Jump to content

pellet stoves?


littlered166
 Share

Recommended Posts

 

1 hour ago, hobbyfarm said:

I don't think the fuel is very flammable without air being blown over it.  Maybe I am wrong but I don't see my pellet stack as dangerous any more so then any other things I store.  You can't really burn pellets outside of the stove or as a camp fire.  On the multi fuel stoves or at least the ones I have seen there is something to stir the fire so it doesn't clump up and another itself out.

Unless one has there own pellet mill I totally agree with you on the dependency.  Kind of like oil gas etc. If you are going to use it you are trapped.  On the harman stove side they may be done making corn stoves.  I understand they were a slow mover.  On their pellet stoves you can mix corn and wood pellets 50/50 and they will burn it just fine without clumping.  Trouble is without a mixing system it is a pain and easier to just dump the bag or wood pellets in the stove.

The bixby stove is the only self cleaning corn stove that was ever designed that I know of. It builds a brick in a 2 piece burn chamber and when it gets to the right size it cuts the brick in 2 pieces dropping the lower part into a ash pan. It’s a pretty slick deal that can be troublesome but usually when you get the corn amount dialed in you just don’t touch it. I also heard Harmon was not offering its pc45 stove anymore. Just not enough people interested in the hassle of burning corn. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, hobbyfarm said:

I don't think the fuel is very flammable without air being blown over it.  Maybe I am wrong but I don't see my pellet stack as dangerous any more so then any other things I store.  You can't really burn pellets outside of the stove or as a camp fire.  On the multi fuel stoves or at least the ones I have seen there is something to stir the fire so it doesn't clump up and another itself out.

Unless one has there own pellet mill I totally agree with you on the dependency.  Kind of like oil gas etc. If you are going to use it you are trapped.  On the harman stove side they may be done making corn stoves.  I understand they were a slow mover.  On their pellet stoves you can mix corn and wood pellets 50/50 and they will burn it just fine without clumping.  Trouble is without a mixing system it is a pain and easier to just dump the bag or wood pellets in the stove.

The only thing that is truly independent is a good old inside wood stove. Was talking to a friend who was saying that he was glad he had outdoor wood boiler because he didn’t have to rely on anything for heat, well if you don’t have power circulators won’t work. So your right about being dependent  on one thing or another, because most of us are. We are completely dependent on our power grid. Only a few aren’t. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

FWIW my quadra-fire has a battery backup ( hook up a 12 volt battery ) and it will run the stove - as far as storage of pellets or being readily available they are everywhere around here no issues at all getting them. Prices havent changed on pellets from last yr to this yr, and corn is way too expensive to use right now. Not economical at all. 

I will always have my top loader wood stove - its definitely reliable and puts out tons of heat, can cook on it with the flat top and oven and it has a hot water tank on the side too if a guy was to lose power.  

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

FWIW my quadra-fire has a battery backup ( hook up a 12 volt battery ) and it will run the stove - as far as storage of pellets or being readily available they are everywhere around here no issues at all getting them. Prices havent changed on pellets from last yr to this yr, and corn is way too expensive to use right now. Not economical at all. 

I will always have my top loader wood stove - its definitely reliable and puts out tons of heat, can cook on it with the flat top and oven and it has a hot water tank on the side too if a guy was to lose power.  

 

We have a Glenwood Home Grand. Before kids we heated enough of the house with it. It will load top or front but the walls show the dirt and now it's just an ornament in the kitchen. We used to fire it up for Thanksgiving to have the extra oven and cook top but no longer. My mom's stove was converted to oil, common back in the day. It had a 5 gallon jug on a stand that would gurgle and make us kids laugh. It ran 24/7 in the winter and was the only heat in the kitchen, sometimes the only heat in the house when money was tight.

I looked into converting ours but other than the big round wicks all the parts are  unobtainium. Converting to propane is an option albeit an expensive one.

The attached is a Glenwood C, pretty much the same stove as the 1908 Home Grand

glenwood_c_open.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our pellet stove is currently our only source of heat.  The previous owner of this place tore all the radiators and stuff out and never finished whatever they were planning.  Hopefully next year we will have central heat. 

I would compare the heat off our pellet stove to a hot air furnace.  It doesn't radiate heat anything like a wood or coal stove.  My wife says it is a cold heat.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, New Englander said:

We have a Glenwood Home Grand. Before kids we heated enough of the house with it. It will load top or front but the walls show the dirt and now it's just an ornament in the kitchen. We used to fire it up for Thanksgiving to have the extra oven and cook top but no longer. My mom's stove was converted to oil, common back in the day. It had a 5 gallon jug on a stand that would gurgle and make us kids laugh. It ran 24/7 in the winter and was the only heat in the kitchen, sometimes the only heat in the house when money was tight.

