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Deere Labor Contract


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5 hours ago, Jacka said:

I find it interesting that all the woes of the world or at least some of the people responding to this thread blame the workers for wanting a better life,pay package,retirement etc.. to them not getting their parts or equipment. I don't work for them,wouldn't even think about it so I don't have a dog in this fight.

John Deere is to blame also, they could have settled this I bet without a strike and things never would have been disrupted.Its not like it's a wildcat strike,they knew this day was coming the day they signed the old contract. 

How about blaming John Deere,they're the ones selling million dollar combines and you farmers had to sue them for the right to get the software to fix your own equipment. 

I'm not blaming the workers for wanting a better life. JD has to do several things. They have to stay profitable. They have to pay dividends to share holders and they have to be competitive on the market. So it depends on what the workers wanted as to who's fault it is. I recall a strike by coal miners in WV back in the 70's/80'? when they finally settled most of the miners knew they would never make back what they lost by being on strike. 

2 hours ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Legally strikers cannot block entrance into and out of plant. Any contractor or trucking company that is union will typically not cross picket line.  So I belive your statement to be inaccurate or misinformed. 

Sense when have striking union members been real concerned about the law? It's illegal to damage the vehicles of workers who choose to work yet it's common at striking plants. It's illegal to threaten or to beat a person who decides to cross the picket line too yet it happens.

Before I retired from the Army I have a very high regard for the American worker. After I entered the civilian work force my coworkers quickly destroyed that regard.

 

Rick

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7 hours ago, Jacka said:

How about blaming John Deere,they're the ones selling million dollar combines and you farmers had to sue them for the right to get the software to fix your own equipment. 

That doesn't sound like a desperate diversion or anything

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2 hours ago, oldtanker said:

Sense when have striking union members been real concerned about the law? It's illegal to damage the vehicles of workers who choose to work yet it's common at striking plants. It's illegal to threaten or to beat a person who decides to cross the picket line too yet it happens.

Before I retired from the Army I have a very high regard for the American worker. After I entered the civilian work force my coworkers quickly destroyed that regard.

Drones and cell phone cameras as well as mounted cameras. This ain't the old days. I doubt very much of the behavior you talk about would fly today but maybe I'm wrong. 

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10 hours ago, supermpuller said:

Wife had cancer for 23 years before she passed away, total cost was over 3 million, damn near lost the farm 3 times. So if you have family members who need medical issues that cost in the thousands , which one do you pick to save?

SUPERMPULLER - Watching your wife live with cancer for 23 years must have been terribly painful for you.  You and your family have my sincerest sympathys.  Modern medicine can do some fantastic things today, but at a huge cost.

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8 hours ago, Art From Coleman said:

When you stop and think about it, the strike could not have come at a better time for John Deere.

While the UAW employees are on strike, they are off the payroll, and are not building equipment that cannot be sold due to "supply chain issues".  Why keep building machines that will only be moved from the end of the assembly line to be parked on the property awaiting parts and/or transportation, as are the 100's of CIH combines setting outside the CNH factory at Grand Island, NE?

Would the workers have preferred to been laid off, with no guarantee of being called back, or will they prefer to settle for what ever management offers, and stay employed?  If and when parts and transportation becomes available, this strike could last a long time, just as getting the current inventory out to the dealers and owners could take a long time.

And I doubt if JD is really in that much of a bind, since ALL the competition face the same shortages, along with the fact that the  European manufactures do not have that large of a dealer presence in the United States, along with the shipping problems of getting their machines to the US.

What may well happen is that, when the new contract is approved, the UAW will raise the union dues in order to rebuild the strike fund, thus taking away part of anything the workers have gained under the new agreement.

I would concur with your current assessment of Deere's rational to stop production. I'm sure Deere has penciled out how long they are willing to sit. Let the parts accumulate for a X amount of time,sign the contract, go back to work. Making equipment and not being able to ship it isn't good for any companies bottom line. How many machines are shipped to dealers but still waiting for a part or 2 to finish the build I don't know.

