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Broken valve stems


idahydro
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We always used to break tractor tire beads with a handyman jack. Inside is easy, just put the jack against the drawbar and push. Outside is a little more challenging, done with judicious use of a log chain to jack against. 

The bead breaker is only something I invested in later on when I had disposable income.

One thing I do recommend investing in are good tire spoons. You can tell the good ones are thin and smooth, the cheap ones are thicker and rough. The cheap ones bend easily, no temper in the steel. Kentool is the brand for the good ones, though I'm sure there are others. Tractor supply has the cheap ones but they charge Kentool prices for them. Two 30" straight tire spoons will do just about anything.

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16 hours ago, snoshoe said:

Been using it for years. Not quite as heavy as calcium but close. Minus the corrosion problems.

Antifreeze is probably a good choice from an engineering standpoint, but as a veterinarian I can tell you from experience it doesn't take much leaking ethylene glycol to kill a farm dog and they love the taste. So be mindful.

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I finally got a truck out there to replace the tube.  He did it with the wheel still mounted. He drilled out the broken core to allow a higher flow rate and then put a hose with a hose clamp on the stem to move the ballast, almost 100 gallons.  Inside of the rim looks great. A tiny amount of corrosion around the valve stem but its much worse on the outside of the rim than the inside.  The other side was in pretty good shape so he just replaced the valve core housing and called it good.  Not a cheap farm call, but the skidder chains are back on and its ready to go to work again so I'm happy.  He did say start to save up for new tires because the ones I've got are well on their way out.

I didn't appreciate how heavy that wheel must be.  It has 1100 lbs of ballast in it alone.

IMG_20211215_160906.jpg

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  • 6 months later...

Just to update this thread, when I took the chains off this spring I inspected the rear tires and the dry rot has accelerated, so rather than end up with a flat somewhere inconvenient I am replacing them.  Supply of new tires in this size was pretty limited, local tire shop had few options and inventory and they were very expensive so I took a gamble on some Turkish made Petlas tires (TA110 460/85R34 R1W radials) and had them freighted here.  Hopefully the decision to go with radials isn't a mistake on this loader tractor. I might have to make a ballast box to compensate for the lost weight from the fluid leaving the tires.  We will see.  The cost difference vs bias was only a couple hundred bucks.

Service guys charge a mint to dispose of the calcium and I wanted to take the opportunity to repaint the rims, move the valve stem to the inside, and move the hubs out as wide as possible while the tires were off so I decided to try and change them myself.  I'm not done yet, but so far one side is fully dismantled without too much incident. I managed with just a couple of 30" tire spoons for tools, a couple jacks, and a length of hose and hose clamp for draining out the ballast.  Without a pump I had to leave a hundred and fifty pounds or so of fluid in the tube until I got the tube out which made manipulating the tire on the ground much more difficult.  I broke the beads with a floor jack and a 2" ratchet strap.  I spread the calcium on the gravel driveway.

No chance I would have got the lug bolts or hub bolts off without an impact wrench. The hub bolts look great, some of the lug bolts may need replacement.

Here is where we are at so far.

Super professional 2x4 blocking under a 6 ton jack stand.  The brakes have always been weak on this tractor so I figured I'd take the opportunity to service them while I have easier access.

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New tires.

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The extent of the rust on the inner rim.  Doesn't penetrate very deeply. The rest of the rim is quite good, a little superficial rust on the outside and some oxidized, chalky paint.

Compress_20220629_163436_6718.thumb.jpg.e4bab01aef1c459106bf9b90f546f584.jpg

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1 hour ago, IHC_1470 said:

Going back as tubeless or are these a tube type tire?

Good question, I was planning on using tubes because I assumed by old rims weren't capable of being run tubeless but after further research maybe they are.  I have tubes to install so I'll probably just use them.

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9 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

It is good to see that someone takes blocking seriously.

I can't tell if you are joking or not but I haven't died yet!  Of course it would be better if the feet of the the jack stand were on the corners of the cribbing instead of up against them. I actually want to put some 3/16" plate on top of the cribs to distribute the load a little better and keep the jack feet from digging in but haven't done it yet.

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11 hours ago, idahydro said:

Good question, I was planning on using tubes because I assumed by old rims weren't capable of being run tubeless but after further research maybe they are.  I have tubes to install so I'll probably just use them.

When the tire guy came to put my new tires on my 1586, he installed them tubeless on the original rims (dated 1979 on the inside). Plain jane old double bevel rims as far as I could tell, nothing special.

