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Installing a keyed ignition switch and kid proofing an Farmall H.


the fixer
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Coming from a grumpy old ******* the tractor needs no mods IMHO. the kids need to learn the rules of the farm like the rest of us did. 

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9 hours ago, hillman said:

Coming from a grumpy old ******* the tractor needs no mods IMHO. the kids need to learn the rules of the farm like the rest of us did. 

Agreed but here’s the reality of the situation. You tell kids what they can or can’t do but they will always test at some point. If they test on the wrong thing that’s when terrible things can happen. 

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Kids r kids and its our job to protect even when they know better. 8 years and up on farms they should know better because many have run stuff already. It's the 3,4 and 5 year olds that can get themselves in trouble. My son was very young would watch me start a 574.I left the key in it (my fault),fuel was left in the run position. I guess,never dreamed he would be on it. He started it,it was in low gear,tractor headed off down through the yard slow,ran over bushes and through a fence untill someone stopped it.

He was found hiding behind a bush with his thumb in his mouth. He was probably only 3.

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On 9/2/2021 at 12:00 PM, the fixer said:

I'm a new owner of a 1948 Framall H with a loader.

I have 4 kids who want to do everything that dad does, including starting and operating equipment. 2 are old enough to stay home alone in the summer and help out some and 2 are way too young to understand the danger.

 

I'm concerned that the Farmall H only has an on-off switch to start the engine and that they may start the tractor while I'm away and hurt themselves, someone else or destroy something.

I've been looking to replace the stock ignition switch with a keyed ignition switch and need help finding a keyed switch that is open circuit while running and closed circuit in the off position to work with the stock mag ignition. Most switches that I see for sale are open in the off position and closed in the on position for battery ignition. 

What keyed ignition switch works on a Farmall H with the stock magneto ignition? If a switch happens to also prevent me or the kids from leaving the lights on to that would be a plus.

 

I'm currently disconnecting the battery when not in use to prevent the boys from cranking the tractor, but they work with me often and know how to reconnect the battery. 

What other ignition/starting tricks can be used to kid/theft proof a Farmall H?Can you drill thru the starter button shaft and pad lock it? Pull the coil wire when not in use? Drill the throttle plate and pad lock it in the idle position? Make some sort of Rue Goldburg contraption of relays and dip switches to arm the ignition?

 

 

On a separate note I am also teaching the kids farm safety and respect for equipment, so spare me the lectures about child rearing. Teaching ages 3 - 12 year old kids doesn't happen overnight where a simple key or disarming ignition/starter tricks can be done in an hour.  

This is an ounce of prevention to hopefully prevent a pound of cure.

Thank You:

J.L.

Bemidji Mn

No Use to Dismantle your Tractor and have the possibility of Kids finding the parts and possibly losing them for you

Ideas:

Is the Tractor parked inside? Could you lock it up? Have the Lock Key Hid or Keep it where you only know where it is at.

Park it with the Loader Positioned with the Bucket facing down with  the Cutting Edge pointed into/digging in the dirt. (Acting like a Second Parking Brake), like a Bale Spear Pointing into the dirt.

Taking off 1 Battery Cable

Pulling the Wire from the Coil to Distributor

Any Pins in the Throttle Linkage, or Choke Lever, Pull 1 out so it can't start that way maybe.

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I raised three very rambunctious boys around H's and M's and never had a problem.

But I would never blame a father for trying to keep his kids safe. 

How about locking your brakes on and designing a lock to keep the lock on. 

Depending on the style you have, either a fold over or sliding pin and a padlock. 

If you are standing there looking at how it works, it shouldn't be to hard to come up with something simple and effective. 

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Settle boys, maybe back it down 20-30% 

 

personaly i think the keyed battery switch is  great idea in general, solves the issues of the op and makes for a little less fire risk if things shorted out. 

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42 minutes ago, vtfireman85 said:

Settle boys, maybe back it down 20-30% 

 

personaly i think the keyed battery switch is  great idea in general, solves the issues of the op and makes for a little less fire risk if things shorted out. 