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I was up at the Deere dealer this morning. The woman who is the parts manager there is very worried about the situation. She said that they are running out of a lot of parts that the dealer normally stocks. She said that Deere is not allowing dealers to reorder stock for the dealership. Right now they can only order for a customer. So this means if they run out of something they are not allowed to replenish stock and then they are guaranteed not to have it when someone comes in and wants it. The only thing they can do is emergency order it for you and then it may or may not show up the next day. I wanted to get some M8 flange nuts and they don’t have any and can’t get them. Out of some filters. The parts that I ordered on Friday showed up in a dealer in South Dakota 500 miles from me. One of the parts guys there is 70 years old and he worked at Deere during the strike in 1986 and he said it is already worse than it was then because they were already having so many problems with inventory and the dealer was not where they wanted to be with stock before harvest started. They are stressing out because they know that when guys start coming in there to get parts that can’t be had they know people will take out their frustration on dealership employees. I am very worried for a lot of farms, including my own, around here and what they will do. 

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I don't work in the field of my degree.

My degree is (what was then called) Personnel Management or now, we'd call it Human Resources.

During my senior year, I had a (required) class for Union Negotiations.  It culminated with us dividing into teams (management verses union).  I was the leader of the Management side.  We had something like two hours to hammer out an agreement.

We were the first to leave the room and were done within maybe 30 minutes.  The teacher was floored.  She immediately cornered us and started grilling us on how did we possibly finish so quickly?

We (mainly myself I guess) said we looked at some of their requests.  Some were reasonable, some were not.  We went over the reasonable ones and cleared them (accepted).  We then went to the more difficult ones and proposed what we felt to be fair middle ground solutions.  The other side could see we were operating with good faith so they also operated in good faith.

There were none of the (typical?) us verses them shennagians causing one or both sides to entrench.  We (as management) genuinely adopted the 'lets take care of everyone' attitude.

Seemed to be the honest and fair thing to do.

I have ALWAYS felt that there are at times, there was a 100% need for a Union.  There are also times a Union is 100% NOT needed.  I think it always falls back to the simple Golden Rule philosophy.

 

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52 minutes ago, Coytee said:

I don't work in the field of my degree.

My degree is (what was then called) Personnel Management or now, we'd call it Human Resources.

During my senior year, I had a (required) class for Union Negotiations.  It culminated with us dividing into teams (management verses union).  I was the leader of the Management side.  We had something like two hours to hammer out an agreement.

We were the first to leave the room and were done within maybe 30 minutes.  The teacher was floored.  She immediately cornered us and started grilling us on how did we possibly finish so quickly?

We (mainly myself I guess) said we looked at some of their requests.  Some were reasonable, some were not.  We went over the reasonable ones and cleared them (accepted).  We then went to the more difficult ones and proposed what we felt to be fair middle ground solutions.  The other side could see we were operating with good faith so they also operated in good faith.

There were none of the (typical?) us verses them shennagians causing one or both sides to entrench.  We (as management) genuinely adopted the 'lets take care of everyone' attitude.

Seemed to be the honest and fair thing to do.

I have ALWAYS felt that there are at times, there was a 100% need for a Union.  There are also times a Union is 100% NOT needed.  I think it always falls back to the simple Golden Rule philosophy.

 

What was each of your groups personal stake in the things you agreed upon?

Maybe negotiate over grades?  For every A you hand out you have to also hand out an F.

Common ground is everyone gets a C.  Lets see who agrees to common ground.

Maybe the Leaders gets an A,  the top negotiators get B's  the voters get from B-D, and the F's get to repeat the class.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I was up at the Deere dealer this morning. The woman who is the parts manager there is very worried about the situation. She said that they are running out of a lot of parts that the dealer normally stocks. She said that Deere is not allowing dealers to reorder stock for the dealership. Right now they can only order for a customer. So this means if they run out of something they are not allowed to replenish stock and then they are guaranteed not to have it when someone comes in and wants it. The only thing they can do is emergency order it for you and then it may or may not show up the next day. I wanted to get some M8 flange nuts and they don’t have any and can’t get them. Out of some filters. The parts that I ordered on Friday showed up in a dealer in South Dakota 500 miles from me. One of the parts guys there is 70 years old and he worked at Deere during the strike in 1986 and he said it is already worse than it was then because they were already having so many problems with inventory and the dealer was not where they wanted to be with stock before harvest started. They are stressing out because they know that when guys start coming in there to get parts that can’t be had they know people will take out their frustration on dealership employees. I am very worried for a lot of farms, including my own, around here and what they will do. 

