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Propane filters


planejeff
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I have done a long search for propane fuel filters. I've looked and found the the part numbers for a 300 and 400 to be 64400DB. That part number is not going to get you anywhere. So I looked into the 706 and 806 part numbers. The numbers are 64400DC. I thought I managed to find some but again empty. Until I had a refund from Amazon. Which gave me another part number Baldwin PF224. www.877forparts.com

It stated that IH 350-826 it works and MM tractors

I hope this helps for the propane tractor guys!

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Thanks. I hope to get my one 450 back to LP someday

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How does an LP filter work? I assume by the time it leaves the tank it is a gas? Are they more of a charcoal or desiccant filter? Never seen a filter on the small LP stuff I deal with. 

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Never ever seen a filter on an LP tractor truck or anything since its converted to vapor form and controlled by the regulator before being burned Only thing I've seen on them are water trap filters to remove moisture 

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I changed one a hundred years ago on a 560 LP.

Replaced with a genuine IH filter.

It was like a cotton sock filter, if I remember right.

I am not surprised that finding one is this difficult.

I would assume the filter will disintegrate before it gets plugged up.

Propane seems very clean but there can be oils that settle in the tank that can be drained. 

Ethel Mercaptan is the name of the oil that gives propane the stink as pure propane is odorless.

 

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13 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

How does an LP filter work? I assume by the time it leaves the tank it is a gas? Are they more of a charcoal or desiccant filter? Never seen a filter on the small LP stuff I deal with. 

I could be wrong here, but I am pretty sure that the LP leaves the tank as a liquid and then gets vaporized before going to the mixer and finally getting burnt. The small tanks on a tractor would freeze up in cooler weather trying to vaporize enough gas to keep up with the engine demand. Think about how large of tank you need for a  residential generator. The tank has to be big enough to vaporize the liquid and not freeze up. Tractors can’t have a 500 gal tank so we use a vaporizer to do the job. 

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3 minutes ago, 12_Guy said:

I could be wrong here, but I am pretty sure that the LP leaves the tank as a liquid and then gets vaporized before going to the mixer and finally getting burnt. The small tanks on a tractor would freeze up in cooler weather trying to vaporize enough gas to keep up with the engine demand. Think about how large of tank you need for a  residential generator. The tank has to be big enough to vaporize the liquid and not freeze up. Tractors can’t have a 500 gal tank so we use a vaporizer to do the job. 

Good point, one I hadn’t considered 

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1 hour ago, 12_Guy said:

Little too early??

No, just limited experience with LP tractors. I assume large trucks using LP, and forklifts etc, must have filters?

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My 504 lp has dual lines. One liquid and one vapor. I always run vapor. I also run my irrigation engines on vapor. It's much cleaner. It works all winter here.

Vapor may not work during the winters I've seen in Duluth Minnesota.

Thx-Ace 

 

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1 hour ago, acem said:

My 504 lp has dual lines. One liquid and one vapor. I always run vapor. I also run my irrigation engines on vapor. It's much cleaner. It works all winter here.

Vapor may not work during the winters I've seen in Duluth Minnesota.

Thx-Ace 

 

Nah, ya know it twont werk up here in da nort because da ole ice shanty tank freze right up when it get ta dirty below.

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Propane boils, turns to a gas (vapor), at -43 below zero.

The closer to -43 below, the less the propane wants to boil and vaporize.

You can theoretically carry liquid propane in an open bucket at -43 below.

So without a vaporizer, you could run out of vaporized gas, especially if working the engine hard in the super cold weather.

The vaporizer insures enough vapor is present in conditions when a lot of propane is needed.

In essence, only the liquid tap should be open as that runs liquid to the vaporizer.

But both the vapor and liquid line feeds to the point ahead of the filter

However, due to engine heat, the liquid will vaporize in the lines and become a vapor.

The regulator accepts either liquid or vapor and send it to the mixer (carburetor) to be metered to the engine.

It does not matter if liquid or vapor is filtered through the filter.

The main goals is the filtering of the LPG.

But propane is very clean and I have never heard of a propane filter plugging.

Many are very old and original equipment.

These could fail in the future but how long they will run is anybody's guess.

Having a spare may be a good idea, if you can find one.

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15 minutes ago, ksfarmdude said:

I sure as heck won't be outside running a dang propane tractor at 43 below Zero

You are not the only smart one staying in the house at that temperature.

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Interesting topic and explanation from Diesel Doctor. When I was in seed production we had heaters in a warehouse and 2x 1,000 gallon tanks to supply them. In very cold weather if they were below a certain level, 50-60% can’t remember for sure, they wouldn’t vaporize enough to keep heaters supplied. How does tank level affect this? I assume pressure affects heat in the tank?

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Screenshot_20210925-094540_Chrome.thumb.jpg.5abef8e78a5958affbecc017077788e0.jpgThe wetted surface inside the tank is what transfers the ambient "heat" to the liquid. The fuller the tank the more metal of the tank that is in contact with the liquid so it is a larger heating surface and can transfer more heat. The portion of the tank that is in contact with vapor cannot transfer much heat. 

So you can see how the fill level effects the tank's ability to vaporize the liquid. The ambient temperature of course has a major effect as well.

Pressure is controlled by ambient temperature. We have a contained gas in a specific volume, not accounting for the gas we are using, when the temperature goes up so does the pressure. At low temperatures with high demand the pressure can get too low for the heater or engine to operate properly. 

I found this chart on the web. It is for a 100lb cylinder. 

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18 minutes ago, 12_Guy said:

Screenshot_20210925-094540_Chrome.thumb.jpg.5abef8e78a5958affbecc017077788e0.jpgThe wetted surface inside the tank is what transfers the ambient "heat" to the liquid. The fuller the tank the more metal of the tank that is in contact with the liquid so it is a larger heating surface and can transfer more heat. The portion of the tank that is in contact with vapor cannot transfer much heat. 

So you can see how the fill level effects the tank's ability to vaporize the liquid. The ambient temperature of course has a major effect as well.

Pressure is controlled by ambient temperature. We have a contained gas in a specific volume, not accounting for the gas we are using, when the temperature goes up so does the pressure. At low temperatures with high demand the pressure can get too low for the heater or engine to operate properly. 

I found this chart on the web. It is for a 100lb cylinder. 

Makes sense , That can also apply to freon pressure  also but maybe not at the pressures your specifying for propane

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46 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

I have actually heard of stories where people have had small tanks on their house. It was too cold to vaporize the propane so they started small fires under them to warm the tank. 

Sounds like a good idea to me! Not.

I do recall helping fry chicken for a church dinner when I was very young. Dad had set the fryer inside a garage because it was unseasonably chilly. He ran the hose under the door to the bottle outside.  The fryer quit heating because the tank frosted up. We had to move the tank indoors next to the fryer so it would warm up. I was probably 7 or 8 but it is etched in my mind. I didn’t understand the physics of the problem then but now I do. 

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On 9/25/2021 at 8:53 AM, ksfarmdude said:

Makes sense , That can also apply to freon pressure  also but maybe not at the pressures your specifying for propane

 

This rapid expansion ratio of 270:1 makes propane an effective refrigerant.

One gallon of liquid propane will make 270 gallons of vapor to the atmosphere.

If the pressures are not at the freon pressures, it is dang close.

Propane has been used for freon and it does work very well.

But don't use it because of the "Big Boom" factor.

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