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Rollover plow


KyIH
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140: is a 3 or 4 bottom in furrow: 145 is a 4 or 5 bottom in furrow: 155 was 4 or 5 bottom on land and the 165 is a 5 or 6 bottoms on land.  Those are the very best plows IH / Case IH ever made. Now they are Arts Way

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I grew up with rollover plows I have restored and sold 2 IH rollover plows and have many parts

Hard to fine them with trips but can be bought cheep if you don't need a trip plow

when adjusted correctly they do a fine job  nine to have on hilly ground so you can plow the soil up hill every time

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My uncle ran them when i was a kid. Turned over cotton, milo stalks and rolled up terraces with them. Ive always been fascinated by them. They will burry what ever lies ahead of them. Have to get use to hyd to get the trick down to make them roll over while turning all in one motion. I always wanted one and found a 145 4btm right down the road. Out west on the high plains they are still popular and bring big $. Id like to find a 3btm flip for my <100hp tractors. 

 

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They were not used in my area. 
I bought a fast hitch 2 bottom near Kearney NE. The guy I bought it from said they were used a lot in that area when they used to do flood irrigation. I’ve had fun playing with it, but as was mentioned it’s heavy.

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Rollovers were used exclusively our here in Central Valley , Ca . 
started with the #39 rope pull two bottom then , fast hitch two bottom first hydraulic rollover in 1955 , #314 fast hitch three bottom rollover that came with our 560 new 

I believe the #642 was the first IH four bottom , then on to 145 ‘s and  newer five bottoms .

Here is my #642 four bottom set up ready for plow days next Saturday and pictures of restored rollovers that I have used in my farming career

BTW the fast hitch prongs on the 314 three bottom  were reversed for  transportation .

tony 

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A question for you guys. The cylinder that rolls the plow seems to be extended at each position and retracted in the middle of roll. Is this correct? And do you actually have to retract and then extend the cylinder in a "somewhat fluid" motion to complete the roll? It seems like it might be possible to get "stuck" on center. Is that a problem or does it function differently? Ok that's several questions. TIA

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I had a 314 fast hitch rollover plow. They made a two bottom one that I should have had because it was too much weight for my 450 . The plow I had came new on a new 560 diesel

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Tony, we're going to need lots of pictures of this rig plowing!

IH also made a 'tumble plow', same concept, different mechanism. Friend Larry bought one out of Nebraska this year, not sure if it ever got here or not. He wanted to take it to Rantoul but didn't get there.

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1 hour ago, 12_Guy said:

A question for you guys. The cylinder that rolls the plow seems to be extended at each position and retracted in the middle of roll. Is this correct? And do you actually have to retract and then extend the cylinder in a "somewhat fluid" motion to complete the roll? It seems like it might be possible to get "stuck" on center. Is that a problem or does it function differently? Ok that's several questions. TIA

The plow I have is a 34 F21 like Tony pictured. You fully extend the cylinder to flip and retract to flip back

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12 minutes ago, IH Forever said:

The plow I have is a 34 F21 like Tony pictured. You fully extend the cylinder to flip and retract to flip back

Someday I will look for for one of these once half of my tractors are restored ....they will probably all be scrapped by then 

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38 minutes ago, Long Farms said:

When you flip it you have to do it quick enough to where the plow flips slightly over center so when you extend cyl it pushes to keep it going over to other side. 

Similar to the Case 580 backhoe boom over center lock 

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3 hours ago, bitty said:

I had a 314 fast hitch rollover plow. They made a two bottom one that I should have had because it was too much weight for my 450 . The plow I had came new on a new 560 diesel

When i was in middle school dad had a 450 and a 560 both LP Gas and he traded his 2-14 spinner plow for a 314 spinner plow. Then when he got the first 806 that thing would pull the 3 bottom so fast that he traded it for a 642 4 bottom 2 point spinner plow. We plowed a lot of ground with that 806 and 4-16 642 plow. Wish we would have taken some pictures. We plowed lots of wheat stubble in the summer in L4 Direct and did it for days on end. Now old alfalfa ground we plowed a lot of it in L3 TA Back and then sometimes Direct. Never had to go in L2. In those days IH used the old GAU plow bottoms and shares and everyone said they pulled easier than the super chiefs did in later years. But the size and weight of the equipment i feel is the biggest part as the ground is so much harder.

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We had a white 5 bottom fully mounted 6142??, I think. Loved the idea and all, worked good on TW35 Ford. Was nice because the furrow dual was just hanging out over the furrow. There was a lot of iron hanging behind you, really wanted the duals for the weight carrying. Then we updated the Ford to a Magnum 245, turns out the extra horsepower and speed ending up cracked the rollover frame. Got the frame fixed and sold the plow. Would love to have a 6 or 7 Overum trailer rollover. 

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Plowed a lot of ground in my teens with a 3388 & 140 4X16 and 5088 & 140 4X18. We always did a figure 8 turn at ends to roll the plow over, and many times plowed with 2 or 3 in the field together, so that gave time for the second one to come out the end. When going down the road, we would roll it to horizontal, or half way. This way, if top link snapped it wouldn't be nearly as disastrous! lol! Never did happen to us though. We plowed nearly everything every year, then followed it with a mulcher, or some call them a roller harrow, or cultimulcher. Lots of Brillions, but guy I worked for had an IH 315 15ft. This was in Colorado, an hour NE of Denver. Flood irrigated barley, corn, pinto beans, and sugar beets were our typical crops, occasional winter or spring wheat too. 

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36 minutes ago, Frank H said:

At a local plow day I got to watch a tumblebug plow in action.  It was pretty interesting and worked great.  I hope to see it again at some point. 

I would love to find one of those

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On 11/14/2021 at 4:03 PM, KyIH said:

Thanks for the info and the video. I think I may have to keep my eye out for one. How many different configurations did they make?  So about 30 hp per bottom? We’re there many made?

Roll-over plows were pretty much the only kind used in the potato growing area where I was from. There was a rule of thumb that you used a plow with one less bottom with a roll-over plow than the same tractor pulling a trailing (and presumably semi-mounted) plow. This was sandy loam soil and pulling a (McConnell) clodbuster behind the plow was adequate for soil preparation if planted before rain settled the ground. They figured that clodbuster was the equivalent of another bottom. So if you had an Oliver 1850 or JD 4020, or Farmall 826, pulling a three bottom roll-over with a clod buster was comparable to pulling a five bottom semi-mount or trailing plow. 

Having no dead furrows was an advantage but you also worked your way across the field just ahead of the planter. So as the day came to an end or if rain came, you didn’t have extra land plowed that would have to be reworked if you couldn’t get back in the field for a few days.

Dad got a 314 plow (3x16) with his 826 that wasn’t the best matchup.  It didn’t have that much fore-aft clearance between bottoms so even though the tractor could have pulled it faster, soil was being thrown against the bottom ahead of it and the cover crop wasn’t being buried properly.  Later on he got a IH 140 plow (3x18) that had more clearance so you could go faster with a little more width and so it was a better fit for that tractor.

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