I looked into converting ours but other than the big round wicks all the parts are  unobtainium. Converting to propane is an option albeit an expensive one.

The attached is a Glenwood C, pretty much the same stove as the 1908 Home Grand

glenwood_c_open.jpg

 

 

This is the one I have - the rock wall behind it, we picked up the rocks out in montana in a guys field and hauled them back to missouri 

 

image.thumb.png.cf20dbe89383955359c9069d27a44f84.png

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, hobbyfarm said:

Our pellet stove is currently our only source of heat.  The previous owner of this place tore all the radiators and stuff out and never finished whatever they were planning.  Hopefully next year we will have central heat. 

I would compare the heat off our pellet stove to a hot air furnace.  It doesn't radiate heat anything like a wood or coal stove.  My wife says it is a cold heat.

if a guy states his opinion in the woods w/out his wife hearing it, is he still wrong ? LOL -  i agree its a hot forced air feeling heat - cold heat is what a heat pump puts out i have one of those if my back goes out and I cant cut wood 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a Wood fired Stanley-Waterford cook stove that my wife grew up with if it were up to me it would be hooked to the wet end of a Mooring chain. What a miserable heap, needs microscopic wood, if it isn’t puking smoke out of every crack it is making gobs and gobs of creosote. The 5” pipe is impossible to get clean as it expands to 6” metalbestos and it gobbles wood without really having much to show for it. Takes up roughly the same amount of room as a full size truck in the kitchen.

Horrid, miserable thing. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

We have a Wood fired Stanley-Waterford cook stove that my wife grew up with if it were up to me it would be hooked to the wet end of a Mooring chain. What a miserable heap, needs microscopic wood, if it isn’t puking smoke out of every crack it is making gobs and gobs of creosote. The 5” pipe is impossible to get clean as it expands to 6” metalbestos and it gobbles wood without really having much to show for it. Takes up roughly the same amount of room as a full size truck in the kitchen.

Horrid, miserable thing. 

You really have a difficult time expressing your feelings😁.

Our stove wasn't too bad about making creosote as we tended to run it fairly hard. It never leaked smoke as we have a tall chimney with a good draft. The smoke it emitted was due to our top loading it rather than front.

One of our guys who also grew up with a similar stove said they fed it corn cobs and that his grandmother could keep a precise oven temp with that method.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I too have a Quadrafire pellet stove that also burns corn. When corn is less than 4.75 I’ll burn it. Over I burn pellets. Buy 3 ton in August for $185/ton. Will last till February. Then buy 1 ton more. If I had the room I would buy all in off season. Had same stove for over 12 years. Mostly trouble free. A couple of fans and a computer board because of lightning. Heats whole house till down to 15* with wind then propane furnace will run once in a while to supplement. Overall really happy with this unit and would buy another 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, New Englander said:

You really have a difficult time expressing your feelings😁.

Our stove wasn't too bad about making creosote as we tended to run it fairly hard. It never leaked smoke as we have a tall chimney with a good draft. The smoke it emitted was due to our top loading it rather than front.

One of our guys who also grew up with a similar stove said they fed it corn cobs and that his grandmother could keep a precise oven temp with that method.

The Ford 2 N of wood stoves. 

  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

We have a Wood fired Stanley-Waterford cook stove that my wife grew up with if it were up to me it would be hooked to the wet end of a Mooring chain. What a miserable heap, needs microscopic wood, if it isn’t puking smoke out of every crack it is making gobs and gobs of creosote. The 5” pipe is impossible to get clean as it expands to 6” metalbestos and it gobbles wood without really having much to show for it. Takes up roughly the same amount of room as a full size truck in the kitchen.

Horrid, miserable thing. 

 

1 hour ago, New Englander said:

You really have a difficult time expressing your feelings😁.

Our stove wasn't too bad about making creosote as we tended to run it fairly hard. It never leaked smoke as we have a tall chimney with a good draft. The smoke it emitted was due to our top loading it rather than front.

One of our guys who also grew up with a similar stove said they fed it corn cobs and that his grandmother could keep a precise oven temp with that method.

That brings back memories!

