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IH 715 combine


Big Bud guy
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That is a nice 715

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1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

This one is quick tach Im sure but that doesn't mean too much because I can show you a 403 that has a 810 header and newer feeder house added on.  

The 403 must have had it changed over then they all had the intergral feeder house and header 

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20 minutes ago, ksfarmdude said:

The 403 must have had it changed over then they all had the intergral feeder house and header 

Here is a thread showing the combine.  Almost sounds like there was a feeder house kit offered to enable using a 800 series header on a 03 series.  JD did the same thing.  When they introduced the 00 series, JD came out with the "intermediate" feederhouse which enabled a combine like a 105 to run any header up to a 900 series platform or 40 series corn header or newer.  

 

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1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

Here is a thread showing the combine.  Almost sounds like there was a feeder house kit offered to enable using a 800 series header on a 03 series.  JD did the same thing.  When they introduced the 00 series, JD came out with the "intermediate" feederhouse which enabled a combine like a 105 to run any header up to a 900 series platform or 40 series corn header or newer.  

 

Dad considered putting a 915 feeder house on his 503 to use 800 series heads. Ended up just getting a 915.

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The 403 Hillside was offered well into the 15 series production run. Not sure how long it stayed though. They were in my 1972 buyers guide. 

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2 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

Straw spreaders, knob tires, and gear drive were all still common around here during the late 70s early 80s.  Some guys were still running spreaders on 9600s and 2188s.  Straw wasn't too much of a problem back when the average yield was only 20-30 bpa.  Gear drives were still common.  But mostly on Massey and smaller combines.  There were some White combines in the neighborhood and they were all bare bones. Lot of JD 6600/7700s were gear drive but mostly the early ones.  Course the 4400 was only gear drive.  There was none around here but they would be about the same size as a 715.  I did run across a farmer once who ran two 7720s that were gear drive.  I didn't even know still offered that option on the 20 series. I've only seen one other 715 with a hydro so I would consider those uncommon. I once laid eyes on a gas 715 with a chain drive cylinder and gear drive.  That was about as stripped as they got.  Our 760 which we bought in 1979 new was gear drive and I know of more 700 series with gear drive then hydros.  MF 510s were made all the way up to 1978 and guys around here were still buying them.  But I have never laid eyes on a hydro 510 although I know they are out there.  Our 1981 8820 has knob tires too.  Don't know why either but I have seen them on 9600s but not too many.  

Interesting...I bet our way of farming at that time was rather similar to yours; mostly small grain at that time, with a little corn and sunflowers for fall crop. Soybeans weren't even thought of back then. Biggest difference was probably that fact that a large part of our small grain was swathed and then you needed a pickup header for the windrows. Between summerfallow and acres that were "idled" or "set aside" due to government programs, we grew a lot of winter wheat at that time.

One big reason I remember everybody having straw choppers at that time on combines was that I was the poor SOB that got to help dig out a chopper that was plugged up between the back of the straw racks and the chopper itself. Usually happened on the hottest day of summer it seemed like. Also, we had hogs so Dad always had to bale the straw for the hogs....pulled many a chopper off the back end of a combine so we could leave straw in the windrow for baling. There were some combines with spreaders around here, but it seemed like most conventional combines had choppers.

As far as hydrostats, there were still several gear drive/belt drive machines around here as well. Seemed like the Massey 760s either had a V8/Hydro or a 354 Perkins/gear drive...it was about a 50/50 split. My neighbor had one of each....he always said the V8/Hydro 760 took 1/3 more fuel than the gear drive machine...and didn't really get any more work done. He thought the only place the hydro machine was better was in corn. Remember a few 66/7720 Titans with Posi-Torque/gear drive, although most were hydro models. On the other hand, I can't hardly remember very many 66/7700s with hydros, either.

As far as 715s, most around here were earlier models, some with gas engines, most were gear drive. By the late 1970s a 715 was getting too small for this area; after all, a 715 was more or less a rebadged 403 from the 1960s, which was more or less a rebadged/updated 151 from the late 1950s. In typical IH fashion, they rode that horse for a long time. I remember when many farmers were getting pushed out of business by either the bank or FmHA in the mid-1980s, there were a LOT of 715s on farm sales.

One other oddity I noticed on your 715 was the swamp cooler/water cooler instead of factory AC. By the mid-1970s there were very few new machines with factory cabs that didn't have the factory AC system. Swamp coolers were OK as long as you didn't have any humidity; on a humid day, they made you feel worse inside the cab than outside the cab.

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1 hour ago, IHhogfarmer said:

The 403 Hillside was offered well into the 15 series production run. Not sure how long it stayed though. They were in my 1972 buyers guide. 

JD did the same thing.  The 95 Hillside was made a couple of years into the production of the 6600/7700.

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2 hours ago, SDman said:

Interesting...I bet our way of farming at that time was rather similar to yours; mostly small grain at that time, with a little corn and sunflowers for fall crop. Soybeans weren't even thought of back then. Biggest difference was probably that fact that a large part of our small grain was swathed and then you needed a pickup header for the windrows.

Actually here from the 60s up to the 90s most grain here was swathed too.  I had neighbor who bought a new 7700 in the mid 70s with a pickup header and straight header.  He ran that combine up to 4,000 hrs and then sold it to my cousin.  He got a brand new 15 year old straight header because my neighbor never used it.  At one time we had 3 swathers.  Two Versatile 400s and a IH 4000.  Traded all three off for two JD 2280s and then traded those two off for a new Macdon Premier when those came out.  

