Jump to content

Winter storage of equipment


766 Man
 Share

Recommended Posts

  Gonna have to use a potent seed treatment when planting the wheat in the next few days (after the rain stops).  Washing the inside of the drill box is obvious but is there any special oil that works best to coat the box to protect paint and metal?  We always washed the previous drill that is still here but never oiled or otherwise coated the inside of the box and it has serious rust issues in places.  Some people advise to just wash and not bother coating but I do not want another rusty drill.  Both are kept inside most of the time so storage has limited impact.  I think that the seed treatments are just that corrosive especially when there is the least bit of humidity.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have never washed inside of seedbox on a drill. I would think that would be asking for trouble. Would definitely not use oil or you will have problems next year. I always thought keeping it dry and vacuumed out was the best way. Maybe I am wrong.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, ChrisNY said:

Have never washed inside of seedbox on a drill. I would think that would be asking for trouble. Would definitely not use oil or you will have problems next year. I always thought keeping it dry and vacuumed out was the best way. Maybe I am wrong.

  I washed the first drill from the time when we bought it new in 1977 from the advice of others.  I'd be interested in knowing what other farmers do.  The manual for the 8300 drill never had any tips in terms of coating the box at least when you look at storage procedures.  The 8300 gave us good service but was single disc.  I bought the 450 drill to have double discs and depth wheels.  Pretty clean at this point and want to keep it that way.  Unless I buy a no till drill I want those two to carry me to retirement which is a ways off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Used to have a commercial seed treatment license (10yrs ago)and treated soybeans and wheat a fair amount. I never knew any seed treatment to be corrosive. When we cleaned the treater we used dish soap, water, and manpower. Not saying what you have used or have isn’t different but that is my experience. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Used to have a commercial seed treatment license (10yrs ago)and treated soybeans and wheat a fair amount. I never knew any seed treatment to be corrosive. When we cleaned the treater we used dish soap, water, and manpower. Not saying what you have used or have isn’t different but that is my experience. 

  Commercial treatment sticks to the seed quite well.  The seed box treatment not so well.  It seems like the seed box treatment finds all the little crevices and that is where the rust starts.  We always treated the 8300 well in terms of keeping it clean but it still rusted and I want to avoid this with the 450.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is there an advantage to in box vs commercial?  I’m assuming cost is better. I never knew anyone who treated seed like that so I am a bit naive to what you are using. We had a hardener of sorts that we used. It helped. Part of the recipie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No perfect solution. I know guys would spray a lite coat of diesel on the fertilizer box of 8350 JD drills. But that made the seed and fertilizer drop tubes disintegrate.  I had far luck with lots and lots of water in the fert box until I agreed to put ammonia sulfate/21-0-0 on for a neighbor. Just to much salt to that and bits of dust gets in any cracks. Painted rust converter on and stopped the rust. Used a broadcaster from the fertilizer dealer after that.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are just wanting a little corrosion protection after washing, WD40 would be my recommendation. You can buy it in gallon jugs and a refillable sprayer. The "WD" stands for water displacement, and it is a thin petroleum distillate, not a thick oil, which should not cause a sticky build up, it can be hard on some rubber parts over time, so consider that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought maybe WD-40 would work,  but something else that might work better is FLUID FILM. It's a very light viscosity fluid, lanolin based that soaks into extremely small cracks & crevisis.

   I've heard of guys spraying the bodies on their cars & trucks with it for winter road rust prevention. The aeromatic solvent evaporates and leaves a thin layer of lanolin to protect the steel. Lanolin is more like a wax, seeps into places and drys.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, 766 Man said:

  I washed the first drill from the time when we bought it new in 1977 from the advice of others.  I'd be interested in knowing what other farmers do.  The manual for the 8300 drill never had any tips in terms of coating the box at least when you look at storage procedures.  The 8300 gave us good service but was single disc.  I bought the 450 drill to have double discs and depth wheels.  Pretty clean at this point and want to keep it that way.  Unless I buy a no till drill I want those two to carry me to retirement which is a ways off.

Funny that your 8300 rusted like that. We have a 8300 that is a 1977. We are the 3rd owner. The owners manual has it being sold new in March 1977. Then it was either consigned or traded at our Case IH dealer in 1991. Then we bought it at a farm retirement auction in early April 1993.

This is what the inside of our boxes look like. Never had fertilizer in it. Just dusty in the picture. No rust.

20210924_110131.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I were not worried about a oil film I would use fluid film. I use it on my fertilizer buggy and its great stuff. 

If I were worried about it I'd use wd40 or your penetrating oil of choice. I've sprayed kroil on my 510 ih drill for years on the inside with no issues with seed tubes or anything yet. By the time I drag it out of the shed it's pretty well dried away and never an issue with seed hanging up in there. I just spray away until everything I want is coated good. Just my .02

Oh and I always shop vac it out first. Gets most of the dust out. Dont use fertilizer though 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

Funny that your 8300 rusted like that. We have a 8300 that is a 1977. We are the 3rd owner. The owners manual has it being sold new in March 1977. Then it was either consigned or traded at our Case IH dealer in 1991. Then we bought it at a farm retirement auction in early April 1993.

This is what the inside of our boxes look like. Never had fertilizer in it. Just dusty in the picture. No rust.

20210924_110131.jpg

  I still think it started when we used a box treatment for wheat and oats years ago.  I don't know of anybody that treats bin run seed nowadays.  Anyways, I want to do my best not to have rust start on the 450 drill.  Most drills I see at auction don't even look as good as the 8300 regardless of make.  Years ago you could find them where they would be a few decades old and look like they just came new from the dealer.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...