I agree with you that the battery switch will solve a couple of concerns. My issue with it or the keyed ignition switch is that they are so easily defeated. Then it's off to the races only to get it back in the barn and reconnected before pops gets home. The keyed ignition switch is a complete waste because all you need is a screwdriver or even a pocket knife to disconnect the ground wire from the mag. The battery disconnect is a little better but still easy enough to grab an adjustable and move one cable over to the other post and we're gone. 

I really like Jeff's suggestion about finding a way to padlock the brakes. Done correctly it would be difficult to defeat without doing some damage or cutting. 

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59 minutes ago, nomorejohndeere said:

The tractor has a loader.  There is more than one kiddo.  So just the brakes locked would still allow the tractor to be started, then one could raise the loader and drop it on another.

 

That is a valid point.

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I still think the idea of swapping around the plug wires is good. Nothing obvious to the eyes, easily reversed when you want to run the tractor.

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I don't have a technical answer but I commend the OP for his concern. I was the last of 6 kids,  5 boys in a row. My pop clearly told us what not to do, why were shouldn't do it and wasn't afraid to use his belt to back it up!

That said we easily forgot the warnings and the whoopings as soon as he went to work. My brothers always  tried to figure out a way to get any motorized vehicle to go. If we couldn't get our cub tractor to go we'd sneak across the road and "play" with our uncles. Made sure we parked them exactly where we found them and usually got away with it.

Bottom line, multiple roadblocks so it's just too difficult and increase the chances they'll get caught.

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8 hours ago, nomorejohndeere said:

 

I was being sarcastic and making fun at the same time, no fooling your radar............

And my suggestions are solid as far as kid proofing, probably solid enough to adult proof.......

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sarcasm doesn't always come across very well online when you just read the written word.

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Well that really opened up a can of worms.

I've decided to install a keyed ignition switch from a riding lawn mower to kill the ignition and to disconnect the battery to keep the younger kids from pressing the start button and moving the tractor using the starter. I park it outside backed up to wall on flat ground with the loader down.

Thank you all for your input. 

JL

Bemidji Mn 

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Not sure I understand the reaction from many here, I completely understand the OP’s desire to add a level of safety, perhaps more than many know.. when i was 5 i ran myself over with dads B-275, he had asked mom to start it and lift the loader, we were sugaring, so things were wet and the ground soft, i announced “i can do it mommy!” Before anyone could move i had ducked under the rail and, standing in front of the left rear tire reached up and pulled down on the starter lever, it started instantly and in gear, caught my right foot and ran up my legs directly up my back and by good fortune squished my head between lugs of new tires rather than on the traction bars. Tore a huge chunk of hair off my head about the size of a baseball  (which only came back for a few years 😂) left herringbone bruises up both legs and down the middle of my back. By some miracle I survived somewhat ragged looking but otherwise unscathed, a trip to the ER showed no broken bones, just abrasions and bruises everywhere. Took several years off my parents lives, i am sure. 
so yeah, i really get where the OP is coming from. I also believe starting kids early and teaching them respect for equipment, guns, animals another  dangers like roads and traffic is the best defense against mishaps, but if a key in your pocket means your 5 year old lives to adulthood sounds like a great insurance policy. 

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I was older than I care to admit to you all when I almost flipped an OS-4 over backwards onto myself, believe it or not. I still don't know exactly how it happened, but I think it was a perfect storm of wrong gear, a furrow, too much throttle, hard on the clutch, and most importantly here, bravado and the ignorance of youth. For every one of the miserable crusty curmudgeons here saying "well I survived my youth", perhaps a moment to reflect on the irony of that statement is in order.

Enough people, old and young, ignorant and experienced, have died in this country from farm accidents, including with tractors. Obviously those who died are not around to putz around on internet forums, but just because they can't say "it happened to me" doesn't mean it didn't happen.

I come back time and time again to something a flight instructor told me when I proudly proclaimed that I'd read dozens of accident reports and they were almost exclusively pilot error. I'm paraphrasing, but he said "You're halfway to understanding. You have seen that the cause was pilot error, but you've neglected that in many of those cases the pilot had hundreds, if not thousands of hours of logged experience. So, yes it was pilot error, but if they can make those mistakes, so can you, so never let your guard down. Dumb mistake or not, don't think you're ever above making a 'dumb' mistake"

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