Jump to content

Installing a keyed ignition switch and kid proofing an Farmall H.


the fixer
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm a new owner of a 1948 Framall H with a loader.

I have 4 kids who want to do everything that dad does, including starting and operating equipment. 2 are old enough to stay home alone in the summer and help out some and 2 are way too young to understand the danger.

 

I'm concerned that the Farmall H only has an on-off switch to start the engine and that they may start the tractor while I'm away and hurt themselves, someone else or destroy something.

I've been looking to replace the stock ignition switch with a keyed ignition switch and need help finding a keyed switch that is open circuit while running and closed circuit in the off position to work with the stock mag ignition. Most switches that I see for sale are open in the off position and closed in the on position for battery ignition. 

What keyed ignition switch works on a Farmall H with the stock magneto ignition? If a switch happens to also prevent me or the kids from leaving the lights on to that would be a plus.

 

I'm currently disconnecting the battery when not in use to prevent the boys from cranking the tractor, but they work with me often and know how to reconnect the battery. 

What other ignition/starting tricks can be used to kid/theft proof a Farmall H?Can you drill thru the starter button shaft and pad lock it? Pull the coil wire when not in use? Drill the throttle plate and pad lock it in the idle position? Make some sort of Rue Goldburg contraption of relays and dip switches to arm the ignition?

 

 

On a separate note I am also teaching the kids farm safety and respect for equipment, so spare me the lectures about child rearing. Teaching ages 3 - 12 year old kids doesn't happen overnight where a simple key or disarming ignition/starter tricks can be done in an hour.  

This is an ounce of prevention to hopefully prevent a pound of cure.

Thank You:

J.L.

Bemidji Mn

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a thought here, if the kiddos are helping, watching, learning etc, how long till they figure out that if they unhook the small ground wire on the side of the mag she will run just fine rendering the keyswitch useless??

 I think I would grab the coil wire on the way out of the barn. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They probably won't be long in figuring out where dad puts the key either. I understand your concern but I really think making sure they know the dangers is going to be key here no matter what you do or don't do. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hidden switch connected to the mag.... or a lockable battery disconnect switch.

Better yet, teach them all the ins/outs of running it, then give them a long list of chores that need to be done with it. Won't be long and they'll stay as far away from the tractor as possible. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes standard used to offer a switch with a magneto option for ground. Put a few in witching to 12 volt and left magneto on. I would just drill on off switch  hole bigger and mount switch there. Did about a 100  farmall 12 volt alt change over with key added.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Two options come to mind.

1) Use a key switch for a lawnmower with magneto ignition.

2) A little more complicated, especially if the system is still 6 volt. Use a normally closed relay for the magneto kill wire and ground the other load wire. You would also need a key switch which would then provide power to open the relay when running.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Battery disconnect switch from caterpillar

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, bitty said:

Battery disconnect switch from caterpillar

Switch….Cat 7N0718.  
Key…..Cat 8H5306.  
The numbers may update.  
Also might check at NAPA with the switch number.  Theirs may be cheaper.
Wire the switch into the battery ground cable circuit.  I think think this would not effect the ignition switch operation and definitely would stop rundown batteries from lights left on.

Brian

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We never pulled keys out of tractors when I was a kid. My dad and grandpa beat it into me what could happen if I didn’t listen. Never once did I think about running any machinery when I wasn’t supposed to. As soon as I was old enough, or probably just before I was old enough, my dad had me doing everything I could. Curiosity is what gets people and kids in trouble. Just let them run it and then they won’t be curious as to what that machine can do. They’ll know what it can do because they’ve done it. If it’s just a lawn tractor and you don’t have any real work to do, then I would think a battery disconnect like mentioned earlier would be a good solution. My dad never hesitated to tell me about lost limbs and shattered lives from accidents, all I knew was I didn’t want to to happen to me. I don’t mean anything towards the OP, but in general people just baby their kids too much. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

cat or other hidden key  but they learn fast

40 yrs ago garage owner lived at garage, by 3 grandson could hot wire,so we simply taught him to be/stand on and never leave the deck to ,bale with the 560

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your all missing something , Remove the coil wire and put it up somewhere where they can't find it , Problem solved

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, ksfarmdude said:

Your all missing something , Remove the coil wire and put it up somewhere where they can't find it , Problem solved

after 6 weeks WHEN YOU cant find it they will tell you where and how to install

  • Haha 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kids as I’m sure your aware are extremely smart. Personally I would be more worried about them turning over the engine with the engine in gear and running over one of their siblings.  Not sure what I would recommend, but I’ll share what I’ve seen done. 
 

Quick story about myself and my dad kid (and hired hand proofing the M). I don’t remember this but apparently I was 2 or 3 and down in the barn with my dad.  He had the M hooked to the manure spreader inside the side shed of the barn where the barn cleaner exited. Apparently I was unsupervised for a moment and managed to both pull the ignition button and hit starter button. The tractor always started real well and of course was in gear (reverse).  I’ve was told it ended up putting a hole through the side shed of the barn and I was headed toward the silo before somebody got me stopped.  My dads solution was to remove the starter cable from the switch and everytime he went to start it he would touch the bare cable off the batter post.  Not the way I would recommend but that kept me or anybody else from ever using that machine. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My mother had a genuine fear of the narrow front Farmall C killing my father. And there were enough true stories going around of farmers killed on equipment, that I understood the risk at the base of that fear. I would start with a couple of true stories. Not to shatter their innocence necessarily, but because some honest fear is healthy -it'll keep one alive.

Have they seen you operate the fuel shutoff? That would be a quick option.

You could also swap around plug wires when you put it away. Looking over the tractor, they wouldn't really know what was wrong when they tried to fire it up and it coughs and sputters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once there were two kids around here driving a narrow-front tractor and the narrow front drove up the outside corner of the barn and the tractor tipped over backwards onto them and killed them. A neighbor kid around here wondered if a tractor could really do that, so when home alone he drove the H up the outside corner of the barn until it was high enough he believed it could tip over backward and then put the H back and wiped away his tracks.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I took the battery with me and had it on the charging rack in the shop or bring them in the house with me in winter. When leaving any gas machine in the field I take the rotor out of the distributor so no one can mess with it, knock on wood no one's taken a tractor but I had a old 990 haybine stolen

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, ksfarmdude said:

Your all missing something , Remove the coil wire and put it up somewhere where they can't find it , Problem solved

Yes, it won't start that way, but it could still be cranked while in gear and move. Depending on the year, some models had a start mechanism that simply had to be stepped on. If a kid climbed aboard it wouldn't take much weight on the lever to get it cranking, and if they managed to get it in gear, even unintentionally, and the starter was in good shape, it could be "driven".  I remember as a kid, father ran out of gas with the 230 about 15 feet from the fuel tank. He put it in gear and used the starter to walk it the rest of the way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...