mechanically inclined dad or other family members. That's how it was for me and now I do the exact same thing for a living as my Dad did, an industrial maintenance mechanic. Been 5 years since Dad's been gone and now I'm teaching my son the exact same things now.

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2 minutes ago, acem said:

Patience and persistence. Details and attitude are important. Thx-Ace 

  You beat me to it.  I would add respect to your list.  Too many parents think that instilling a mean streak is the best way to bring a kid along.  All that does is develop another jerk with no social skills.  

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What everyone else says plus, and I haven't read it but it might be between the lines, don't let him learn or teach him shortcuts, long hand until his skill set is there, I taught my kid pipe cutting, fitting and hanging black and showed him every "proper" step, right down to fences on scaffolding and wearing a harness, me, never, unless worksafe was around, him, yes, didn't want to explain mistakes to his mother either.

I did my first clutch at 13, rear ends, trans, uni joints after that, up to motors and brake systems after that, still learning at 74, and on top of that I'm still listening to guys smarter than me.

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No better teacher than hands on, period. I took on little jobs swapping lawn tractor engines and such. With a helpful and patient elder, kids can learn a lot. Don't be afraid to ask questions and look in books is my thoughts to this day. 

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I have some high school help with my shop work.  I generally tell them what I need done and supervise from afar until it gets to critical points, like torque specs, ect.  I provide manuals and tools.  It has varying success, but I feel its important to assist in learning.  Challenging people in a positive way is good for everyone.  It helps them feel involved and important.  It makes them a stakeholder, and helps to show the importance of being a good operator in the field.

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I agree with everything said above and want to add that the tasks given cant be boring and tedious. Sweeping the floor is fine, it teaches humility and starting at the bottom. It also sucks and is boring, they loose interest in being in that building. I try to keep the little tykes interested with letting them trouble shoot, I wont tell them what's wrong and why, they have to tell me. "Here change this" creates part changes, troubleshooting makes technicians. My kids won't ever feel like they know it all because if they get to thinking that way, I will give them something to stump them. They will never feel like bottom of the bucket because I will grab a broom and sweep with them. 

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7 hours ago, JaredT said:

I agree with everything said above and want to add that the tasks given cant be boring and tedious. Sweeping the floor is fine, it teaches humility and starting at the bottom. It also sucks and is boring, they loose interest in being in that building. I try to keep the little tykes interested with letting them trouble shoot, I wont tell them what's wrong and why, they have to tell me. "Here change this" creates part changes, troubleshooting makes technicians. My kids won't ever feel like they know it all because if they get to thinking that way, I will give them something to stump them. They will never feel like bottom of the bucket because I will grab a broom and sweep with them. 

You are never above the grunt work. Housekeeping should be done by all, and a vary valid point. I started at a truck shop and sadly right when I started, work was very slow. Two, maybe three trucks for the two shifts. So, three trucks, not six a day. Boy, you get agitated quickly with almost a month worth of sweeping and washing shop owned tools and watching everyone else do work you can do. Hated it, I was hired to work on trucks, till it hit me, I use these tools also, and I can also clean them up. Still hated it though. 

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5 hours ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

You are never above the grunt work. Housekeeping should be done by all, and a vary valid point. I started at a truck shop and sadly right when I started, work was very slow. Two, maybe three trucks for the two shifts. So, three trucks, not six a day. Boy, you get agitated quickly with almost a month worth of sweeping and washing shop owned tools and watching everyone else do work you can do. Hated it, I was hired to work on trucks, till it hit me, I use these tools also, and I can also clean them up. Still hated it though. 

I grew up at my Dad’s farm equipment shop, did a ton of  grunt work, fought it a lot too, in my later teens I started my automotive mechanic career at the local Chevrolet dealer, my knowledge and willingness to do the dirty work kept me employed while other junior “mechanics” got laid off, years later running my own garage, I still have to sweep the floors and take the garbage out

I think your taking a good approach with the young lad, I’m intrigued about how he’ll go about that job, if it is a 05 Suburban, take the intake manifold  off? remove the exhaust manifolds before or after pulling the motor? Remove the water pump and/or the crank pulley? Pull the whole front clip or just the rad support? There is more than one way to do that job, it doesn’t pull up and out as straightforward as an 85 Suburban 

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