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question led light bulbs


pt756
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Yes, there are the aforementioned ones from Menards, that look like a 3 leaf clover, and there are “corn cob” bulbs that are designed as a Ballast bypass replacement for parking lot lighting. 
https://www.rablighting.com/feature/led-post-top-lamps

 

https://www.rablighting.com/lamps

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I have three old fashioned 300w bulbs (same base as 100w, just a lot brighter and more expensive to run)high in the rafters  and last time that one of them needed to be replaced I figured the right thing to do was to replace them with LED bulbs.  I bought three of those corn cob jobbers, I believe they were 300 or 400w “equivalent”.  They were $25 or $30 ea, and I was very disappointed. I returned them and bought the last four 300w old fashioned, energy wasting bulbs that they had. 

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Back when Home Depot had their CFL 300w equivalent marked down to .99 cents with rebates.. we stocked up and have been hoarding a few hundred … they are Mine MINE ALL MINE! 

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Have used some of these at work since Lowes has them, they are quite bright and easy on the eyes. Note however that the lumens indicated is 4500 while a standard 300 watt incandescent bulb is 6000. 

GE Ultra Bright 300-Watt EQ Soft White LED Light Bulb in the General Purpose LED Light Bulbs department at Lowes.com

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12 minutes ago, TomH said:

Note however that the lumens indicated is 4500 while a standard 300 watt incandescent bulb is 6000. 

I wouldn’t 100% agree with this statement, a 300w quartz or halogen bulb would be in the neighborhood of 6000 lumens but a standard incandescent usually hovers in and around 1000-1200 lumens depending on voltage. So In would say 3000-3600 lumens could be expected from a standard screw base line voltage incandescent, so 4500 lumens is a fair improvement, and in a basement or workshop that bulb you posted is a really great inexpensive way to improve lighting! Thanks for sharing that, i will be looking for some when i am out and about. 

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I have put name brand cfls and LEDs in a steer shed and the underside of a bank barn.  Neither have held up worth a darn.  They claim rediculous hours of use but they just don't last.  Is this normal in harsher environments?

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51 minutes ago, nepoweshiekfarmalls said:

We added 4 LED lights in the unheated machine shed a year ago.  All 4 have failed this fall.  I blame the moisture off the steel roof 18" above them.

My issues aren't from moisture I don't think.  Dust dirt flies cold etc they just dont last.

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14 hours ago, hobbyfarm said:

I have put name brand cfls and LEDs in a steer shed and the underside of a bank barn.  Neither have held up worth a darn.  They claim rediculous hours of use but they just don't last.  Is this normal in harsher environments?

I used cfl and led bulbs in the dairy barn and they didn’t last either. The rare bulb that went more than four months would often rust into the socket and required replacing the ceramic fixture. But efficient bulbs saved me about a buck per month with my high usage compared to incandescent, so it took a week to pay for a cheap Menards cfl, and a month for an led. Anything longer than that was a bonus.

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14 hours ago, hobbyfarm said:

I have put name brand cfls and LEDs in a steer shed and the underside of a bank barn.  Neither have held up worth a darn.  They claim rediculous hours of use but they just don't last.  Is this normal in harsher environments?

I think a few things are at play, not sure what “name brand” you may be dealing with, i see a HUGE attrition rate with commercial electric ( Home Depot brand) GE, Cree, etc, i have the best luck with Philips and Sylvania a bulb rated for an enclosed fixture might work a little better for you, and one that doesn’t have its heat sink exposed and doesn't have open vents. 
i think longevity of incandescent bulbs was likely bad or worse than LED/CFL but no one was ever making wild claims about their lifespan. A long life incandescent bulb was just rated at a higher voltage, so a 130V 100W bulb wasn't as bright at 120V as a 120V 100w bulb, but it did last longer because it was working below its capacity and could handle the voltage spikes. 
what i am getting at is that no one had high expectations of incandescent bulbs because nothing had changed with them in 100 years, LED are better, but people expect a lot of them and everyone wants one thats less expensive. 

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The cheapo brand at menards doesn't seem to last long at all. Month or 2. F.I.T.? OR FET maybe? I think VT is right you have to be careful what brand you buy perhaps.

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Rural King sells an LED brand called Feit Electric, which are priced well and seem to last well.

https://www.feit.com/product-category/10k/

Ikea LEDs are the worst I've seen.  Lots of strobing and flickering.  Stay away.

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55 minutes ago, Steve C. said:

Rural King sells an LED brand called Feit Electric, which are priced well and seem to last well.

https://www.feit.com/product-category/10k/

Ikea LEDs are the worst I've seen.  Lots of strobing and flickering.  Stay away.

Stands to reason many of these come from the same factory, branded differently, would be really interesting to figure out what comes from where. 

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