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NeXaT - Probably the most innovative ag machine I have seen in my lifetime.


EquipmentJunkie

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3 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

It’s not a new concept.  A traction unit used for spraying, planting, harvesting.  Sounds similar to the MM and later New Idea uni harvester.  

My grandpa as a blacksmith was a New Idea dealer in his later years. 

Retired in the early sixties, I still remember the advertising posters on his shop wall. 

If only I'd a been old enough to know to keep them. 

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5 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

My grandpa as a blacksmith was a New Idea dealer in his later years. 

Retired in the early sixties, I still remember the advertising posters on his shop wall. 

If only I'd a been old enough to know to keep them. 

When were the last ones made?  I thought they were made into the 80s.

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Just now, Big Bud guy said:

When were the last ones made?  I thought they were made into the 80s.

I do not know. 

My neighbor has a UNI that he uses to pick ear corn. 

It looks fairly modern. 

Sure could have been made in the 70's or 80's.

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I have no personal experience with a UNI harvester but from people who have been around them they all say the same thing. They work good for a small farm with small acreage but if you wanted high production then you would be better suited with a dedicated machine designed for the task.

this machine seems to have that issue solved.

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Dad bought a new uni in mid 70s. Had a Perkins diesel.  Sounded good. We had a picker, chopper, and combine unit for ours. I don't think any of those were new when we bought them, just the power unit as far as I can recall. 

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Love the video of the farmland in the Ukraine. Have seen pictures of it before. Our great grandparents and their parents on all sides immigrated here from that region of the Ukraine. The political turmoil and the opportunity of free land brought them to the north central USA. Their ancestors had moved from France German border area in the 1700 to Russia controlled Ukraine with the promise of free land and freedom of religion , military service and non interference of Russian government,

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There was just a thread on here a month or so about how large combines really can't get much bigger and still be able to transport down the roads. I guess nobody thought about driving the machine sideways.

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1 hour ago, ray54 said:

Just got Ageless Iron magazine, the back page was the history of the JD rotary combine. With the title of The Green Combine with a Red Heart. The head JD engineer said he copied the IH 1460.

 

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Sounds like an interesting article considering this is what JD had in the late 50s.

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7 minutes ago, Art From Coleman said:

Didn't New Holland's twin rotor combines come out several years before IH released the Axial Flo?

About 2 years.  Course now that design is what everybody is copying or going to copy in the bigger classes

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Does anyone remember the futuristic drawings IH had in the late 60's or early 70's of combines? Seems like this is similar.

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In the 1960's an agricultural college got a (much smaller) "machine for everything " from Germany to trial - I forget the brand.  The literature was also in German but the engineer in charge reckoned he knew the purpose of the "dungerstrewer" (sp?)

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On 12/11/2021 at 8:18 PM, ray54 said:

Just got Ageless Iron magazine, the back page was the history of the JD rotary combine. With the title of The Green Combine with a Red Heart. The head JD engineer said he copied the IH 1460.

My Father-In-Law was head of the Manufacturing Engineering Dept at Deere Harvester Works.  He said the first train load of IH Axial Flow combines supposedly spent the weekend at the Harvester Works,  engineers crawling all over the outside and Inside of the machines.  Somebody at the railroad called Somebody at Deere and a hundred people's weekends got changed.

   Took a long time for farmers to accept the Axial Flow combine, lots of farmers still raised small grains more for straw for bedding for livestock than the actual grain itself and the axial flow machines chopped the straw up more like chaff, there's still old farmers that refuse to use a red combine for this reason.

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11 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

 

"Sounds like an interesting article considering this is what JD had in the late 50s."

You do realize that totally, and I do mean totally, contradicts, what "head JD engineer" said about "copying an IH 1460".

 

No kidding.  That’s why I posted it.  I question the accuracy of the article. JD was about 6-8 years ahead of IH when it came to rotary development.  Not only that.  IH sued NH over the TR combine and JD got involved too even though they didn’t even have a rotary combine on the market.  

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19 minutes ago, Art From Coleman said:

John Deere must have had Lionel Hutz in charge of their legal department, and relied on Madam ZooDoo and her crystal ball (from the SHOE comic strip) to see into the future.

Hopefully, the judge laughed both IH and JD out of his court.

The basis for the lawsuit was the fact the head engineer for the NH combine was hired away from IH in the late 60s and might have took a few patents that didn’t belong to him.

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1 hour ago, Art From Coleman said:

"

Sounds like this Ageless Iron magazine (and I mean NO disrespect to those who subscribe to it), employs the same fact checking process as does the mainstream MEDIA)(Which is NONE)

 

I think it’s fact.  I can’t remember the engineers name right now but you could probably look up the patents and lawsuits if you want.  Besides I got the info out of this book.  https://octanepress.com/book/red-combines-1915-2020?gclid=CjwKCAiA-9uNBhBTEiwAN3IlNFdbLs-G5EKIC8Wz0g4mP8Mnef6rSKOLqTZ36oHHSeWMxVvRfGM2yxoCXtMQAvD_BwE
 

If I’m not mistaken, some of the authors of this book frequent this website.  

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