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JimG
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Describe your problem. 

I would put my money down on the mechanics here way more than any on a green forum. 

 

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11 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Describe your problem. 

I would put my money down on the mechanics here way more than any on a green forum. 

 

they drink the cool aide   answer ....proprietary repairs only  just bring it to the local stealer for $3K they tell, whats not wrong

specialist diagnosis $2k

repair $4K

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31 minutes ago, JimG said:

I know this is the wrong forum but does anyone know of a good john deere forum.

I am having power steering problems on a early 4630 tractor.

Thanks

Okay it’s a early one. What does it do? If it wanders and steers past the end. Meaning you hold the wheel deadend turned one way and you can turn wheel slowly. There is a sprc in service manual for leakage but if you can turn wheel past end and tractor wanders. The seals in your bolster are leaking by. Make sure it’s a early tractor they would have the 4020 style steering sector and they give problems. If it is newer tractor other stuff applies.Do your hydraulics work good? Explain your problem I will tell you what’s wrong.

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Just now, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

Later style has the “brick” like this in front of the firewall. This is on a 4430 that we have apart right now replacing all the steering lines in the dash. 
1F9F5872-175D-4D76-8E89-3591C5E2BE65.thumb.jpeg.200e61ef975ebc8c1966201c95fe02b4.jpeg

I have a new brick for a 4430 we never put on. Over the years brake and clutch shavings wear them. That brick spits high pressure steering and low pressure steering wheel activation. If high pressure goes to low it blows your return hoses off all the time. Then the valves stick you steer one way then.

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1 minute ago, dale560 said:

I have a new brick for a 4430 we never put on. Over the years brake and clutch shavings wear them. That brick spits high pressure steering and low pressure steering wheel activation. If high pressure goes to low it blows your return hoses off all the time. Then the valves stick you steer one way then.

The last one I put on was probably 10-12 years ago and it was almost $900 then. Deere lists it at over $2,000 now. 

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1 hour ago, JimG said:

I know this is the wrong forum but does anyone know of a good john deere forum.

I am having power steering problems on a early 4630 tractor.

Thanks

  If nobody can help here then go to Yesterday's Tractors and click on the John Deere page.  There are very knowledgeable posters on there who were dealer mechanics back in the day.  Tim S is real good on steering systems.  Guys have sent him components for him to rebuild.

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5 minutes ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

Over the years brake and clutch shavings wear them.

This is true, and I do not know if John Deere even offered a kit to rebuild them, as both dealers I worked at just replaced them, which did not take all that long.

The problem you would run into rebuilding the old style would be finding someone, especially at a dealer, who knows how to do it.

As far as I know, the special tool needed to set the valves was part of the special tools package that came out when the 3010 and 4010 came out and was used up to some time during the 4030-4630 production.

IIR, one valve has to be set to open slightly earlier than the other to make it steer properly

John Deere JDH-3D Steering Valve Adjustment Tool

This one tool can be used on 6 different tractors for adjusting the steering valve.  A must have for any tractor mechanic that works on John Deere series tractors listed below (and possibly other models): 3020, 4000, 4020, 4320, 4520, and 4620.  This tool was made from solid piece of 1018 Cold Rolled Steel. It comes with two bolts and locking jam nuts as seen in the photos.  It was machined on a CNC mill from the same  specifications from an original tool, JDH-3D (replaces JDH-3C).
889390.jpg.5faacfb183c1f37f68a331345d3ed430.jpg3143924.jpg.c29b1c9c35ae011a9e6cbe36f34ff302.jpg
 
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2 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

This is true, and I do not know if John Deere even offered a kit to rebuild them, as both dealers I worked at just replaced them, which did not take all that long.

The problem you would run into rebuilding the old style would be finding someone, especially at a dealer, who knows how to do it.

As far as I know, the special tool needed to set the valves was part of the special tools package that came out when the 3010 and 4010 came out and was used up to some time during the 4030-4630 production.

IIR, one valve has to be set to open slightly earlier than the other to make it steer properly

John Deere JDH-3D Steering Valve Adjustment Tool

This one tool can be used on 6 different tractors for adjusting the steering valve.  A must have for any tractor mechanic that works on John Deere series tractors listed below (and possibly other models): 3020, 4000, 4020, 4320, 4520, and 4620.  This tool was made from solid piece of 1018 Cold Rolled Steel. It comes with two bolts and locking jam nuts as seen in the photos.  It was machined on a CNC mill from the same  specifications from an original tool, JDH-3D (replaces JDH-3C).
889390.jpg.5faacfb183c1f37f68a331345d3ed430.jpg3143924.jpg.c29b1c9c35ae011a9e6cbe36f34ff302.jpg
 

I got a rebuilt old style for a very early 4230 from Abilene Machine. I was sure it would never work because of my history with them, but it’s been in there for close to twenty years now. I don’t know if they still offer them or not. These salvage yard “rebuilds” seem to be a real gamble. Sometimes they have a reputable shop do the job and sometimes Jim Bob is back there doing who knows what. 

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Out of necessity I have rebuilt probably 100 of those old style hand pump valve combos. 4020s will break the bottom cast cover dumping oil like a son of a gun. Probably close to a 100 front motor units on jds also or more. 4440jds will bust the casting on the steering motor end when used on a loader. Cracks between operating and feedback piston. Changed about 10 of those. First one was on a fairly low housed 4440 steering casting was 2000 back in 1990. 

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Just now, Cdfarabaugh said:

Am I the only one who thinks Deere really overcomplicated a steering system?  (Just like SCV's too) 

No your not but that is what they came up with. By the mid 70s they had it modernized. But to split high pressure hyd and low pressure operating or signal from hand pump in that brick caused problems after they wore.

