Jump to content

Still retorquing head gaskets?


Red Tech
 Share

Recommended Posts

6 minutes ago, bitty said:

Do you think it could be that the new head gasket is helping compression push down past the rings ? 

It could. How does one go about checking that?

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doesn't make sense the leaking head gasket wouldn't change compression one bit , Chances are you never took notice on oil loss til after the engine  work was done 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, ksfarmdude said:

Doesn't make sense the leaking head gasket wouldn't change compression one bit , Chances are you never took notice on oil loss til after the engine  work was done 

If head gasket is leaking you have lower compression. No leaks and it will be higher

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, bitty said:

If head gasket is leaking you have lower compression. No leaks and it will be higher

The compression loss is miniscule unless its ran for years with a blown head gasket and not all cylinders would be affected chances are it was sipping oil to begin with

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for your replies to my question as to if it is still necessary to retorque head gaskets.  I had hoped that there would have been improvements in head gaskets in the last 40 years that would have made retorquing unnecessary.  Based on your experience, apparently I should still retorque head gaskets.

I put a Fel-Pro gasket set in a 706 gas tractor.  After running the tractor for a while to warm up the engine, I tried the head bolts that were outside of the valve cover; they did not move.  I was thinking that those under the valve cover would be the same, but maybe not.  I was trying to avoid the hassle of taking the valve cover off.

Because the owner lives 40 miles away, having him bring the tractor back to have the head retorqued after he has put some hours on it, is really not an option, although that would be ideal.

I am just finishing doing some other work on the tractor, so I guess that I better warm it up again and pull the valve cover just to be sure.  😞

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Red Tech said:

Thank you all for your replies to my question as to if it is still necessary to retorque head gaskets.  I had hoped that there would have been improvements in head gaskets in the last 40 years that would have made retorquing unnecessary.  Based on your experience, apparently I should still retorque head gaskets.

I put a Fel-Pro gasket set in a 706 gas tractor.  After running the tractor for a while to warm up the engine, I tried the head bolts that were outside of the valve cover; they did not move.  I was thinking that those under the valve cover would be the same, but maybe not.  I was trying to avoid the hassle of taking the valve cover off.

Because the owner lives 40 miles away, having him bring the tractor back to have the head retorqued after he has put some hours on it, is really not an option, although that would be ideal.

I am just finishing doing some other work on the tractor, so I guess that I better warm it up again and pull the valve cover just to be sure.  😞

Since your doing work for others that would be a good idea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the gas tractor is not as critical. on them 282 diesels  you will get between 1/8 -1/4 of a turn more on the bolts.  replaced a head gasket on my friends tractor that had that junky felpro gasket used when it was rebuilt. it did not get a retorque and i had to replace the gasket on this new engine job.  he watched when i retorqued it and said "i would have never thought you get that much for gain on the bolts by retorquing". its just a proven fact. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have a question about retorqueing the bolts. Do any of you break them loose one at a time and then bring them back up to specs or do you just see if they will move. I have found that if you just try them often they will not move yet if you break them loose and then come back up that they will indeed tighten down some more. I mark the bolt with a paint stick so I can see how much they turn. Just wondering what most do here. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/30/2021 at 6:23 PM, ksfarmdude said:

The compression loss is miniscule unless its ran for years with a blown head gasket and not all cylinders would be affected chances are it was sipping oil to begin with

I took a 350 Chevy apart that had zero compression on #3 and #5 cylinders.

It was only a head gasket out.

About a 1/2# of gasket was missing between the two cylinders.

I assumed it should have shown some compression, but it did not.

New head gaskets and it ran like a dream.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/29/2021 at 9:55 PM, ksfarmdude said:

Those engines I use copper coat on for sure on they are notoriously known for headgasket problems not enough head bolts

I love that stuff in the rattle can! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I worked as a mechanic for IH in the early 70's.

I cannot remember replacing a head gasket on a 560D.

The tractors were more than 10 years old at the time and if they had issues, we would have seen it.

A lot of them were in use as the farmers "Main Horse" and they were not being pampered.

Old age is more the culprit today.

If you have a leaker, send it to the machinist so it is flat and perfect before reinstalling.

I always wiped the block/head with carb cleaner so no oil or grease was present.

I handled the gasket by the inner cylinder rings so I never touched the mating surface of the gasket.

Any oil will prevent it from wanting to seal.

Then torque the head in at least three steps to get to the desired torque.

Then run it about 100 hours then retorque the head and reset the valves.

There is never time to do it right but always time to do it over.

Verify the pump timing is correct also while you are at it.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Diesel Doctor said:

I worked as a mechanic for IH in the early 70's.

I cannot remember replacing a head gasket on a 560D.

The tractors were more than 10 years old at the time and if they had issues, we would have seen it.

A lot of them were in use as the farmers "Main Horse" and they were not being pampered.

Old age is more the culprit today.

If you have a leaker, send it to the machinist so it is flat and perfect before reinstalling.

I always wiped the block/head with carb cleaner so no oil or grease was present.

I handled the gasket by the inner cylinder rings so I never touched the mating surface of the gasket.

Any oil will prevent it from wanting to seal.

Then torque the head in at least three steps to get to the desired torque.

Then run it about 100 hours then retorque the head and reset the valves.

There is never time to do it right but always time to do it over.

Verify the pump timing is correct also while you are at it.

 

Sleeve stand out above deck is very critical on those engines also for a good seal 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

 

Verify the pump timing is correct also while you are at it.

 

Yes! I have spent all of my life around the D-282.  This spring I replaced a completely compression-leaking blown head gasket in a high houred late 560D for a customer. The engine was in less than desireable condition, but they just like to spread manure and odd jobs with it for fun. Maybe 50 hours per year. The deck and head were true, so installed a new IHC gasket with Permatex Copper Coat on all surfaces. I had not heard it run until after the repair. I shut it down as soon as I started it for the first time... hammering and pinging like crazy! The injection timing was WAY early! I re-set the timing and sent it on it's way. I saw them not long ago and they said that it starts and runs so much better now. I did not re-torque it. I used the same "Copper-coat" spray-a-gasket on the family 656D twenty years ago without re-torquing and it is still good.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/4/2021 at 4:03 PM, Farmall Doctor said:

Yes! I have spent all of my life around the D-282.  This spring I replaced a completely compression-leaking blown head gasket in a high houred late 560D for a customer. The engine was in less than desireable condition, but they just like to spread manure and odd jobs with it for fun. Maybe 50 hours per year. The deck and head were true, so installed a new IHC gasket with Permatex Copper Coat on all surfaces. I had not heard it run until after the repair. I shut it down as soon as I started it for the first time... hammering and pinging like crazy! The injection timing was WAY early! I re-set the timing and sent it on it's way. I saw them not long ago and they said that it starts and runs so much better now. I did not re-torque it. I used the same "Copper-coat" spray-a-gasket on the family 656D twenty years ago without re-torquing and it is still good.

yep, light  pulling and nothing may show up.... u try that in the 660 under a heavy pull and that gasket  will never last. i went through lots of 660 gaskets. soon as u make em work hard you will be getting bubbles in rad. and felfro is the worst gasket.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, rustred said:

yep, light  pulling and nothing may show up.... u try that in the 660 under a heavy pull and that gasket  will never last. i went through lots of 660 gaskets. soon as u make em work hard you will be getting bubbles in rad. and felfro is the worst gasket.

Whatever!! We pulled an 8 row corn planter, full of fertilizer, and saddle tanks full of spray on the 656. 3rd gear, wide open throttle. Then in the fall it went on the 4 furrow plow. Then in winter on the #80 snowblower…which it still does every winter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...