He did have a bit of trouble seating them, had to use a strap and two bead cheetahs on one. Then he put 5 gallons of RimGuard in each tire to act as a sealer. A little squeezed out around the bead, but the tires have been holding air now for over a year.

If you're doing it yourself, and putting the calcium back, I'd put the tubes in.

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He mentioned losing weight, and spreading calcium on the driveway so I don’t think it’s going back in but I may have misread.  I would’ve put it back in myself.  I’ve never had a tubeless tire. Even when you buy new radials around here, the tire shops want to sell you a tube to put inside of them. 

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Yes I removed the calcium and was not planning on putting it back, at least for now.  Consensus and tire manufacturer recommendations is that ballasting radial tires is counterproductive.

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On 12/16/2021 at 6:42 PM, idahydro said:

I finally got a truck out there to replace the tube.  He did it with the wheel still mounted. He drilled out the broken core to allow a higher flow rate and then put a hose with a hose clamp on the stem to move the ballast, almost 100 gallons.  Inside of the rim looks great. A tiny amount of corrosion around the valve stem but its much worse on the outside of the rim than the inside.  The other side was in pretty good shape so he just replaced the valve core housing and called it good.  Not a cheap farm call, but the skidder chains are back on and its ready to go to work again so I'm happy.  He did say start to save up for new tires because the ones I've got are well on their way out.

I didn't appreciate how heavy that wheel must be.  It has 1100 lbs of ballast in it alone.

IMG_20211215_160906.jpg

If that's an original rim, I'm overly impressed, especially having been loaded. Here's what I battled a cple years ago with new tires and tubes. No calcium to my knowledge been in these. All rims will rust, once rusty can cause issues with tubes if not cleaned and painted 75 percent of my tractors have loaded tires, this one and a bobcat has had more flats than any of the others.  One tractors been loaded since the 60s, different tires and tubes, same rims. 

Just my experience 

IMG_20200613_164959914.jpg

IMG_20200614_143227065.jpg

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On 6/30/2022 at 9:01 AM, idahydro said:

I can't tell if you are joking or not but I haven't died yet!  Of course it would be better if the feet of the the jack stand were on the corners of the cribbing instead of up against them. I actually want to put some 3/16" plate on top of the cribs to distribute the load a little better and keep the jack feet from digging in but haven't done it yet.

He is complimentary, the only thing that could have been better was the jack stands sitting on the cross piece as you now realize, a technique lost on many

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On 6/30/2022 at 11:26 PM, td9inidaho said:

If that's an original rim, I'm overly impressed, especially having been loaded. Here's what I battled a cple years ago with new tires and tubes. No calcium to my knowledge been in these. All rims will rust, once rusty can cause issues with tubes if not cleaned and painted 75 percent of my tractors have loaded tires, this one and a bobcat has had more flats than any of the others.  One tractors been loaded since the 60s, different tires and tubes, same rims. 

Just my experience 

IMG_20200613_164959914.jpg

IMG_20200614_143227065.jpg

They are certainly old, but I don't think they are original equipment, they are the welded 9 bolt duals style as you can kinda see in this photo rather than the 2 piece bolted style I assume the tractor came with.  What did you put on the inside of that rim in the photo you attached?  Is that POR15?  I've always wondered if that wouldn't make a great protective inner rim surface.

588496277_IMG_20211220_115714(1).thumb.jpg.3bdfc7a0d73bc5bc3d57dfd972d88fec.jpg

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On 6/29/2022 at 10:15 PM, Art From Coleman said:

It is good to see that someone takes blocking seriously.

Thank you. Those are made as wheel cribs for working on my truck and trailers, so they are a bit wider than optimal with the jack sitting on it but even not sitting on the corners it felt pretty solid when it lowered the axles onto it. 

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The rust was just rough enough to puncture the new tubes, so I wire wheeled the rims clean as I could, then sprayed rust stop, topped with epoxy paint. Time will tell. So far no more flats 

Mark

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Got the left rim wire wheeled, degreased then remounted, then primed and painted.  First time using a spray gun and a bit awkward painting it place, but it came out pretty nice all things considered.  Looks funny with a shiny wheel attached to the rest of a weathered tractor.

Rustoleum Professional Enamel "Rusty Metal Primer" 2 coats, thinned with acetone.  Dried so fast I basically painted both coats back to back.

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Rustoleum Farm & Implement "IH Red", 2 coats, thinned with xylene and about 10% enamel catalyst/hardener.

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Need to wait for the paint to cure in the sun for a week or so then I'll remount the tire.

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