At my Moms family's house in Maine they had a "Home Clarion" kitchen stove. It wasn't used much in my memory but when it was it must have been fired hot since the kitchen was 9000 degrees when it was going. It had coal grates in it but wood was used mostly. I remember several wooden soda crate boxes next to it, one with split birch to get it going and the others all had split hard maple. I doubt it was ever meant to be very tight, if it wasn't burning at near incandescence it wasn't hot enough to cook. It was removed in 1971 when the chimney was found to be badly deteriorated. ( I wonder why....)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We got a St. Croix corn/pellet stove around 8 years ago. I burn corn, just a 5 gal bucket morning and night, possibly a little more if -20 and we crank it up. Averages a bushel a day. Even at 7 corn, that's 210/month, I know many people that cant heat for that. No stat, on low setting it keeps living room 80°. Have propane forced air for cool nights and backup. Usually dont start corn stove until November or December. Has to be cold out or it gets too warm in house or end up shutting it down and relighting it. It does create a brick of unburned material that needs to be dumped nearly daily and I have replaced fans once. Used to have an aquatherm outdoor boiler till kids grew up. I can get my corn supply harvested in 10 minutes versus days for that hungry boiler. But like others say, it needs babysitting. When we're gone we set propane stat and shut corn down

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, TomH said:

coal grates

I looked for coal grates but the only ones I found were at a stove restoration shop and they wanted a fortune for them. Too bad, probably thousands were just thrown away. I thought coal may have been better/easier/cleaner. I have no experience on a small stove. We heated with coal as a kid into the early '60s. My father was clever. He told my mom that she made a better fire that he.

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

865938638_IMG_0055.jpgsm.thumb.jpg.19b55d36c034b0febea39ea3f958847c.jpgIMG_0679.thumb.jpg.4d288dda4fa93f6519526fa5dfd3e557.jpg

I have not owned a pellet but I know a few they are ok but you can't beat a GOOD wood stove. I am set up well to gather and process. The exercise keeps me fit (use it or loose it) . 24/7 in the cold months. No electricity or computer or fuel bill. I use little bins for the wood one to two a day depending on the weather. I put my little RV stove up there this Fall for a bit when the temps were a little to mild for the big one. Last year we had some persistent sub Zero to 10 degrees for highs so had to run the LP furnace a bit but typically I use no purchased heat with the wood stove in a two story Cape Cod style house. There is a lot of old giant Oaks and such in town and as they bare down on the houses beneath people hire cutters who usually leave the big trunk stuff cut up on the curb for a couple days hoping they won't have to pay a dump fee on that tonnage ...so I pick it up. It always feels to good to last but for thirty couple years now the trees keep coming.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a quadra fire pellet stove that I got from my neighbor for free. It works well for the garage.  I have a wood stove in the living room for the primary heat source along with a home built boiler that I made to heat upstairs.  I have burned wood my whole life and I guess I am just used to it,  I much prefer the wood stove. I  buy pellets by the pallet load for the garage and I feel like I have to fiddle with it a lot. As hot as my wife likes the house,  I wouldn't be able to afford any other heat than wood anyhow.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I were to ever go to burning pellets I would go with a boiler. I saw a really nice indoor unit that the local hvac dealer was using to heat his whole shop. A couple years ago the woodmaster dealer had an outdoor unit set up to burn pellets. They said they had a couple out but they haven't been in service long enough to really see how they work. One guy put a small hopper bottom grain him with an auger right to the hopper, we can buy bulk pellets here.

I like the radiant heat that I get from my boiler setup, not to mention the hot water. Most people around here that have pellet stoves put them in one room, usually the living room. That room stays nice and warm but the rest of the house is freezing cold or they have to run a secondary.heat source so in the end now much do you actually save.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, just Dave said:

865938638_IMG_0055.jpgsm.thumb.jpg.19b55d36c034b0febea39ea3f958847c.jpgIMG_0679.thumb.jpg.4d288dda4fa93f6519526fa5dfd3e557.jpg

I have not owned a pellet but I know a few they are ok but you can't beat a GOOD wood stove. I am set up well to gather and process. The exercise keeps me fit (use it or loose it) . 24/7 in the cold months. No electricity or computer or fuel bill. I use little bins for the wood one to two a day depending on the weather. I put my little RV stove up there this Fall for a bit when the temps were a little to mild for the big one. Last year we had some persistent sub Zero to 10 degrees for highs so had to run the LP furnace a bit but typically I use no purchased heat with the wood stove in a two story Cape Cod style house. There is a lot of old giant Oaks and such in town and as they bare down on the houses beneath people hire cutters who usually leave the big trunk stuff cut up on the curb for a couple days hoping they won't have to pay a dump fee on that tonnage ...so I pick it up. It always feels to good to last but for thirty couple years now the trees keep coming.

GREAT JOB--------- very resourceful

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...