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IH 1440 Rasp Bars


chadd
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I removed the rotor on our 1440 and noticed that there are several rasp bar positions that aren't being used.  Is this normal?  The previous owner only used it for corn but we usually do a 60/40 mixture of corn and soybeans during the year.  I have heard that there was a dealer service bulletin to remove some of the rasp bars on the early combines with a standard rotor because they didn't improve separation but consumed power, but I have no idea if these are the ones that are supposed to be removed...

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The bulletin you referred to recommends that you remove the short straight bars that are located by themselves. They are only needed in harder threshing small grains. They actually retard the flow of material in corn and beans. 

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I will look at my 1440, think they are there, had two filler plates on the first section, that I removed..

Nice sample in the bin, not much in the return, and hard to find any beans out the back on the ground.

If you remove the 3 straight bars will this be a improvement in soys?

Beans are all green and still growing, heavy pods, may be a totally different thresh than previous years.

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Most threshing problems are because the crop conditions aren't right  guys trying to cut when its too green or not mature I never get in a big toot cutting things that aren't right

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But what do you do when the beans are dry and the stems are green? Bean fields around here are rapidly changing from green to yellow so leaves will drop soon. Some guys will be harvesting in two weeks or less. The moisture level will be low. The stems will be tough. Ever since the seed companies bred the plants to stand better and not lodge we have had to adjust for this. I agree that it would be nice to wait but the moisture level in the beans indicate otherwise 

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22 minutes ago, striker782 said:

But what do you do when the beans are dry and the stems are green? Bean fields around here are rapidly changing from green to yellow so leaves will drop soon. Some guys will be harvesting in two weeks or less. The moisture level will be low. The stems will be tough. Ever since the seed companies bred the plants to stand better and not lodge we have had to adjust for this. I agree that it would be nice to wait but the moisture level in the beans indicate otherwise 

If the beans are dry enough to pop out and the stems are green, you need another seed supplier.  Sounds like the last Pioneer beans we planted. 

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Striker is right….welcome to the world of green stem soybeans. Find a variety that doesn’t offer green stem harvest conditions…and you’ll have the business of every farmer out there. It’s just the nature of the beast…and the reason for the introduction of the AFX rotor instead of the elephant ears used on the original IH standard rotor. 
 

In reference to the OP, it was rather commonplace around here to remove the front 2 sets of straight raspbars when guys had the standard rotors for fall crops….in our case dry corn and sunflowers(nobody raised soybeans around here in that time). Like Striker said, they would tend to overthrash fall crops. Then guys would put them back in next summer for extra thrashing in small grain…especially hard thrash spring wheat. Several guys would remove the bars when they installed large wire concaves for fall crops, then install them back on the rotor when they installed small wire concaves for small grain. 
 

If you’ve never had the “pleasure” of combining green stem soybeans, consider yourself very fortunate. 

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Some of the issues with green stems soybeans are genetic's some are weather related Our regular season bean stems dry down normally and don't shatter like they did yrs ago , However double crop beans are a different story we've had to wait for a killing frost some years the get the plants dry

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Thanks everyone for the information!  On our combine, the three straight bars closed to the nose of the rotor were removed but the three straight bars behind them were left in.  It has seemed to work okay that way for us so far.  I might try changing it up and see what effect removing them has.

As for green stemmed beans, they are pretty common around here.  As others have mentioned, sometimes we have had to wait for the frost to come through to get the moisture low enough to combine.  It is not uncommon to have green stem beans that have to come off whether they are ready or not because there is snow in the forecast and something is better than nothing...  The variety we use typically dries down pretty uniformly and quickly, so we'll get a little rumble here or there, but the rotor speed stays around 550 to 600 rpm or so.  I did some custom work for a friend and I don't know what variety he got that year but the only way we got any kind of ground speed without constant rotor rumble was to put the rotor gearbox in high range and run around 1000 or 1050rpm.

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1 hour ago, chadd said:

Thanks everyone for the information!  On our combine, the three straight bars closed to the nose of the rotor were removed but the three straight bars behind them were left in.  It has seemed to work okay that way for us so far.  I might try changing it up and see what effect removing them has.

As for green stemmed beans, they are pretty common around here.  As others have mentioned, sometimes we have had to wait for the frost to come through to get the moisture low enough to combine.  It is not uncommon to have green stem beans that have to come off whether they are ready or not because there is snow in the forecast and something is better than nothing...  The variety we use typically dries down pretty uniformly and quickly, so we'll get a little rumble here or there, but the rotor speed stays around 550 to 600 rpm or so.  I did some custom work for a friend and I don't know what variety he got that year but the only way we got any kind of ground speed without constant rotor rumble was to put the rotor gearbox in high range and run around 1000 or 1050rpm.

Green stemmed you need 670-740 rpm on the rotor. 

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On 9/11/2021 at 1:17 AM, jass1660 said:

Green stemmed you need 670-740 rpm on the rotor. 

Especially true if you are running a 1400 series with the "Armstrong" reverser........you don't want it slugged!!!!!

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I run Trimpe rasp bars on my 1460. Trimpe bars are very aggressive as they cut down every other bar and hardsurface them. Think of it as a course file vs a fine file. They will outlast the machine they are put on and some people say it makes the machine eat as good as the next size up machine. 
I also run the Estes Disrupters on mine.  
It is a standard rotor

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Seems that uneven feeding from the 1020 and feeder house would lead to the rotor rumble and not threshing, or roping or worse a plug, never have plugged and seems a full heavy even feed gives the best sample in the tank and very little loss out the back. Ground speed, reel speed, cant of the fingers all matched for the conditions. Rarely touch the concave setting, just slow or speed up the rotor, fan wide open chaffer and sieve, per book. Looked at the standard rotor all bars in place large wire concaves, removed the cover plates that original owner had in the front. Key stock grates with serrated bars. Checked the disrupters are available, $500, not sure if you really need them?

Getting things ready want to cut asap, beans go from 15 down to 10 percent moisture real quick rather pay for a little drying, then loose bushels to 10 percent moisture.

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I had a couple 1460’s and 1660’s with both Estes disrupters as well as Estes custom and hardfaced rasp bars, they went thru tough stems better than our 1460 with the specialty rotor. I’m talking the original ones that Don Estes himself designed and sold.

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5 minutes ago, Michigan No Till said:

Shoupe has his style disrupters, I think.

500 dollars in stock Does Don still out of Indiana, cm welding?? Really old posts on other forums..

Pretty sure he lost the original company in a divorce or something, the Estes stuff out now he has no affiliation with. He was in Illinois originally.

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5 hours ago, Michigan No Till said:

Shoupe has his style disrupters, I think.

500 dollars in stock

This is what I purchased 2 years ago from Shoup (& serrated bars) immediately after reading old RPF posts about 1400 series in beans.  No complaints and feel it was worth the money.

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