I sent my wife for my parts today, in stock - wasnt much but had it on hand - i dont usually go to deere i just order it online and it comes to my house - will they allow you to order it online and have it shipped to your house ? 

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8 minutes ago, searcyfarms said:

I sent my wife for my parts today, in stock - wasnt much but had it on hand - i dont usually go to deere i just order it online and it comes to my house - will they allow you to order it online and have it shipped to your house ? 

I will qualify it with, as far as I know, nothing can be shipped to a customer direct from the Deere warehouse. Whatever is ordered is pulled and then shipped to a dealer along with everything else that got ordered, which depending on the time of year can be a lot. They sort it out and then they ship it to a customer. I wasn’t sure, so I asked today and they told me that the Deere warehouse staff is also on strike and that office workers are attempting to pull parts. Of course they don’t know what they are doing and there aren’t enough of them, so mistakes are happening. All the parts can’t be pulled, they get shipped to the wrong place, etc. I had some large items that had been ordered before they were on strike so I knew they would be there. 

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Strikes were always SOOOOOO much fun.  I worked in a production support (salaried, non-union) at a UAW represented plant.  Dad worked production.  The last strike I remember we were given orders to report to work unless threatened in some way.  Dad said he'd be more than happy to tell me he'd kick my butt if I crossed the line if I ever wanted a day off.

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3 hours ago, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

I will qualify it with, as far as I know, nothing can be shipped to a customer direct from the Deere warehouse. Whatever is ordered is pulled and then shipped to a dealer along with everything else that got ordered, which depending on the time of year can be a lot. They sort it out and then they ship it to a customer. I wasn’t sure, so I asked today and they told me that the Deere warehouse staff is also on strike and that office workers are attempting to pull parts. Of course they don’t know what they are doing and there aren’t enough of them, so mistakes are happening. All the parts can’t be pulled, they get shipped to the wrong place, etc. I had some large items that had been ordered before they were on strike so I knew they would be there. 

interesting when I go to the deere parts site it lets me pick ship parts or pick up at dealer - maybe they are heading everything off that gets submitted from their website, i have ordered stuff that way in the past to save from driving to a dealer when I can wait and dont need it pronto

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3 hours ago, BoilerRed said:

Strikes were always SOOOOOO much fun.  I worked in a production support (salaried, non-union) at a UAW represented plant.  Dad worked production.  The last strike I remember we were given orders to report to work unless threatened in some way.  Dad said he'd be more than happy to tell me he'd kick my butt if I crossed the line if I ever wanted a day off.

yes they are..............my dad had a big strike back in the 70s and worked up in illinois for like 9 or 10 mos, some of you fellas know it well...........near Ottawa a lil place called Streator - they were putting in a nuclear plant up there so he would work a couple weeks then come home on a weekend, he worked hours upon hours and they got some of it tax free being a federal gig -  i presume its still there - went to chicago and went to the zoo, lake shore air show was that weekend, up sears towers, saw hughs place there on lake shore drive and took in the museum of science/history ? something like that. 

 

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Iirc in Barbara Marsh's Corporate Tragedy the ag companies would.take it in turn to strike one years and the following year if they had been successful the demands and strikes would hit the automotive companies. 

Even to the point that one ag company went on strike as it was their tutn to strike even though someone else was already striking.

(Or something like that? )

 

My point being what goes around deere this year may go atound the automotive companies next year?

Maybe?

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39 minutes ago, Pid 1831 said:

Iirc in Barbara Marsh's Corporate Tragedy the ag companies would.take it in turn to strike one years and the following year if they had been successful the demands and strikes would hit the automotive companies. 