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Seeing the high parts prices and special tools needed, guess I'm glad we didn't fix the steering on the Money Pit 4010.  It had worn slick 3-rib 9.5Lx15's when we bought it. I drove it home about 15-16 miles, and wore thru 3-4 of the 6 plys on each tire. Dad made it about 4 miles of a 20 mile trip to have it tuned up at his favorite Deere dealer, hee blew a frt tire, spent rest of the day getting two new 11Lx15's mounted and on tractor.  Then about a year later the reason for the fast wear showed itself, inside end of right tierod fell off the tierod stud at the start of a round plowing, wheel turned full lock in the furrow, but somehow made it home. A large, about 3/4" flat washer sawed in half and welded under the ball on the stud fixes them, we did all 4. 

     What really got irritating was in 1/4 mile rows the steering knob would move about a half a turn, plowing, discing, cultivating, whatever gear or speed,  the spinner was never in the same place.  And yes, half mile rows it made a complete 360 degree turn.  Seemed like it was getting worse too.  I ran some REALLY tired 4020's that didn't have the problem. 

       Tim S posts pictures of his Deere hydraulic test bench.  I'd trust him over somebody at a dealer that's only done a few.

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Here is picture of steering motor. The O ring seals on the 10 series failed sooner than the later tractors. But in all reality the finger tip steering of the 10 series put the other mfgs on notice. Used to fix these steering motors every week 

E8DF74BC-5F8D-41C1-A066-72CED743755A.png

4CBA938C-226B-4B91-852E-12891D0F498C.png

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17 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

This is true, and I do not know if John Deere even offered a kit to rebuild them, as both dealers I worked at just replaced them, which did not take all that long.

The problem you would run into rebuilding the old style would be finding someone, especially at a dealer, who knows how to do it.

As far as I know, the special tool needed to set the valves was part of the special tools package that came out when the 3010 and 4010 came out and was used up to some time during the 4030-4630 production.

IIR, one valve has to be set to open slightly earlier than the other to make it steer properly

John Deere JDH-3D Steering Valve Adjustment Tool

This one tool can be used on 6 different tractors for adjusting the steering valve.  A must have for any tractor mechanic that works on John Deere series tractors listed below (and possibly other models): 3020, 4000, 4020, 4320, 4520, and 4620.  This tool was made from solid piece of 1018 Cold Rolled Steel. It comes with two bolts and locking jam nuts as seen in the photos.  It was machined on a CNC mill from the same  specifications from an original tool, JDH-3D (replaces JDH-3C).
889390.jpg.5faacfb183c1f37f68a331345d3ed430.jpg3143924.jpg.c29b1c9c35ae011a9e6cbe36f34ff302.jpg
 

I made my own adjusting plate to repair my dads 3010. The IT manual had the specs and the adjustment procedure. The first time I worked on it I just used keystock and feeler gauges. After making the tool and buying a Dial indicator things went much better the next time. 

Things can get real interesting with that system if you have an internal leak and are going down a road when the steering unit gets to the end of its travel and resynchronizes. The front wheels will go from straight forward to full turn without any input from the driver or any warning. More fun than a carnival ride.

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1 hour ago, Owen Aaland said:

I made my own adjusting plate to repair my dads 3010. The IT manual had the specs and the adjustment procedure. The first time I worked on it I just used keystock and feeler gauges. After making the tool and buying a Dial indicator things went much better the next time. 

Things can get real interesting with that system if you have an internal leak and are going down a road when the steering unit gets to the end of its travel and resynchronizes. The front wheels will go from straight forward to full turn without any input from the driver or any warning. More fun than a carnival ride.

Dad put a 4020 lp tractor and grinder on its side in the ditch with this issue when I wasn't very old. He was banged up but ok. That was the end of that 4020. We kept the 4020 he bought new in 65, the year I was born, till I was in junior high or maybe just in high school.

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7 hours ago, Cdfarabaugh said:

Am I the only one who thinks Deere really overcomplicated a steering system?  (Just like SCV's too) 

You should see the steering system on a 544C front end loader.

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2 hours ago, TractormanMike.mb said:

You should see the steering system on a 544C front end loader.

Oh I know all about it.  I really wonder what crossed Deeres mind whenever they pretty much marketed the most complex tractors possible before stuff really was needed to be complex.  

The hydraulic system always makes me wonder.  Closed center hydraulics really weren't a necessity in ag tractors whatsoever until vacuum meter planters came out.  Other than that? Farmers just needed stuff to go up and down and not get their arm torn off hitting a dead furrow with good power steering.  

Did their stuff work good when it worked?  No doubt but it's literally quadruple the headaches and cost to repair compared to similar vintage equipment?  

On an IH of similar vintage biggest hydraulic problem is usually needed an MCV pump, relief valve, or a leaking hand pump.  Pretty cheap easy stuff to tackle by comparison. 

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1 hour ago, Cdfarabaugh said:

Oh I know all about it.  I really wonder what crossed Deeres mind whenever they pretty much marketed the most complex tractors possible before stuff really was needed to be complex.  

The hydraulic system always makes me wonder.  Closed center hydraulics really weren't a necessity in ag tractors whatsoever until vacuum meter planters came out.  Other than that? Farmers just needed stuff to go up and down and not get their arm torn off hitting a dead furrow with good power steering.  

Did their stuff work good when it worked?  No doubt but it's literally quadruple the headaches and cost to repair compared to similar vintage equipment?  

On an IH of similar vintage biggest hydraulic problem is usually needed an MCV pump, relief valve, or a leaking hand pump.  Pretty cheap easy stuff to tackle by comparison. 

Lots of younger people say this. If you ask my dad if you need finger tip steering, he will tell you that you absolutely do. If we were still farming with pre 4010 technology he would have to quit. With all this stuff he will be able to keep going, God willing. 

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