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Bypassing emissions on modern tractors?


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1 hour ago, vtfireman85 said:

How do you keep def in the tank from freezing? 

Having it freeze does not lead to the immediate ruination of the fluid.
DEF does not freeze until -15 F or thereabout. 

1 hour ago, SDman said:

DEF systems utilize engine coolant running through the sending unit to thaw it out. 

I was at training and there was an engineer visit us that had worked his entire career in emissions starting in the early '70s with automotive emissions.

He was telling us about the process that CNH went through with EPA to get the amount of time lengthened from cold start up to thawed DEF flow. CNH lobbied for 45 minutes of run time knowing they wouldn't get that but did get their desired time allowed for thawing to 30 minutes.

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4 hours ago, SDman said:

DEF systems utilize engine coolant running through the sending unit to thaw it out. 

I have heard that there are purge pumps to empty the DEF system and lines back into the tank?  Is this correct?

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3 minutes ago, E160BHM said:

I have heard that there are purge pumps to empty the DEF system and lines back into the tank?  Is this correct?

The same pump that supplies DEF to the engine during normal operation does this. 
 

The DEF module has what is called a reverting valve…in normal operation it supplies DEF to the engine/after treatment system. When you shut the engine off, this reverting valve reverses the direction of fluid flow…the DEF system pump evacuates the fluid in the lines back to the tank. 
 

With pretty much all machines with DEF, you will hear a buzzing noise on the machine for 60-90 seconds after shutting off the engine…that’s the DEF system doing its evacuation cycle. 

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In regards to DEF storage/use in seasonal equipment for us in the northern climate, this is something that can/will happen due to repeated freeze/thaw cycles and long periods being frozen…the liquid urea can separate from the water, leading to what’s referred to as “crystallized DEF”.  The stuff looks like chunks of dry fertilizer or golf balls, take your pick. 
 

If it sits long enough, eventually it will blend together again for a DEF solution that shouldn’t give you any problems; however, if you need to use it sooner rather than later, you will have to get this stuff out of your DEF tank or else you will have problems. We run into this on Steigers every spring when they are waking up from their long winter’s nap; combines don’t have this problem as they get to sit for another 3-4 months before waking up for another season. 
 

CNH recommends draining the DEF tank for long periods of inactivity and flushing them with water. Trust me, hardly anybody does it. If nothing else, I recommend running the DEF tank down as low as you dare before putting the machine away for the season(alarms start coming on when the DEF tank gets below 10% full). 

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68A2079F-7B81-4225-9D3C-0EA6431C837B.jpeg

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3 hours ago, SDman said:

In regards to DEF storage/use in seasonal equipment for us in the northern climate, this is something that can/will happen due to repeated freeze/thaw cycles and long periods being frozen…the liquid urea can separate from the water, leading to what’s referred to as “crystallized DEF”.  The stuff looks like chunks of dry fertilizer or golf balls, take your pick. 
 

If it sits long enough, eventually it will blend together again for a DEF solution that shouldn’t give you any problems; however, if you need to use it sooner rather than later, you will have to get this stuff out of your DEF tank or else you will have problems. We run into this on Steigers every spring when they are waking up from their long winter’s nap; combines don’t have this problem as they get to sit for another 3-4 months before waking up for another season. 
 

CNH recommends draining the DEF tank for long periods of inactivity and flushing them with water. Trust me, hardly anybody does it. If nothing else, I recommend running the DEF tank down as low as you dare before putting the machine away for the season(alarms start coming on when the DEF tank gets below 10% full). 

CC975C9E-87A8-4A14-8777-533A487813E0.jpeg

68A2079F-7B81-4225-9D3C-0EA6431C837B.jpeg

We learned about this the hard way on our windrower . It can be frosty weather during the first and last cuttings of haylage here. We had issues once with it crystalizing up. We try to run it almost out at the end of the season now

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14 hours ago, jass1660 said:

So how do we get away with a 330 gallon tote of it that takes two weeks to use? I know plenty of farms that keep partial 55 gallon totes in the warm shop all winter and use it i. The tractors in the spring.  I realize a pickup won’t go thru it near as fast as semis or tractors and especially combines. 

He was talking pickup use- basically said the 2.5’s you get at the parts house will crystallize in the spout when they dry. When you go to put the 1/2 gallon or so you didn’t use initially in you introduce DEF crystals into the tank. I run a 2019 6.7- uses very little. I only add DEF when I know I’ll hold an entire jug or two. So far no issues. 

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