Even to the point that one ag company went on strike as it was their tutn to strike even though someone else was already striking.

(Or something like that? )

 

My point being what goes around deere this year may go atound the automotive companies next year?

Maybe?

Maybe in the 70s that was true I don't know. I do not believe that to be the case this time around. 

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On 10/18/2021 at 5:49 PM, searcyfarms said:

yes they are..............my dad had a big strike back in the 70s and worked up in illinois for like 9 or 10 mos, some of you fellas know it well...........near Ottawa a lil place called Streator - they were putting in a nuclear plant up there so he would work a couple weeks then come home on a weekend, he worked hours upon hours and they got some of it tax free being a federal gig -  i presume its still there - went to chicago and went to the zoo, lake shore air show was that weekend, up sears towers, saw hughs place there on lake shore drive and took in the museum of science/history ? something like that. 

 

That would be the Museum of Science and Industry... coincidentally, there was a farm exhibit there for many years that was sponsored by International Harvester and stocked with many pieces of red equipment; I believe it disappeared for a while, but once again there is a farm exhibit, this time sponsored by Deere.

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On 10/19/2021 at 4:36 AM, iowaboy1965 said:

Maybe in the 70s that was true I don't know. I do not believe that to be the case this time around. 

What the deal is was one company each contract period starts out with negotiations with their labor force. That generally set the tone for what the other companies will settle on with the UAW. IIRC they were for some time unofficially taking turns being the lead company to come up with a contract. Don't know if that's still going on or not.

 

Rick 

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I started my career non union and complained about the unions much like some of you here are doing. They were a hindrance to us trying to work, holding us back. Spoiled babies, I want I want I want. No wonder they all can't find work. 

Years later I accepted another job that was union. All I wanted was better pay, a boss that didn't take all his profits and buy land and houses for himself, but instead give us a raise. I wanted better insurance, as every time my kid went to the doctor I was wondering what I might have to sell to pay the bill. I wanted to be paid for what I could do, not what the boss could see fit. Since I was young he took full advantage of me, didn't matter I could and did do things better than older guys making $10 more than me at times. I find myself somewhere in the middle right now. I would take a pay cut in a second to keep what insurance I've got left. 

The unions faught hard to get what they got, and dont think for a second any trade out there would be making what they make if it weren't for them. Union or not its direct competition for your workers to leave and go there. You have to be paid just good enough it's not really worth leaving to go there. So I think if someone just wants to hang on to what they got what's the big deal? I doubt anyone reading this would take a massive pay cut or lose a major benefit and not go home mad at the world and start looking for another job. Prove me wrong. As for the rest of the shenanigans I couldnt tell you and wont try. 

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Well said Missouri Mule, I've been on both sides of the fence myself and seen how it works.  Crazy how the things you mention in your 2nd paragraph were things I went through when I was younger.

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11 hours ago, 5088 said:

Well said Missouri Mule, I've been on both sides of the fence myself and seen how it works.  Crazy how the things you mention in your 2nd paragraph were things I went through when I was younger.

Thanks. Pros and cons to unions. I had another paragraph wrote out and deleted it. Somethings are better left not said. 

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On 10/16/2021 at 1:13 PM, Dirt_Floor_Poor said:

@oldtanker is right. If they want a share they should invest in the company. If you want a return you have to take a risk. Punching a time clock is not taking a risk.
 

I overnighted some parts yesterday from Deere for Saturday delivery. They didn’t show up. As far as I’m concerned Deere can just fire them all. I pay the bills at John Deere and if the Union doesn’t think it’s important to supply parts now, then I couldn’t care less what happens to them. Farmers don’t forget stuff like this and this is going to leave a bad taste in many customers mouth. Without farmers there is no need for most of John Deere to exist and the union couldn’t care less about what we are supposed to do without the parts we need. 

Did you ever get your parts?

    

   

    

     

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Just saw the local papers are saying Deere and UAW may have reached a tenative 6 yr agreement, it will be read and explained to the rank & file union members in meetings today.  No idea when they might vote on it.

    I'm surprised, They may be back to work before Thanksgiving.

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