 

 

2 hours ago, SDman said:

On the other hand, I can't hardly remember very many 66/7700s with hydros, either.

I guess like everything else it took awhile for new tech to catch on.  My uncle had a gas 7700 with a hydro.  It and another 7700 diesel locally are the only flat screen ones I have seen with a hydro.  On the other hand, I have never seen a 7700 Turbo with posi torque.  Seems like all the dealers ordered them with hydros since they had the extra power.  The very few 6600s I have seen didn't have hydros either.  

 

Quote

As far as 715s, most around here were earlier models, some with gas engines, most were gear drive. By the late 1970s a 715 was getting too small for this area; after all, a 715 was more or less a rebadged 403 from the 1960s, which was more or less a rebadged/updated 151 from the late 1950s. In typical IH fashion, they rode that horse for a long time. I remember when many farmers were getting pushed out of business by either the bank or FmHA in the mid-1980s, there were a LOT of 715s on farm sales.

One other oddity I noticed on your 715 was the swamp cooler/water cooler instead of factory AC. By the mid-1970s there were very few new machines with factory cabs that didn't have the factory AC system. Swamp coolers were OK as long as you didn't have any humidity; on a humid day, they made you feel worse inside the cab than outside the cab.

715s were too small for us too but I think my neighbor bought this one out of the area.  He bought it used and ran it along side his MF 860.  The swamp cooler is unusual because most combines around here had factory AC by the mid 70s including MF 510s.  I did have one neighbor brag to me once he put 3,000 hrs on a 6600 that had no AC.  He was one of those guys that the more miserable he was the funner it was.  We don't get much humidity over here so swamp coolers worked alright for what they were.  The one and only time I drove something with a swamp cooler was a Versatile 400.  I don't know what brand it was but the horizontal drum was suppose to rotate in a water trough but the gear teeth were stripped.  So I carried a couple of water jugs with me and as long as I got up on top of the cab and soaked that drum with water every 2-3 hours, it kept me cool.  Not freeze you out AC cool but cool enough it wasn't miserable.  

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Funny about the old guys that came of age during the depression. My dad thought a umbrella was not needed on his old D6 pulling a combine 3 months of the year. One year his brother just put one on, he got over it used 20 years or more.   

No combine's with cabs here until the late 60's.  Some thought they where tuff, they didn't need AC. Some of the early after market cabs I saw on JD 95H's with a big fan and 2 door, you might not get heat stork. One guy got a new GH Gleaner he would just close the door going one way open it the other. Two or 3 days it was back in town to get a AC unit on the top of the cab.

I have old NH 3 wheel swather and after market cab the had a swamp cooler. Was not unhappy when I had header drive shaft failure and broke the front window out. I knew of one JD 95H with it told of stopping to squeegee the windows when you got to far ahead of the leveler and tipped the water tank up top to far.

I have seen one JD 6602 (hillside)  with out a cab . It was real close to the coast that rarely sees 90 degrees.

The IH dealer retired in 82 or 83 and never had a 1470 to sell that I know of. But the IH guys running 403's had cab on them and AC by the 1980's.

 

Good luck to you getting a few tons cut with the 715.

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i wore my 715 out but it would make a a$$ out of my cousins G gleaner in milo or corn but come wheat it was the other way around. Had to put a new radiator on near the end and it cost about what i got out of the combine. One thing i kept it inside its whole life as it had been inside before i purchased it. When i purchased my 1440 i really wanted a 1460 but i could not find a shedded one so i got the 1440 that had lived in a shed. 

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On 10/3/2021 at 8:34 PM, Big Bud guy said:

Here is a thread showing the combine.  Almost sounds like there was a feeder house kit offered to enable using a 800 series header on a 03 series.  JD did the same thing.  When they introduced the 00 series, JD came out with the "intermediate" feederhouse which enabled a combine like a 105 to run any header up to a 900 series platform or 40 series corn header or newer.  

 

The IH "intermediate feeder house"(or whatever IH called it) actually had its own parts book in IH's parts system. Here's the information on one of the first pages of that parts book. Refers to 4/503 machines as well as the older 6/7/8/915s that didn't have the Quick-Tach headers yet(before 1974 production). That 810 on your machine looks to be about the same vintage as the combine.

800 series headers.PNG

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9 hours ago, ray54 said:

 

I have seen one JD 6602 (hillside)  with out a cab . It was real close to the coast that rarely sees 90 degrees.

Fun fact, the 6602 was not available with a factory cab to start with.  A long time ago when I took a trip into eastern WA, I saw several 6602s with aftermarket cabs and I couldn’t figure out why.  Then I picked up an early 6602 brochure and saw JD didn’t offer one initially

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On 10/3/2021 at 10:45 PM, IHhogfarmer said:

The 403 Hillside was offered well into the 15 series production run. Not sure how long it stayed though. They were in my 1972 buyers guide. 

  The 1978 Buyer's Guide shows it with the designation 453.  

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1 hour ago, 766 Man said:

  The 1978 Buyer's Guide shows it with the designation 453.  

‘72 is the newest one I have. So that is new info to me

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Almost makes me want to try running  some beans... I have a sweetheart of an old Gas 615  identical to the one above that lost its shed spot this summer, drove it outside cant even get scrap money on CL. Going to have to drive it to another farm and get it back under roof.

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Why did IH not offer a 15 series hillside? Any guesses or confirmed facts?

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