Jump to content

Damaged 1486 hydraulics by mistaking open system for closed?


Gmoney44
 Share

Recommended Posts

I feel pretty stupid realizing this after owning my 1486 for 15 years but I guess better late than never. 265014U19559 is on the tag. I had Low pressure 3 years ago on my remotes, bought services manuals to troubleshoot/fix. I don't know much about hydraulics but with a manual and some curse words I can fix 65% of issues on my equipment.  Used 1st set of digits to reference serial numbers instead of after the U, Thought I had a Closed system. Rebuild MCV and changed pump, problem fixed. I Don't put many hours on this tractor. Last month bought a set of jd fold down disks to chop up my property. Reading disks manual it you says need a closed system to put remotes in float position for wings or it could damage tractor. Well after chopped for about 2 hours with remote bungee corded in float position I suddenly lost power to remotes, after looking over my manual again I now figure out I have a open system. Only getting about 750# max out of remotes. SO what all did I most likely fry and where's the best place to start looking? Any help would be appreciated for a illiterate shade tree mechanic. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you were in float position I highly doubt the disc mower had anything to do with it in float there's no pressure being applied Sounds like the problem was coming sooner of later regardless of mowing , I'd start out checking the pressure relief valve first then proceed to the pump for inspection sounds like maybe a blowed O-ring 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The float position should have a detent and shouldn’t require a bungee cord to hold it in. Are you sure that you weren’t deadheading the hydraulics in the down position the entire time?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The valves are double acting, with float.   Meaning: up raises the wings (or implement) with pressure, down lowers the wings with pressure (think a wing folded 180 over, you first have to push it up & over to unfold it), float is further down, clear to the bottom of the slot, and that allows the cylinder to release on all sides, letting the wing/implement drop freely.

If your lever linkages are worn, even pushing the lever clear into the float position can still have the spool stay in "down", rather than float.   This would cause the pump to stay under pressure.    I had to replace the "L hook" linkages on my 1486, (and bush the spool holes) because they were worn enough at only 4000 hours It would no longer go into raise or float.    

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the 3rd set of those "L" hooks on my 1486, also rebuilt the holes in the spools once. I'm also guessing you were not in float. Swap relief valves if you have something else to swap with, quick, simple, and easy way to check that. If not cured probly need pump/sealing/o-ring repairs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, sd186man said:

How do you guys like to rebush or repair the spool holes?

I bought a set of carbon rods and welded a slotted hole for our 1586 once . Worked ok, been nicer today as I only had a stick welder back then

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/26/2021 at 12:00 PM, sd186man said:

How do you guys like to rebush or repair the spool holes?

I drilled the holes oversize and pressed in a sleeve from a roller chain.   Just knock apart a chain link and you have two sizes (inner sleeve and outer roller) for every chain size. Don't remember the chain size, or which piece I used, but the hardened rollers on chain make great sleeves to repair worn holes, if you can find one the right size.    I remember one fit the new L hook pin really well.    I think I actually did this "in place" on the tractor, only hard part is getting the right size drill for the bushing to press into (drill the hole out one drill step size at a time).  I used a C clamp to press them in.   Once they were pressed in, I used a cutoff wheel on an angle grinder to trim the excess length.     I ended up with a "better than new" hardened sleeve permanent repair.  Worked very well.  

I remember using the same technique to repair  the advance weights on a Oliver governor once....made the engine run much smoother! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...